The Mole!

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Presented by Sharon Williams in the ACT2strand at CAST 2010 in Houston, Texas.

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The Mole!

  1. 2. Relating Mass to Numbers of Atoms <ul><li>The Mole! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the amount of a substance that contains as many particles as there are atoms in exactly 12 g of carbon-12 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>or </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the amount of a substance that contains Avogadro’s number of particles </li></ul></ul>
  2. 3. Avogadro’s Number <ul><li>The number of particles in exactly one mole of a pure substance. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>experimentally determined by Avogadro </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 mole = 6.022 136 7 x 10 23 particles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>analogous to 1 dozen of something </li></ul></ul>
  3. 4. Molar Mass <ul><li>The mass of one mole of a pure substance. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Units are g/mol </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Molar mass of an element is equal to the atomic mass of the element in amu. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1 atom of carbon has a mass of 12.01 amu. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1 mole of carbon atoms have a mass of 12.01 g/mol </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Molar mass of a compound is calculated by adding the masses of all elements in the compound. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 5. Mole Conversions <ul><li>If it’s the number of things you wonder, it’s time to use Avogadro’s number! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 mole = 6.022 x 10 23 things </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(“things” can be atoms, molecules, ions, formulas units, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>When you go from moles to mass, use the formula mass to pass! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 mole = formula mass in g </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(find it on the periodic table or add it up) </li></ul></ul>

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