Learning from the growth of light
rail in Europe
Nick Campion

05.03.2014
Introduction
•  Growth in light rail
•  UK Case Studies
•  Edinburgh Trams
•  Croydon Trams
•  Docklands Light Railway (DL...
Growth in European light rail
•  Urban structure of European
cities is preventing further
growth in road capacity
•  Cultu...
European growth figures
•  65 cities built new or expanded
light rail systems between 1980
and 2007
•  160 European cities...
UK growth figures
•  222m journeys in
2012/2013
•  40% increase in UK light
rail passenger journeys
since 2004/2005
•  Lon...
Case studies
•  All post 1987
•  Mixture of Light Rail/Tram
•  Different phases of operation
Edinburgh Trams
DLR
Croydon
T...
Edinburgh Trams
•  Owned by Transport for
Edinburgh, operated by
Edinburgh Trams Ltd
•  Construction carried out by
BSC, a...
Challenges
•  Originally scheduled for February 2011 at cost of approximately
£375m
•  Will be completed 3 years late at o...
Problems
•  Extra utility diversion work discovered
•  Contractual disputes in 2009
•  Financial crisis caused phase 1b to...
Positives

•  Large investors have bought
property near Tram route
•  Retailers clustering at Tram
stops
•  Growth in busi...
Lessons learned
•  Insufficient scoping of work prior to project
•  Risk ownership not built in to contract
•  Lack of pro...
Croydon Tramlink
•  Tram system in South London,
opened in 2000
•  Constructed and originally
operated by Tramtrack Croydo...
Market
•  Serves as transport link for people commuting in to London.
•  Carried 30m passengers in 2012/13 over a 28km net...
The future
•  Tram services to increase by 50%
as part of £30m investment
•  4 new Trams to be in service by
2016
•  Addit...
Lessons Learned
•  Integration with other parts of
the transport system key
•  Well integrated with heavy
rail
•  Fully in...
Docklands Light Railway (DLR)
•  Opened in 1987 in East London
•  Owned by Docklands Light Rail Ltd (TfL),
Operated by Ser...
Market
•  Accounted for 45% of all UK light rail journeys in 2012/13
•  Serves the redeveloped Docklands area of London
• ...
Challenges
•  Victim of its own success
•  Increased demand for services
•  Reliability and performance
problems throughou...
Expansion

© Network Rail Consulting

19
Lessons Learned
•  Importance of projecting future growth
•  The need for capacity to meet
increased demand
•  Benefits of...
Europe loves light rail
•  Environment
•  Noise
•  Pollution
•  Aesthetics
•  Logistics
•  Reliable
•  Fixed system
•  Imp...
Key Issues
•  Risk management
•  Understanding and removing risk
•  Planning of work
•  Programme control
•  Monitoring co...
Network Rail approach
Risk management-GRIP
•  8 Stage process to manage
and mitigate risk associated
with delivering proje...
Network Rail approach
Stakeholder engagement-level
crossing experience:
•  What is the issue?
•  How can it be addressed?
...
Conclusion
•  No doubt about the benefits and
popularity of light rail in Europe
•  Ongoing expansion of existing
networks...
Thank you
Nick Campion
T: 0290061267
E: nick.campion@networkrailconsulting.com
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Nick Campion, Network Rail Consulting: Learning from the growth in light rail in Europe

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Nick Campion, Network Rail Consulting delivered this presentation at the 2014 Light Rail conference in Melbourne. Across the globe the conception and delivery of light rail projects has been growing at an incredible rate. Seen as an efficient and sustainable way to alleviate the congestion that cripples the expansion of many key urban zones, light rail is fast becoming a central solution in the evolution of Australia's major urban areas. In order to work towards a congestion free future, it is imperative that federal and state governments support light rail projects.

Light Rail 2014 explored all the possible funding options for light rail projects, while also looking at international case studies, the latest rolling stock, braking technology, among many more. For more information about the event, please visit the conference website: http://www.informa.com.au/lightrailconference

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Nick Campion, Network Rail Consulting: Learning from the growth in light rail in Europe

  1. 1. Learning from the growth of light rail in Europe Nick Campion 05.03.2014
  2. 2. Introduction •  Growth in light rail •  UK Case Studies •  Edinburgh Trams •  Croydon Trams •  Docklands Light Railway (DLR) •  Lessons learned •  Key issues •  Network Rail approach © Network Rail Consulting 2
  3. 3. Growth in European light rail •  Urban structure of European cities is preventing further growth in road capacity •  Cultural and economic change supporting the move to rail •  Old CBDs have been transformed back into functional walking cities © Network Rail Consulting 3
  4. 4. European growth figures •  65 cities built new or expanded light rail systems between 1980 and 2007 •  160 European cities now have light rail •  Metro rail systems have been added or are under construction in many of the larger European cities © Network Rail Consulting 4
  5. 5. UK growth figures •  222m journeys in 2012/2013 •  40% increase in UK light rail passenger journeys since 2004/2005 •  London light rail journeys increased by 80% since 2004/2005 •  Light rail journeys outside London steadily increased by 7% © Network Rail Consulting 5
  6. 6. Case studies •  All post 1987 •  Mixture of Light Rail/Tram •  Different phases of operation Edinburgh Trams DLR Croydon Tramlink © Network Rail Consulting •  Serve different markets •  Mixture of new and existing infrastructure with new technology 6
  7. 7. Edinburgh Trams •  Owned by Transport for Edinburgh, operated by Edinburgh Trams Ltd •  Construction carried out by BSC, a consortium of Bilfinger Berger, Siemens and Spanish tram builder (CAF). •  Designed to improve inner city travel and airport links •  Currently testing operation and safety before going live in May 2014 © Network Rail Consulting 7
  8. 8. Challenges •  Originally scheduled for February 2011 at cost of approximately £375m •  Will be completed 3 years late at over double the cost •  Financial crisis and contractual issues caused revisions and delays to the project •  Final airport transfer 8 minutes longer than shuttle bus © Network Rail Consulting 8
  9. 9. Problems •  Extra utility diversion work discovered •  Contractual disputes in 2009 •  Financial crisis caused phase 1b to be cancelled in April 2009 •  Operating contract with Transdev cancelled in December 2009, replaced by Edinburgh Trams Ltd •  Road closures and safety concerns created further delays during 2011 © Network Rail Consulting 9
  10. 10. Positives •  Large investors have bought property near Tram route •  Retailers clustering at Tram stops •  Growth in business parks •  Expected boost for tourism © Network Rail Consulting 10
  11. 11. Lessons learned •  Insufficient scoping of work prior to project •  Risk ownership not built in to contract •  Lack of programme control •  Need for stakeholder engagement © Network Rail Consulting 11
  12. 12. Croydon Tramlink •  Tram system in South London, opened in 2000 •  Constructed and originally operated by Tramtrack Croydon Ltd •  Bought by TfL for £98m in 2008 •  Operated by Tram Operations Ltd, part of FirstGroup •  It runs on a street track through Croydon and off-street track in other areas •  Uses some former main-line stations © Network Rail Consulting 12
  13. 13. Market •  Serves as transport link for people commuting in to London. •  Carried 30m passengers in 2012/13 over a 28km network •  Serves 7 National Rail stations and has interchange with London Underground and Overground •  Key role in reducing traffic congestion in South London. © Network Rail Consulting 13
  14. 14. The future •  Tram services to increase by 50% as part of £30m investment •  4 new Trams to be in service by 2016 •  Additional platform at Wimbledon station to improve London Underground links •  Projections show there will be 38m passengers carried each year by 2031, a 35 per cent increase on current numbers © Network Rail Consulting 14
  15. 15. Lessons Learned •  Integration with other parts of the transport system key •  Well integrated with heavy rail •  Fully integrated into London travel card •  Less integration with buses •  No park and ride system •  Value of “off the shelf” design •  Existing infrastructure •  Tested rolling stock •  Use of former main line stations © Network Rail Consulting 15
  16. 16. Docklands Light Railway (DLR) •  Opened in 1987 in East London •  Owned by Docklands Light Rail Ltd (TfL), Operated by Serco Docklands •  Runs on new and existing infrastructure •  Uses an automatic train control (ATC) system. •  Trains fitted with ATP •  Covers 34km of track with 45 stations •  Safest railway in UK © Network Rail Consulting 16
  17. 17. Market •  Accounted for 45% of all UK light rail journeys in 2012/13 •  Serves the redeveloped Docklands area of London •  Connects to the North, South and West of the city including the central financial district via Bank station •  Annual passenger numbers originally 17m, rising to over 86m passengers in 2011 •  Successfully dealt with the increased demand Olympics © Network Rail Consulting 17
  18. 18. Challenges •  Victim of its own success •  Increased demand for services •  Reliability and performance problems throughout the early years •  New technical systems put in place with insufficient time for integration •  Regularly extended © Network Rail Consulting 18
  19. 19. Expansion © Network Rail Consulting 19
  20. 20. Lessons Learned •  Importance of projecting future growth •  The need for capacity to meet increased demand •  Benefits of positive stakeholder management •  Legacy •  London Olympics •  Focus on customer satisfaction © Network Rail Consulting 20
  21. 21. Europe loves light rail •  Environment •  Noise •  Pollution •  Aesthetics •  Logistics •  Reliable •  Fixed system •  Importance of CBD •  Congestion •  Accessibility •  Investment •  Value for money © Network Rail Consulting 21
  22. 22. Key Issues •  Risk management •  Understanding and removing risk •  Planning of work •  Programme control •  Monitoring costs •  Delivering outputs •  Managing contracts •  Connectivity •  Effective integration with other transport modes (financially and physically) •  Stakeholder management •  Building and maintaining relationships © Network Rail Consulting 22
  23. 23. Network Rail approach Risk management-GRIP •  8 Stage process to manage and mitigate risk associated with delivering projects •  Agreed output from each stage •  Stage gate reviews take place at critical points © Network Rail Consulting 23
  24. 24. Network Rail approach Stakeholder engagement-level crossing experience: •  What is the issue? •  How can it be addressed? •  What does the stakeholder want? © Network Rail Consulting 24
  25. 25. Conclusion •  No doubt about the benefits and popularity of light rail in Europe •  Ongoing expansion of existing networks and construction of new systems •  Projects need to be effectively planned, developed and managed © Network Rail Consulting 25
  26. 26. Thank you Nick Campion T: 0290061267 E: nick.campion@networkrailconsulting.com

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