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JIAM ROSARIO 1ID-4
TH
• 11

th
12

and
Century
• Western Europe
• Contains elements of Early
Medieval, Carolingian and
Byzantine Art.
• Deriv...
1. The Round Arch
a. semi-circular – round arch
whose intrados is a full semicircle

GREAT BRITAIN, DURHAM,
CATHEDRAL
• 1. The Round Arc
b. segmental – shallow arc;
arc that is less than a semicircle

PERSIMMON HOMES
• The Round Arch
c. stilted –arc begins above the impost line

ALHAMBRA, GRANADA,
SPAIN
• The Round Arch
d. horseshoe arch- also called
moorish arc and keyhole arc

The Reales Alcazares of Sevilla
• Mouldings and Ornamentations
a. chevron – zigzag

WORMS CATHEDRAL
• Mouldings and Ornamentations
b. nailheads- series of small
contiguous projecting pyramids

Ross,

St. Mary's Church, New...
• Mouldings and Ornamentations
c. billet – formed by series
of circular, cylinders, disposed
alternately with notches

STR...
• Mouldings and Ornamentations
d. lozenges – tongue-like prostrusions
- diamond shape

ROCHESTER
• Mouldings and Ornamentations
e. cable – imitation of rope or cord

BECKFORD
• Mouldings and Ornamentations
f. star- also called chip-carved star,
motive star flower, or saltire cross

ALHAMBRA
• Capitals
a. Cushion- modeled like a bowl
-also called block cushion or cubic capital

MICHAELSKIRCHE,
HILDESHEIM
• Capitals
a. Scalloped – each lunette is developed into several
truncated cones.

ST. PETER’S CHURCH
• Roofs
-over hung the walls for drainage purposes
-supported by a cornice at the top of the wall
(gutters)
-stood upon co...
• Roof
*Corbels
*Parapet

*Corbel Table
• Ribbed Vault – vault in which the surface is divided into
webs by a framework of diagonal arched ribs

*vault – an arche...
• Doorways
- inner arch was filled by a stone slab called a
TYMPANUM which acted as the focal point of the ornament

ST. G...
FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE
• Cathedrals
- cruciform plan

* Latin cross plan – nave is longer

*Greek Cross Plan – four equal a...
FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE
• Cathedrals
- three horizontal stages

a. Ground floor arcade

b. Triforium arcade
FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE
• Cathedrals
-clerestory arcade – comprises
a row of windows
-towers and steeples were
simple, wide,...
FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE
• Monasteries
-arrange around a quadrangle
-sited just outside the city gates
a. church
b. cloister
...
FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE
• Monasteries

*Monastery of Saint-Martin-duConigou

France, 1001-26
FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE
• Castles
- first called as keep
-stood on hills
-started as defense structure
FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE
• Castles

Neuschwanstein Castle, Germany
Cardiffe Castle, England
FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE
• Fortress
- buildings or structures designed for the defense of
territories
• 12TH – 15TH Century
• OPUS FRANGENICUM (French Work)
• dating from after the Norman period but before
the renaissance.
• Early English or Lancet
-made use of plain quadripartite ribbed vault, slender
tower with spires and butresses

CATHEDRA...
• Early English or Lancet
- windows were lancets

- developed TRACERY
*trefoil
*quatrefoil
*cinque foil

CANTERBURY
CATHED...
• Decorated
- two types of tracery
a. geometric-motifs based upon the
circle and its
components parts

b. curvilinear-comp...
• Decorated
- bar tracery

-stone vaulting
1. intervening ribs
2. lierne ribs

SAINT SEVERIN, PARIS
• Perpendicular
-horizontal panel decoration (WAINSCOTING)
-windows are vertically divided by MULLIONS
-windows are horizo...
• Perpendicular
-fan vaulting
-timber roof
-rose windows
CHARACTERISTICS OF GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE
1. Pointed arch- flexible than the round arch
2. Ribbed vaulting to fan vaulting
3....
CHARACTERISTICS OF GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE
5. Pinnacles- a small turret-like termination on top of
buttresses, parapets or els...
• French word meaning “rebirth”
• Considered to be a cultural movement
• Rebirth of the art of classic antiquity that
occu...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. Florentine
• Dante
-Dante Alighieri
-Philospher, Scholar, Poet
- The Divine Comedy
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. Florentine
• Petrarch
-Francisco Petrarca
-Philospher, Poet
- Father of Humanism
- Father of the...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. Florentine
• Boccaccio
-Giovanni Boccaccio
-Poet, Storyteller
- Decameron
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. Florentine
• Renaissance Architecture
-largely inspired by the rediscovery of classical form s a...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. Florentine
•
Renaissance Architecture
Examples:
a. Dome of the Cathedral of Florence
• Filippo B...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. Florentine
•
Renaissance Architecture
Examples:
b. Ospedale Degli Innocenti (Foundling Hospital)...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. Florentine
•
Renaissance Architecture
Examples:
c. Palazzo Medici-Ricardi (1444)
- Architect Mic...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. Florentine
•
Renaissance Architecture
Examples:
d. Palazzo Pitti (AD 1435)
- Erected by Luca Pit...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. Florentine
•
Renaissance Architecture
Examples:
e. Palazzo Rucellai
• Leon Battista Alberti
- au...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. High Renaissance – Rome
- Less concerned with rational order than the visual
effectiveness
- Pop...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. High Renaissance – Rome
Examples:
b. Capitoline Hill
• Campidoglio Rome 1564, Michelangelo
- Mic...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. High Renaissance – Rome
Examples:
b. Capitoline Hill
• Plazza is an abstraction of the human fig...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
1. High Renaissance – Rome
Examples:
c. Villa Capra or Rotonda
• Andrea Palladio, Venice
-influence...
A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
CHARACTERISTICS OF ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
ARCHITECTURE
3. Doors and Windows – molded architrave of the...
B. FRENCH RENAISSANCE
- Reigns of Francis I, Francis II, Charles IV, Henry III, Louis
XIII
Examples:
1. Chateau de Chambor...
B. FRENCH RENAISSANCE
Examples:
2. Palais de Fontainbleu (1528)
• Favorite residence of Francis I
• Originally a convent
•...
B. FRENCH RENAISSANCE
Examples:
3. Palais de Louvre
• Paris(1548-1878)
• Built on the site of the old gothic chateau
• Pat...
B. FRENCH RENAISSANCE
CHARACTERISTIC OF FRENCH RENAISSANCE
ARCHITECTURE
1. Transitional Period – Gothic & Renaissance feat...
C. ENGLISH RENAISSANCE
- Early Modern Period
- William Shakespeare, John Milton, Jon Donne, Katherine Philips
1. Tudor-Eli...
• C. ENGLISH RENAISSANCE
2. Jacobean Style (1603-1649)
• Second phase of Renaissance Architecture in England
• Named after...
CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MANNERIST MOVEMENT
1. Last phase of renaissance
2. 17th century
3. Play with space & volume
4. Exem...
CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MANNERIST MOVEMENT
1. Last phase of renaissance
2. 17th century
3. Play with space & volume
4. Exem...
• Portuguese word “BAROCO” meaning odd shape, imperfect
pearl
• Developed in Later Renaissance
• Revolt against Classical ...
CHARACTERISTICS OF BAROQUE ARCHIETECTURE
1. curves, double curves & diagonal lines
2. Strong contrast of light & shadow
3....
A. ITALIAN BAROQUE
- Baroque was art born in Rome
Examples:
a. Saint Peter’s Basillica
• façade – Carlo Maderno
-swiss-ita...
A. ITALIAN BAROQUE
- Baroque was art born in Rome
Examples:
a. Saint Peter’s Basillica
• Dome of St. Peter – Michelangelo
...
A. ITALIAN BAROQUE
- Baroque was art born in Rome
Examples:
b. The Fountain of Trevi
• Largest & most famous
• Designed by...
A. ITALIAN BAROQUE
- Baroque was art born in Rome
Examples:
c. Santa Maria della Salute
• Refered to as “La Salute”
• Veni...
B. FRENCH BAROQUE
- Baroque entered France on a grand scale at
Versaille
-Official architecture of the 17th to 18th centur...
B. FRENCH BAROQUE
Examples:
b. Versaille Palace
• Reign of Louis XIV
• Park – Andre’ Le Notre
• Palace – Mansart and Charl...
C. ENGLISH BAROQUE
- Charles III
- Buildings have been characterized by dignity,
practicality, consistence unique
Examples...
•
•
•
•
•

“Rocaille” and “Cocaille” meaning rockwork and shellwork
Prominence = Louis XV
18th Century
Gay, elegant and re...
CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCOCO ARCHITECTURE
1. Reversal of the feeling of Baroque
2. Light and airy
3. Intimate/delicate
4. Int...
Examples:
a. Petit Trianon
• Made for Madame du Barry/ Marie Antoinette by Gabriel
• Small chateau located on the grounds ...
Examples:
b. The Wies Pilgrimage Church of the Scourged Saviour
• Oval rococo church
• Dominikus Zimmermann
• Also known as classic revivals
• During the reign of Louis XVI
Examples:
a. The Madeleine in Paris
• Intended as Pantheon
• Build by order of Napoleon
• Corinthian Columns
• Greek Colum...
Examples:
b. Church of Les Invalides
• Designed by Bruant & Monsart
• Remodeled by Le Vau
• Greek cross plan with circular...
Examples:
c. Paris Opera House
• 1874
• Charles Garnier
• Reflects the taste of Nouveau Riche
Examples:
d. Jefferson Monticello, Virginia
• influenced by Lord Burlington
-18th century english neoclassicist
• Influenc...
Examples:
e. Cheswick House
• Domed italianate villa
• Lord Burlington built for himself
• 1726
A. Gothic Revival
B. Victorian
- middle of 19th century
- IRON discovered in Mesopotamia & Egypt
Examples:
a. Crystal Palace
• Joseph Paxton...
B. Victorian
- middle of 19th century
- IRON discovered in Mesopotamia & Egypt
Examples:
b. The Eiffel Tower
• Paris Exhib...
Romanesque to Eclecticism
Romanesque to Eclecticism
Romanesque to Eclecticism
Romanesque to Eclecticism
Romanesque to Eclecticism
Romanesque to Eclecticism
Romanesque to Eclecticism
Romanesque to Eclecticism
Romanesque to Eclecticism
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Romanesque to Eclecticism

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HWA PRESENTATION BY JIAM ROSARIO
1ID-4 CFAD/UST

Published in: Education, Spiritual
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Romanesque to Eclecticism

  1. 1. JIAM ROSARIO 1ID-4
  2. 2. TH • 11 th 12 and Century • Western Europe • Contains elements of Early Medieval, Carolingian and Byzantine Art. • Derived from Roman Art.
  3. 3. 1. The Round Arch a. semi-circular – round arch whose intrados is a full semicircle GREAT BRITAIN, DURHAM, CATHEDRAL
  4. 4. • 1. The Round Arc b. segmental – shallow arc; arc that is less than a semicircle PERSIMMON HOMES
  5. 5. • The Round Arch c. stilted –arc begins above the impost line ALHAMBRA, GRANADA, SPAIN
  6. 6. • The Round Arch d. horseshoe arch- also called moorish arc and keyhole arc The Reales Alcazares of Sevilla
  7. 7. • Mouldings and Ornamentations a. chevron – zigzag WORMS CATHEDRAL
  8. 8. • Mouldings and Ornamentations b. nailheads- series of small contiguous projecting pyramids Ross, St. Mary's Church, New County Wexford - Piscina
  9. 9. • Mouldings and Ornamentations c. billet – formed by series of circular, cylinders, disposed alternately with notches STRAGGLETHORPE
  10. 10. • Mouldings and Ornamentations d. lozenges – tongue-like prostrusions - diamond shape ROCHESTER
  11. 11. • Mouldings and Ornamentations e. cable – imitation of rope or cord BECKFORD
  12. 12. • Mouldings and Ornamentations f. star- also called chip-carved star, motive star flower, or saltire cross ALHAMBRA
  13. 13. • Capitals a. Cushion- modeled like a bowl -also called block cushion or cubic capital MICHAELSKIRCHE, HILDESHEIM
  14. 14. • Capitals a. Scalloped – each lunette is developed into several truncated cones. ST. PETER’S CHURCH
  15. 15. • Roofs -over hung the walls for drainage purposes -supported by a cornice at the top of the wall (gutters) -stood upon corbels *corbel table – cornice & corbels
  16. 16. • Roof *Corbels *Parapet *Corbel Table
  17. 17. • Ribbed Vault – vault in which the surface is divided into webs by a framework of diagonal arched ribs *vault – an arched brick or stone ceiling or roof
  18. 18. • Doorways - inner arch was filled by a stone slab called a TYMPANUM which acted as the focal point of the ornament ST. GERMANUS CHURCH CHURCH OF THE BLESSED KILPECK
  19. 19. FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE • Cathedrals - cruciform plan * Latin cross plan – nave is longer *Greek Cross Plan – four equal arms
  20. 20. FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE • Cathedrals - three horizontal stages a. Ground floor arcade b. Triforium arcade
  21. 21. FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE • Cathedrals -clerestory arcade – comprises a row of windows -towers and steeples were simple, wide, low, richly ornamented on all four faces with arcading
  22. 22. FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE • Monasteries -arrange around a quadrangle -sited just outside the city gates a. church b. cloister c. dormitory d. library e. almonry f. infirmary g. abbot’s lodging
  23. 23. FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE • Monasteries *Monastery of Saint-Martin-duConigou France, 1001-26
  24. 24. FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE • Castles - first called as keep -stood on hills -started as defense structure
  25. 25. FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE • Castles Neuschwanstein Castle, Germany Cardiffe Castle, England
  26. 26. FORMS OF ARCHITECTURE • Fortress - buildings or structures designed for the defense of territories
  27. 27. • 12TH – 15TH Century • OPUS FRANGENICUM (French Work) • dating from after the Norman period but before the renaissance.
  28. 28. • Early English or Lancet -made use of plain quadripartite ribbed vault, slender tower with spires and butresses CATHEDRAL OF MILAN
  29. 29. • Early English or Lancet - windows were lancets - developed TRACERY *trefoil *quatrefoil *cinque foil CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL
  30. 30. • Decorated - two types of tracery a. geometric-motifs based upon the circle and its components parts b. curvilinear-complicated patterns
  31. 31. • Decorated - bar tracery -stone vaulting 1. intervening ribs 2. lierne ribs SAINT SEVERIN, PARIS
  32. 32. • Perpendicular -horizontal panel decoration (WAINSCOTING) -windows are vertically divided by MULLIONS -windows are horizontally divided by TRANSOMS -the head may be enclosed by obtuse arch or FOUR CENTERED ARCH
  33. 33. • Perpendicular -fan vaulting -timber roof -rose windows
  34. 34. CHARACTERISTICS OF GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE 1. Pointed arch- flexible than the round arch 2. Ribbed vaulting to fan vaulting 3. Thin pointed vaults supported by slender columns 4. Flying buttress- provide support at strategic positions
  35. 35. CHARACTERISTICS OF GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE 5. Pinnacles- a small turret-like termination on top of buttresses, parapets or elsewhere, bunches of foilage called CROCKET 6. Spire- the tapering termination of a tower 7. Gables- Triangular position of wall 8. Piers -clustered pillars were used instead of column 9. Lierne ribs- flame like ribs branching from a main rib
  36. 36. • French word meaning “rebirth” • Considered to be a cultural movement • Rebirth of the art of classic antiquity that occurred in Italy in the 14th C • Successfully adapted in France • Humanism was recognized
  37. 37. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. Florentine • Dante -Dante Alighieri -Philospher, Scholar, Poet - The Divine Comedy
  38. 38. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. Florentine • Petrarch -Francisco Petrarca -Philospher, Poet - Father of Humanism - Father of the Renaissance
  39. 39. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. Florentine • Boccaccio -Giovanni Boccaccio -Poet, Storyteller - Decameron
  40. 40. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. Florentine • Renaissance Architecture -largely inspired by the rediscovery of classical form s and principles Examples: a. Dome of the Cathedral of Florence • Filippo Brunelleschi - Bruneslleschi studied classical architecture in Rome - Architect, Engineer - Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore
  41. 41. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. Florentine • Renaissance Architecture Examples: a. Dome of the Cathedral of Florence • Filippo Brunelleschi - Considered the founder of the Renaissance style - Devised a double shell structure - Gothic principle of construction - Corinthian orders - Pilasters and entablature
  42. 42. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. Florentine • Renaissance Architecture Examples: b. Ospedale Degli Innocenti (Foundling Hospital) - Brunelleschi - Built by Giovanni Medici for the poor, forgotten and homeless - italian banker - founder of Medici Bank - Symmetry of designs
  43. 43. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. Florentine • Renaissance Architecture Examples: c. Palazzo Medici-Ricardi (1444) - Architect Michelozzo under the instruction of Cosimo de Medici -Michelozzo an italian architect & sculptor -Cosimo de Medici known as “Cosimo the Elder” & “Cosimo Pater Patriae” - (16th C.) Michaelangelo added pedimented windows - (17th C.) bought by Ricadi Family
  44. 44. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. Florentine • Renaissance Architecture Examples: d. Palazzo Pitti (AD 1435) - Erected by Luca Pitti, a friend of Cosimo de Medici, is the largest palace in Italy excepting Vatican - Luca Pitti was a florentine banker - Symmetrical plan - Ashlar masonry
  45. 45. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. Florentine • Renaissance Architecture Examples: e. Palazzo Rucellai • Leon Battista Alberti - author, artist, poet, linguist, philosopher, cryptographerr -Renaissance humanist polymath • Superimposed pilasters • Use of 3 different orders: 1. TUSCAN – ground 2. COMPOSITE – second 3. CORINTHIAN – third • Alberti adapted the articulation of the Colisseum
  46. 46. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. High Renaissance – Rome - Less concerned with rational order than the visual effectiveness - Popes -Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael Examples: a. Tempiettto - Donato Bramante (1441-1514) - italian architect - St. Peter’s Basilica - Small temple marked the spot of St. Peter’s crucifixion - More sculptural than architectural in the manner of Greek temples - 15ft in diameter
  47. 47. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. High Renaissance – Rome Examples: b. Capitoline Hill • Campidoglio Rome 1564, Michelangelo - Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni -Sculptural and humanistic -The Place of Senate, Conservatory, Capitoline Museum (overlooking the plazza; in the center stands the statue of Marcus Aurelius) • Political center of Rome in Ancient times
  48. 48. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. High Renaissance – Rome Examples: b. Capitoline Hill • Plazza is an abstraction of the human figure -long ramp=legs -capitoline museum=arms -senator’s palace=head -oval=body -conservatory=arms -statue=navel
  49. 49. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 1. High Renaissance – Rome Examples: c. Villa Capra or Rotonda • Andrea Palladio, Venice -influenced by Roman & Greek Architecture -influenced by Vitruvius • Influenced by Thomas Jefferson’s plan of the White House • Villa Almerico Capra CHARACTERISTIC OF ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ARCHITECTURE 1. Walls – Ashlar Masonry in rusticated finish 2. Skylines – horizontal cornices and balustrades PALAZZO MEDICIRICADI
  50. 50. A. ITALIAN RENAISSANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ARCHITECTURE 3. Doors and Windows – molded architrave of the classic type or pediment in triangular or segmental style 4. Roofs – vaulted ceiling without ribs, dome raised 5. Columns – classic orders 6. Boldness and simplicity in style 7. Fronting narrrow street
  51. 51. B. FRENCH RENAISSANCE - Reigns of Francis I, Francis II, Charles IV, Henry III, Louis XIII Examples: 1. Chateau de Chambord • Domenico da Cortona • landscape, Loire • Elliptical barrel vaulting • Multi-spired chateau
  52. 52. B. FRENCH RENAISSANCE Examples: 2. Palais de Fontainbleu (1528) • Favorite residence of Francis I • Originally a convent • Largest palace of 16th century • Exterior had no unified design
  53. 53. B. FRENCH RENAISSANCE Examples: 3. Palais de Louvre • Paris(1548-1878) • Built on the site of the old gothic chateau • Patterned after an italian palazzo • French character of each sun • Began in reign of Francis I in 1546 to Napoleon III in the 19th century
  54. 54. B. FRENCH RENAISSANCE CHARACTERISTIC OF FRENCH RENAISSANCE ARCHITECTURE 1. Transitional Period – Gothic & Renaissance features to form a picturesque ensemble 2. In Italy – classical horizontality 3. High roofs (MANSART ROOFS) 4. Combinations of classic & medieval mouldings
  55. 55. C. ENGLISH RENAISSANCE - Early Modern Period - William Shakespeare, John Milton, Jon Donne, Katherine Philips 1. Tudor-Elizabethan Period -Tudor (1485-1603) -Elizabethan (1558-1603) Queen Elizabeth I’s reign • Half-Timber Construction - domestic architecture -vertical posts • Ceiling – low exposed beams • Great Hall – medieval castles • Horizontally rather than vertically • Rectangular panelling of the wainscoat • Bay windows • Pargetwork – stucco ceiling treatment • Oriel • Tudor arch
  56. 56. • C. ENGLISH RENAISSANCE 2. Jacobean Style (1603-1649) • Second phase of Renaissance Architecture in England • Named after King James I of England • -pilasters, entablatures, columns were combined with small wood panels panels • -Dada and pedestral motiff
  57. 57. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MANNERIST MOVEMENT 1. Last phase of renaissance 2. 17th century 3. Play with space & volume 4. Exemplified by exaggeration 5. CHIAROSCURO – light & dark surfaces are given importance - invented by Roger de Piles 6. Designs such as: a. cartouche –shield b. bosses – round prostitutions c. lozenges – oval prostitutions d. grosteques – mythological 7. Revolt against classcism -clarity, visibility, stability
  58. 58. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MANNERIST MOVEMENT 1. Last phase of renaissance 2. 17th century 3. Play with space & volume 4. Exemplified by exaggeration 5. CHIAROSCURO – light & dark surfaces are given importance 6. Designs such as: a. cartouche –shield b. bosses – round prostitutions c. lozenges – oval prostitutions d. grosteques – mythological 7. Revolt against classcism -clarity, visibility, stability
  59. 59. • Portuguese word “BAROCO” meaning odd shape, imperfect pearl • Developed in Later Renaissance • Revolt against Classical art • Grandeur • Sensuous richness • Drama • Vitality • Movement • Emotional exuberance
  60. 60. CHARACTERISTICS OF BAROQUE ARCHIETECTURE 1. curves, double curves & diagonal lines 2. Strong contrast of light & shadow 3. Decoration became so abundant *Chiapas, San Cristobal De Las Casa Cathedral 4. Freedom of planning, designing and ornamentation 5. Spirit of artistic impedance 6. Columns w/ twisted shafts (SOLOMONIC COLUMNS) 7. Pediments in scrolled form 8. Carved ornament emphasized by gilding 9. Contorted curves 10. Ostentatious, extravagant *Iglesia de Nostra Senyora de Betlem
  61. 61. A. ITALIAN BAROQUE - Baroque was art born in Rome Examples: a. Saint Peter’s Basillica • façade – Carlo Maderno -swiss-italian architect • plazza – Bernini - Grand entrance Plazza provides sense of unity and order - 234 columns in Tuscan style • Originally Greek cross plan • Exterior – giant order of Corinthian pilaster
  62. 62. A. ITALIAN BAROQUE - Baroque was art born in Rome Examples: a. Saint Peter’s Basillica • Dome of St. Peter – Michelangelo - 3 horizontal zones - Greatest creation of Renaissance lantern, dome, drum, balustrades and statues piled above the gigantic pilasters are awe-inspiring in their massive grandeur. • Baldocchino - Bernini
  63. 63. A. ITALIAN BAROQUE - Baroque was art born in Rome Examples: b. The Fountain of Trevi • Largest & most famous • Designed by Nicola Salvi • 1760 • Planned by Bernini
  64. 64. A. ITALIAN BAROQUE - Baroque was art born in Rome Examples: c. Santa Maria della Salute • Refered to as “La Salute” • Venice, on the grand canal • Octagonal in form • Corinthian columns, scrolled buttresses
  65. 65. B. FRENCH BAROQUE - Baroque entered France on a grand scale at Versaille -Official architecture of the 17th to 18th century -sever, static and classicistic style of Bernini Examples: a. Chateau de Vaux le Vicomte (Vau Lu Vicomte) • For Nicolas Fouquet • Le Vau, 1657 • Steep roof • Classical cupola • Ionic pilasters
  66. 66. B. FRENCH BAROQUE Examples: b. Versaille Palace • Reign of Louis XIV • Park – Andre’ Le Notre • Palace – Mansart and Charles Le Brun • Hunting Lodge (Louis XIII) • Splendid Palace (Louis XIV)
  67. 67. C. ENGLISH BAROQUE - Charles III - Buildings have been characterized by dignity, practicality, consistence unique Examples: a. St. Paul’s Cathedral • London; 1675; Christopher Wren -52 churches in London • Dome is an enlarged version of Tempietto of Bramante • Lower levels were more Palladian • Mother church of the Diocese of London
  68. 68. • • • • • “Rocaille” and “Cocaille” meaning rockwork and shellwork Prominence = Louis XV 18th Century Gay, elegant and refined Lightness , delicay and elaborate ornamentation
  69. 69. CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCOCO ARCHITECTURE 1. Reversal of the feeling of Baroque 2. Light and airy 3. Intimate/delicate 4. Intricate pattern 5. Favorite motif = The cockleshell
  70. 70. Examples: a. Petit Trianon • Made for Madame du Barry/ Marie Antoinette by Gabriel • Small chateau located on the grounds of Palace of Versailles - Used as a private refuge from the formality of courts
  71. 71. Examples: b. The Wies Pilgrimage Church of the Scourged Saviour • Oval rococo church • Dominikus Zimmermann
  72. 72. • Also known as classic revivals • During the reign of Louis XVI
  73. 73. Examples: a. The Madeleine in Paris • Intended as Pantheon • Build by order of Napoleon • Corinthian Columns • Greek Columnal Temple stands on a Roman-style podium • 7” high podium
  74. 74. Examples: b. Church of Les Invalides • Designed by Bruant & Monsart • Remodeled by Le Vau • Greek cross plan with circular chapels • Famous dome derived from St. Peters’
  75. 75. Examples: c. Paris Opera House • 1874 • Charles Garnier • Reflects the taste of Nouveau Riche
  76. 76. Examples: d. Jefferson Monticello, Virginia • influenced by Lord Burlington -18th century english neoclassicist • Influenced by Andrea Palladio -16th century italian architect • Classical in detail and proportion
  77. 77. Examples: e. Cheswick House • Domed italianate villa • Lord Burlington built for himself • 1726
  78. 78. A. Gothic Revival
  79. 79. B. Victorian - middle of 19th century - IRON discovered in Mesopotamia & Egypt Examples: a. Crystal Palace • Joseph Paxton • Iron frames • Glass panels • Wooden sash bars
  80. 80. B. Victorian - middle of 19th century - IRON discovered in Mesopotamia & Egypt Examples: b. The Eiffel Tower • Paris Exhibition of 1889 • 1000 ft. tall • Gustav Eiffel

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