Skilled Transport WorkforceMining and its effect on the SA transport industry
The SA economy andemployment opportunities Projected economic growth: average of 3.25% per annumbetween 2009-10 and 2014-...
Transport and Storage Industryin SA collectively, the occupations directly employ 51,200 people (6.4% of thestate’s workf...
Value of the transport sector According to the Monash Centre of Policy Studies(CoPS), as at 2009-10 the value of the sect...
SA Mining Sector March 2011, DEEWR undertook a national assessment ofthe resource sector professions and associates, and ...
Key occupational mining jobs The key skill and occupational priorities in the sector include: hydraulics, pneumatics, wo...
Mining sector issues andpriorities Productivity drivers and changes in technology are resultingin the need for multi-skil...
CASE STUDY IN THE EYREPENINSULA 7 mines proceed and estimated 2200 on going direct jobs inmining and processing over the ...
Drivers of EmploymentFramework It demonstrates that the supply of and demand for, skilledlabour is influenced at three le...
Drivers of EmploymentFramework
Transport people crisis Poor industry image, low profile which affects ability to attractnew recruits An ageing, predomi...
Strategies for attraction andretention Workforce Planning Business goals Legislation; Policy and procedures; Recruitm...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Skilled Transport Workforce - Mining and it's effect on the SA transport industry

458 views

Published on

Dr. Romana Hutchinson, Executive Officer, TDTSA discusses the expansion of the South Australian mining sector and if it is an opportunity or a threat to the state’s transport and logistics workforce. For more information on the annual South Australia Transport Infrastructure Summit, please visit the conference website http://goo.gl/tX8g5.

Published in: Career, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
458
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Skilled Transport Workforce - Mining and it's effect on the SA transport industry

  1. 1. Skilled Transport WorkforceMining and its effect on the SA transport industry
  2. 2. The SA economy andemployment opportunities Projected economic growth: average of 3.25% per annumbetween 2009-10 and 2014-15. Projected employment growth: average of 1.65% per annumbetween 2009-10 and 2014-15. Projected labour productivity growth: 1.6% per annum from2009-10 and 2014-15. Jobs from economic growth: 69,000 new jobs between 2009-10 and 2014-15. Replacement demand: 94,000 net openings between 2009-10and 2014-15. Total job openings: 163,000 between 2009-10 and 2014-15.
  3. 3. Transport and Storage Industryin SA collectively, the occupations directly employ 51,200 people (6.4% of thestate’s workforce) employment is male dominated (87.4% of total employment) majority of employment is full-time (69.9%) age profile of the workforce is younger than the state average most common qualifications are Certificate III or IV (held by 17.7% ofworkers) three-quarters of the workforce have no post-school qualifications majority (74.2%) of workers are employed in metropolitan Adelaide majority of the Transport & Storage workforce is employed in RoadTransport 59.2 per cent. Unsurprising, the largest share of the Transport & Storage industryworkforce are employed as Road & Rail Drivers.
  4. 4. Value of the transport sector According to the Monash Centre of Policy Studies(CoPS), as at 2009-10 the value of the sector was $3.8billion, representing 5.3% of South Australia’s GrossState Product (GSP).
  5. 5. SA Mining Sector March 2011, DEEWR undertook a national assessment ofthe resource sector professions and associates, and gavethe following ratings of skills shortages: Production Manager Mining (shortage) Mining Engineer (shortage) Petroleum Engineer (shortage) Geologist (shortage) Mine Deputy (shortage)
  6. 6. Key occupational mining jobs The key skill and occupational priorities in the sector include: hydraulics, pneumatics, working in confined spaces, forkliftdriving, rigging, dogging, drilling, fitting, turning, craneoperation, plant and equipment operation, operationsmanagers. The job roles are within transport BUT mainly inconstruction
  7. 7. Mining sector issues andpriorities Productivity drivers and changes in technology are resultingin the need for multi-skilled workers – including dual trades. The mining sector is recruiting and will recruit fromoverseas. There is a concern that young people entering the sector arenot prepared for the realities of living and working at remotesites. National and global competition for labour is resulting in theuse of fly-in fly-out labour Poaching between firms, sectors and regions.
  8. 8. CASE STUDY IN THE EYREPENINSULA 7 mines proceed and estimated 2200 on going direct jobs inmining and processing over the next decade will arise. During the construction phase an additional 4,500 new jobsopenings will be generated. Most positions will require formal training. This is omitting BHP Billiton Olympic Dam project.
  9. 9. Drivers of EmploymentFramework It demonstrates that the supply of and demand for, skilledlabour is influenced at three levels: Macro (government) Micro (industry and employers) Individuals (job seekers and employees)
  10. 10. Drivers of EmploymentFramework
  11. 11. Transport people crisis Poor industry image, low profile which affects ability to attractnew recruits An ageing, predominantly male workforce with a highproportion of the workforce over 45 years of age. Under developed recruitment and retention strategies thatlead to skills and labour shortages Convince enterprises of the return on investment in skillsdevelopment A need to develop career path culture Difficult workplace safety conditions
  12. 12. Strategies for attraction andretention Workforce Planning Business goals Legislation; Policy and procedures; Recruitment and retention; Support mechanisms; Incentives Retention of mature workers by new careers e.g. Trainers Attraction of new entrants.frolm school leavers Attraction of women has been particularly slow for driving andmany barriers still remain Improving the poor industry image in the community

×