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Benchmarking International Best Practice

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Benchmarking International Best Practice

  1. 1. 1 1 Benchmarking international best practice Benchmarking international best practice Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 Putting the World into World-Class Education Asia Society, Washington, July 10, 2009 Prof. Andreas Schleicher Head, Indicators and Analysis Division OECD Directorate for Education
  2. 2. 2 2 Benchmarking international best practice Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 There is nowhere to hide The yardstick for success is no longer improvement by national standards but the best performing education systems
  3. 3. Australia Austria A world of change – college education Czech Republic Denmark Finland Germany Greece Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Cost per student Japan Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Spain Sweden United Kingdom Graduate supply United States Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  4. 4. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) Cost per student United States Finland Graduate supply Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  5. 5. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) United States (2000) Australia Finland Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  6. 6. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  7. 7. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  8. 8. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  9. 9. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  10. 10. A world of change – college education Israel 5th in university attainment in the younger generation (but down from 2nd in the Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) older generation) United States Australia Finland Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  11. 11. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) United States Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  12. 12. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) United States Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  13. 13. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) United States Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  14. 14. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) United States Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  15. 15. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) United States Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  16. 16. A world of change – college education Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  17. 17. A world of change – college education r Rising higher education qualifications seem generally not to have led to an “inflation” of the Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD) labour-market value of qualifications.  In all but three of the 20 countries with available data, the earnings benefit increased between 1997 United States and 2003, in Germany, Italy and Hungary by between 20% and 40% Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  18. 18. 19 19 Moving targets Benchmarking international Future supply of high school graduates 14,000,000 12,000,000 best practice 10,000,000 8,000,000 2003 2010 Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 6,000,000 2015 4,000,000 2,000,000 0 China EU India US
  19. 19. 20 20 Future supply of high school graduates Benchmarking international 14 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 12 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 10 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 8 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 2003 6 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 2 0 10 4 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 2 0 15 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 Future supply of college graduates 0 C hi na EU I ndi a US 5,000,000 best practice 4,500,000 4,000,000 3,500,000 Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 3,000,000 2003 2,500,000 2010 2,000,000 2015 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 China EU India US
  20. 20. Putting the World Benchmarking international into World-Class Education best practice 21 21 Washington, July 10, 2009 the church medieval age: The school of Schooling in the
  21. 21. Putting the World Benchmarking international into World-Class Education best practice 22 22 Washington, July 10, 2009 discipline Educating for industrial age: Schooling in the
  22. 22. 23 23 Benchmarking international Schooling in the industrial age: best practice Educating for discipline Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 The challenges today: Motivated and self-reliant citizens Risk-taking entrepreneurs, converging and continuously emerging professions tied to globalising contexts and technological advance
  23. 23. 24 24 Benchmarking international How the demand for skills has changed Economy-wide measures of routine and non-routine task input (US) Mean task input as percentiles of the 1960 task distribution Routine manual 65 best practice 60 Nonroutine manual 55 Routine cognitive 50 Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 45 Nonroutine analytic 40 Nonroutine interactive 1960 1970 1980 1990 2002 The dilemma of schools: The skills that are easiest to teach and test are also the ones that are easiest to (Levy and Murnane) digitise, automate and outsource
  24. 24. 25 25 Benchmarking international Deciding what to assess... looking back at what students were best practice expected to have learned …or… looking ahead to how well they can Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 extrapolate from what they have learned and apply their knowledge and skills in novel settings. For the PISA assessment of the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds, OECD governments chose the latter
  25. 25. 26 26 Mathematics in PISA Benchmarking international The real world The mathematical World Making the problem amenable to mathematical treatment best practice A model of reality A mathematical Understanding, struct model uring and simplifying the situation Using relevant mathematical A real situation Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 tools to solve the problem Validating the results Real results Mathematical results Interpreting the mathematical results
  26. 26. 27 27 OECD‟s PISA assessment of the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds Benchmarking international Coverage of world economy 83% 87% 86% 85% 81% 77% best practice Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009
  27. 27. High science performance 565 Finland 28 28 Average performance of 15-year-olds in Benchmarking international 545 science – extrapolate and apply Hong Kong-China Chinese Taipei Canada Estonia Japan New Zealand Australia 525 Netherlands best practice Liechtenstein Korea Slovenia United Kingdom Germany Czech Republic Switzerland Macao-China Austria Ireland Belgium 505 Hungary Sweden Poland France Denmark Iceland Croatia Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 United States Latvia Slovak Republic, Spain, Lithuania Norway 485 Luxembourg Russian Federation Portugal Italy Greece 465 Israel 445 16 … 18 countries perform below this line 6 Low science performance
  28. 28. 29 29 Increased likelihood of postsec. particip. at age 19 associated with reading proficiency at age 15 (Canada) Benchmarking international after accounting for school engagement, gender, mother tongue, place of residence, parental, education and family income (reference group Level 1) 20 best practice 18 16 14 12 Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 10 8 6 4 2 0 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5
  29. 29. 30 30 The cost of inaction Benchmarking international Improved GDP from achieving the goal of being first in the world by 2000 Percent addition to GDP 40 best practice 30 10-year reform 20 20-year reform Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 30-year reform Total U.S. K-12 spending 10 0 89 94 99 04 14 19 24 29 34 39 44 49 54 59 64 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Note: *K-12 education expenitures are assumed to be constant at the level attained in 2005. These data show that economic benefits from a 1989 reform that raised the U.S. to the highest levels of test performance would cover the cost of K-12 education by 2015 Source: Eric Hanushek
  30. 30. 31 31 r The international achievement gap is imposing on the US economy an invisible yet recurring Benchmarking international economic loss that is greater than the output shortfall in what has been called the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression best practice  If the United States had in recent years closed the gap to better-performing nations such as Finland and Korea, GDP in 2008 could have been $1.3 trillion to $2.3 trillion higher (equivalent to 9 – 16% of GDP) Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009  If the gap between black and Latino student performance and white student performance had been similarly narrowed, GDP in 2008 would have been between$310 billion and $525 billion higher – The magnitude of this impact will rise in the years ahead as demographic shifts result in blacks and Latinos becoming a larger proportion of the population and workforce.
  31. 31. High science performance 565 Finland 37 37 Average performance High average performance Highof 15-year-olds in average performance Benchmarking international Large socio-economic disparities 545 science – extrapolate High social equity and apply Hong Kong-China Chinese Taipei Canada Estonia Japan New Zealand Australia 525 Netherlands best practice Liechtenstein Korea Slovenia United Kingdom Germany Czech Republic Switzerland Macao-China Austria Ireland Belgium Strong socio- 505 Hungary Socially equitable economic impact on Sweden distribution of learning Poland student performance France Denmark opportunities Iceland Croatia Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 United States Latvia Slovak Republic, Spain, Lithuania Norway 485 Luxembourg Russian Federation Portugal Italy Greece 465 Low average performance Israel Low average performance Large socio-economic disparities 445 High social equity 16 6 Low science performance
  32. 32. High science performance 38 38 560 Finland Durchschnittliche High average performance High average performance Benchmarking international Schülerleistungen im Large socio-economic disparities High social equity 540 Bereich Mathematik Hong Kong-China Chinese Taipei Canada New Zealand Estonai Japan Australia Netherlands best practice Liechtenstein Korea Slovenia 520 Germany United Kingdom Czech Republic Switzerland Macao-China Belgium Austria Strong socio- Ireland Socially equitable Hungary economic impact on Sweden distribution of learning 500 student performance Poland Denmark opportunities France Croatia Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 United States Latvia Iceland Slovak Republic Lithuania Spain Norway Luxembourg 480 Russian Federation Portugal Italy Greece 460 Low average performance Low average performance Israel Large socio-economic disparities High social equity 15 440 22 Low science performance 12 2
  33. 33. PISA Briefing of Council OECD Programme for International Student Assessment 14 November 2007 43 43 How to get there international comparisons Some policy levers that emerge from
  34. 34. 44 44 Benchmarking international Money matters - but other things do too Science performance 575 Finland 550 best practice Japan New Zealand Australia Korea Germany Netherlands 525 Czech Republic Switzerland United Kingdom Austria Belgium 500 Hungary Ireland Sweden Poland Denmark United States France Slovak Republic Spain Iceland Norway Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 475 Greece Portugal Italy 450 425 Turkey y = 0.0006x + 462 Mexico R² = 0.1904 400 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 70000 80000 90000 100000 Cumulative expenditure (US$ converted using PPPs)
  35. 35. Putting the World Benchmarking international into World-Class Education best practice 45 45 Washington, July 10, 2009 0 5 10 15 -10 -5 Portugal Spain Percentage points Switzerland Turkey Belgium Korea Luxembourg Germany Greece Salary as % of GDP/capita Japan Australia United Kingdom New Zealand France Netherlands Instruction time Denmark Italy Austria Difference with OECD average Czech Republic Hungary Norway per student as a percentage of GDP per capita (2004) 1/teaching time Iceland Ireland Mexico Finland Spending choices on secondary schools Contribution of various factors to upper secondary teacher compensation costs Sweden United States 1/class size Poland Slovak Republic
  36. 36. 46 46 Benchmarking international High ambitions and universal standards Rigor, focus and best practice coherence Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 Great systems attract great teachers and provide access to best practice and quality professional development
  37. 37. 47 47 Challenge and support Benchmarking international Strong support best practice Poor performance Strong performance Improvements idiosyncratic Systemic improvement Low High Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 challenge challenge Poor performance Conflict Stagnation Demoralisation Weak support
  38. 38. 48 Human capital 48 Benchmarking international International Best Practice The past • Principals who are • Principals who manage „a trained, empowered, accountable building‟, who have little training best practice and provide instructional and preparation and are leadership accountable but not empowered • Attracting, recruiting and • Attracting and recruiting teachers providing excellent training for from the bottom third of the Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 prospective teachers from the top graduate distribution and offering third of the graduate distribution training which does not relate to real classrooms • Incentives, rules and funding • The best teachers are in the most encourage a fair distribution of advantaged communities teaching talent
  39. 39. 49 Human capital (cont…) 49 Benchmarking international International Best Practice The past • Expectations of teachers are • Seniority and tenure matter more clear; consistent quality, strong than performance; patchy best practice professional ethic and excellent professional development; wide professional development focused variation in quality on classroom practice • Teachers and the system expect • Wide achievement gaps, just every child to succeed and beginning to narrow but systemic Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 intervene preventatively to ensure and professional barriers to this transformation remain in place
  40. 40. 51 Perception of teachers of the impact of appraisal and 51 feedback in their school Benchmarking international Teachers who would receive increased monetary or non-monetary rewards if they improve the quality of their teaching Teachers who would receive increased monetary or non-monetary rewards if they are more innovative in their teaching Teachers whose school principal takes steps to alter the monetary rewards of a persistently underperforming teacher Teachers will be dismissed because of sustained poor performance in teacher's school 80 best practice % 60 40 20 0 Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 20 40 60 80 Countries are ranked in descending order of percentage of teachers reporting to receive increased monetary or non-monetary rewards for an improvement in the quality of their teaching. Figure Source: OECD. Table 5.9. 5.7
  41. 41. 52 52 Benchmarking international High ambitions Devolved responsibility, best practice the school as the centre of action Accountability and intervention in Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 inverse proportion to success Access to best practice and quality professional development
  42. 42. 53 School autonomy, standards-based 53 examinations and science performance Benchmarking international School autonomy in selecting teachers for hire 70 PISA score best practice 60 in science 50 41 40 Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 30 20 10 Yes 0 No Standards based No external School autonomy Yes examinations in selecting teachers for hire
  43. 43. 54 54 Local responsibility and national prescription Benchmarking international Towards system-wide sustainable reform best practice National prescription Schools today Schools Finland today The industrial tomorrow? Every school an Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 model, detailed Building capacity effective school prescription of what schools do Schools leading reform
  44. 44. 55 55 Public and private schools Government schools Observed performance difference Government dependent private Benchmarking international Government independent private Difference after accounting for socio-economic background of students and schools % 0 20 40 60 80 -150 100 -100 -50 0 50 100 Score point difference Luxembourg Japan Italy best practice Switzerland Finland Denmark Czech Republic Sweden Hungary Austria Public schools Private schools Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 Portugal perform better perform better United States Netherlands Slovak Republic Korea Ireland Spain Canada Mexico New Zealand Germany OECD United Kingdom
  45. 45. Pooled international dataset, effects of selected 56 56 Benchmarking international school/system factors on science performance after accounting for all other factors in the model 100 School principal‟s positive evaluation of quality of 90 Schools with more educational materials competing schools 80 (gross only) (gross only) Schools with greater best practice Score point difference in science 70 autonomy (resources) 60 (gross and net) School activities to 50 promote sciencehour of One additional learning self-study or homework (gross and net) 40 One additional hour of (gross and net) 30 science learning at school School resultsnet) (gross and posted Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 Approx. one 20 school year publicly (grossselective Academically and net) 10 schools (gross and net) but no system-wide effect 0 Schools practicing ability One additional hour of out- grouping (gross and net) 10 of-school lessons Each additional 10% of School principal‟s (gross funding public and net) 20 perception that lack of (gross only) Effect after accounting qualified teachers hinders 30 for the socio-economic Measured effect Gross instruction background of Net (gross only) students, schools and countries OECD (2007), PISA 2006 – Science Competencies from Tomorrow‟s World, Table 6.1a
  46. 46. 57 57 Benchmarking international Strong ambitions Devolved Integrated best practice educational responsibility, the school as the centre opportunities of action From prescribed Accountability forms of teaching and Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 assessment towards personalised learning Access to best practice and quality professional development
  47. 47. High science performance 58 58 560 Durchschnittliche Finland High average performance High average performance Benchmarking international Schülerleistungen im Large socio-economic disparities High social equity Bereich Mathematik 540 Canada New Zealand Japan Netherlands Australia best practice 520 Korea Germany United Kingdom Czech Republic Belgium Austria Switzerland Ireland Strong socio- Hungary Socially equitable Sweden economic impact on 500 Poland distribution of learning student performance France Denmark opportunities United States Spain Iceland Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 Slovak Republic Norway Luxembourg 480 Portugal Greece Italy 460 Early selection and institutional differentiation Low average performance Low average performance High degree of stratification 440 Large socio-economic disparities Low degree of stratification High social equity 6 Low science performance
  48. 48. 59 59 Paradigm shifts Benchmarking international The old bureaucratic education system The modern enabling education system Hit & miss Universal high standards Uniformity Embracing diversity best practice Provision Outcomes Bureaucratic – look up Devolved – look outwards Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 Talk equity Deliver equity Received wisdom Data and best practice Prescription Informed profession Demarcation Collaboration
  49. 49. Creating a knowledge-rich profession in which schools and 60 60 Benchmarking international teachers have the authority to act, the necessary knowledge to do so wisely, and access to effective support systems The future of education systems is “knowledge rich” best practice Informed Informed professional prescription judgement, the teacher as a “knowledge worker” National Professional Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 prescription judgement Uninformed Uninformed professional prescription, teachers judgement, teachers implement curricula working in isolation The tradition of education systems has been “knowledge poor”
  50. 50. 61 61 Benchmarking international  www.oecd.org; www.pisa.oecd.org – All national and international publications – The complete micro-level database best practice  email: pisa@oecd.org  Thank you ! Andreas.Schleicher@OECD.org Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 … and remember: Without data, you are just another person with an opinion
  51. 51. 62 62 Do teachers trust in their own effectiveness? Making a significant Successful with students Making progress with Benchmarking international educational difference in their class students Australia Dark green bars Austria represent teachers Belgium (Fl.) Brazil who strongly agree Bulgaria best practice Denmark Estonia Hungary Iceland Light green bars Ireland represent teachers Italy Korea who agree Lithuania Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 Malaysia Malta Mexico Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Slovenia Spain Turkey TALIS Average 23% 69% 19% 76% 61% 22% 0 100 0 100 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 40 50 60 70 80 90 10 20 30 0
  52. 52. Putting the World Benchmarking international into World-Class Education best practice 63 63 Washington, July 10, 2009 10% 30% 40% 50% 60% 80% 90% 20% 70% 0% 100% Bulgaria Estonia Hungary Slovak Republic Lithuania Source: OECD, TALIS Database. Slovenia Poland 8% Ireland Denmark Norway Austria Administrative tasks TALIS Average Turkey Belgium (Fl.) Keeping order in the classroom Korea Malta Italy 13% Spain Time actually used for teaching and learning Australia Portugal Iceland Malaysia How much time is actually used for learning? Mexico 4.9 Brazil Figure
  53. 53. Putting the World Benchmarking international into World-Class Education best practice 64 64 Washington, July 10, 2009 % 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 0 100 Australia Austria Belgium (Fl.) Brazil Bulgaria 75th-95th percentile Denmark Estonia Hungary Source: OECD, TALIS Database. Iceland Ireland Italy 50th-75th percentile Korea Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mexico 25th-50th percentile Norway Poland Percentiles of time on spent on task Portugal Slovak Republic Slovenia 5th-25th percentile Spain Turkey 4.10 Some teachers lose much more time than others TALIS Average Figure
  54. 54. 65 Professional development 65 Benchmarking international r Countries are investing significantly in teachers‟ professional development but there appear to be real issues about matching demand best practice and supply, cost and benefit. r There is a lack of suitable development activities on offer to satisfy teachers‟ demand Putting the World Washington, July 10, 2009 into World-Class Education and it is notable that those teachers who take part in more days of development are more likely to have to contribute towards the cost themselves
  55. 55. 66 66 Benchmarking international Comparison of the level and intensity of Average days of professional development undertaken participation in professional development 40 TALIS Average Mexico 35 Korea best practice Italy 30 Bulgaria Poland Spain 25 Portugal Brazil 20 Putting the World Washington, July 10, 2009 into World-Class Education TALIS Average 15 Hungary Turkey Estonia Iceland 10 Denmark Malaysia Lithuania Austria Norway Australia Slovenia Slovak Republic Belgium (Fl.) Ireland Malta 5 0 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 Percentage of teachers undertaking professional development Source: OECD. Table 3.1 Figure 3.2
  56. 56. 67 67 Relatively few teachersImpacto?the kinds of professional participate in development which they find has the largest impact on their work Benchmarking international Comparison of teachers participating in professional development activities and teachers reporting moderate or high level impact by types of activity % 100 best practice 90 80 70 60 50 40 Average 30 Austria Putting the World Washington, July 10, 2009 into World-Class Education 20 10 0 Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Impact Impact Impact Impact Impact Impact Impact Impact Impact Individual and collaborative researchReading professional literature MentoringObservation visits to conferences and Qualification programmes improve teaching and workshops Informal dialogue to CoursesProfessional development network and peer observationother schools Education Figure 3.15
  57. 57. 68 68 Benchmarking international Relatively few teachers participate in the kinds of professional development which they find has the largest impact on their work Comparison of teachers participating in professional development activities and teachers reporting moderate or high level impact by types of activity best practice Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 Figure 3.15
  58. 58. 70 70 Benchmarking international The teachers who paid most also did most professional development Paid no cost Paid some cost Paid all cost Days of development best practice 100 90 80 70 60 50 Putting the World Washington, July 10, 2009 into World-Class Education 40 30 20 10 0 TALIS… Slovak… Portugal Malaysia Spain Brazil Denmark Austria Lithuania Italy Norway Iceland Poland Australia Korea Hungary Slovenia Bulgaria Estonia Malta Turkey Ireland Mexico Belgium (Fl.) Countries are ranked in descending order of percentage of teachers having paid all of the cost of development they took Figure Source: OECD. Table 3.5a 3.10
  59. 59. 71 71 It‟s not just about more of the same For what type of professional development Benchmarking international do teachers report a high level of need? % 70 60 best practice 50 40 30 20 Putting the World into World-Class Education Washington, July 10, 2009 10 0 Teaching ICT teaching Student Instructional Subject field Student Content and Student Teaching in a Classroom School special skills discipline and practices counselling performance assessment multicultural management management learning needs behaviour standards practices setting and students problems administration Areas are ranked in descending order of the international average where teachers report a high level of need for development. Source: OECD. Table 3.2 Figure 3.6
  60. 60. 76 Teacher appraisal and feedback 76 Benchmarking international r Teachers generally respond positively to appraisal and feedback but such practices are not widespread best practice r Connection between school evaluation and teacher appraisal/feedback can be effective in influencing teaching practices Putting the World Washington, July 10, 2009 into World-Class Education r Three-quarters reported that they would receive no recognition for improving the quality of their work or for being more innovative in their teaching

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