The key to long-term sustainable heavy haul growth – New market paradigms

376 views

Published on

Dr Jan Havenga, Director, Centre for Supply ChainManagement, from Stellenbosch University has presented at the Heavy Haul Rail Africa. If you would like more information about the conference, please visit the website: www.railconferences.com/heavyhaulrail/africa

Published in: Business, Travel
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
376
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The key to long-term sustainable heavy haul growth – New market paradigms

  1. 1. The key to long-term sustainable heavy haul growth –New market paradigms6 November 2012Jan Havengajanh@sun.ac.za
  2. 2. Where  in  the  world  are  we  •  Key  stats  of  South  Africa:    GDP  of  $360  billion    Popula=on  of  50  million    Tons  of  1.6  billion    Tonne-­‐kms  of  378  billion    Cost  of  freight  transport  R180  billion  ($21.6  billion)    Cost  of  Logis=cs  R339  billion  ($40.8  billion)  2  
  3. 3. Logis1cs  costs  as  a  percentage  of  GDP  declined  in  2010    194      213      234      259      317      339      323      339    0%  2%  4%  6%  8%  10%  12%  14%  16%  18%    -­‐          50      100      150      200      250      300      350      400    2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Rand  billion    Total  Logis=cs  cost     %  of  GDP  
  4. 4. But  the  largest  component,  transport,  grew  markedly  R101bn51.8%R110bn51.6%R121bn51.7%R133bn51.5%R167bn52.6%R171bn50.4%R155bn48.0%R180bn53.2%R31bn16.1%R34bn16.0%R36bn15.5%R39bn15.2%R46bn14.5%R48bn14.3% R49bn15.2%R50bn14.6%R36bn18.7%R40bn18.7%R43bn18.7%R48bn18.6%R52bn16.4%R57bn16.8% R58bn17.9%R60bn17.8%R26bn13.4%R29bn13.6%R33bn14.1%R38bn14.7%R52bn16.5%R63bn18.6% R61bn18.9%R49bn14.4%0204060801001201401601802002202402602803003203403603804002003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Rand  billion  Inventory  carrying  cost   Management,  admin  &  profit  Storage  and  ports     Transport  Transport  cost  is  now  53%  of  logis1cs  costs  –  the  highest  ever  
  5. 5. South  Africa  is  a  transport  hungry  country  with  spa1al  challenges  •  South  Africa’s  transport  demand  and  GDP  output  in  rela=on  to  global  demand  and  output  5  Transport  demand  is  rela1vely  higher  than  the  rest  of  the  world  Source:    In  2004  the  world  produced  about  49  000  Mt  CO2    -­‐  equivalent  of  which  South  Africa  emied  440  Mt  CO2  –  equivalent  roughly  1%  -­‐Scenario  Building  Team  (SBT)  2007  ,  Jones,  T.Rodrigue,  J.P.,  Gielen,    D.  0.4%  1%  2%  0.0%  0.5%  1.0%  1.5%  2.0%  2.5%  GDP   CO2  emissions   Surface  freight  tonkm  RSA  as  %  of  world  figure  
  6. 6.  -­‐          5      10      15      20      25      30    Norway  Switzerland  Japan  Denmark  Ireland  United  Kingdom  Iceland  Belgium  France  Greece  Italy  Austria  Germany  Sweden  Luxembourg  Netherlands  Serbia  Spain  Finland  Portugal  Croa=a  Poland  Australia  Slovakia  Mexico  Canada  Czech  Republic  Turkey  Slovenia  Romania  Hungary  Bulgaria  United  States  FYROM  Estonia  Lithuania  South  Africa  Latvia  Montenegro  Russia  GDP  $  per  tonne-­‐km  Transport  produc1vity:  as  an  input  –  it  must  be  low  With  low  transport  produc1vity  –  due  to  excessive  demand  and  inefficient  supply  Source:  OECD,  Trading  Economics,  Bambulyak  and  Frantzen,    US  DOT  Efficient  transport  supply  strategies  as  a  na=onal  objec=ve  Highly  service  dependant  Efficient  supply  chains  Low  spa=al  challanges  Transport  as  a  strategic  resource  Transport  demand  management  
  7. 7. Transport  produc1vity:  as  an  input  –  it  must  be  low    -­‐          5      10      15      20      25      30    NorwaySwitzerlandJapanDenmarkIrelandUnitedIcelandBelgiumFranceGreeceItalyAustriaGermanySwedenLuxembourgNetherlandsSerbiaSpainFinlandPortugalCroatiaPolandAustraliaSlovakiaMexicoCanadaCzechTurkeySloveniaRomaniaHungaryBulgariaUnitedStatesFYROMEstoniaLithuaniaSouthAfricaLatviaMontenegroRussiaGDP  $  per  tonne-­‐km  Low  transport  produc1vity  –  due  to  excessive  demand  and  inefficient  supply  Source:  OECD,  Trading  Economics,  Bambulyak  and  Frantzen,    US  DOT  
  8. 8. Consider  the  underlying  cost  drivers  0  2  4  6  8  10  12  14  16  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  2010  2011  2012  Interset  rate  (in%)  Prime  Rate    -­‐          2.00      4.00      6.00      8.00      10.00      12.00    Cost  (in  Rand)  Diesel  We  have  to  consider  these  risks,  and  the  trade-­‐off  between  them  
  9. 9. The  price  of  crude  has  been  impossible  to  predict  0.00  10.00  20.00  30.00  40.00  50.00  60.00  70.00  80.00  90.00  100.00  1981  1982  1983  1984  1985  1986  1987  1988  1989  1990  1991  1992  1993  1994  1995  1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  2010  2011  $  per  barrel  US  crude  oil  prices  (current)  9  But  the  trend  undeniable  
  10. 10. Quo  vadis  the  fuel  price  –  consider  “reputable  forecasts  of  a  decade  ago       2010   2020  US  Dept  of  Energy  (March  2001)   42   44  Intern.  Energy  Agency  (Jul  2001)   42   56  Natural  Resources  Canada  (Jan  2000)   42   42  World  Bank  (Apr  2000)   28              Standard  &  Poor  (Oct  2000)   38   42  Wharton  Econometrics  (Feb  2000)   38   40  Petroleum  Economics  (Feb  2000)   28      Deutche  Bank  (Jan  2001)   34   36  10  At    current  prices  Source:  Marian  Radetzki,  9th  Interna=onal  Energy  Conference  &  Exhibi=on  –  Energex,  2002  held  in  Krakow,  Poland  between  19-­‐24  May,  2002  
  11. 11. The  conspiracy  theorists  are  having  a  field  day…  •  A  strong  believe  that  we  are  not  being  told  the  truth  about  reserves  •  This  will  ensure  that  the  switch  to  renewables  are  “held  back”  to  the  last  moment  –  maximising  advantages  to  net  suppliers  •  This  seemed  like  conspiracy  theories  •  “The  rhetoric  of  ‘proven  oil  reserves’  are  supposed  to  reassure  us”,  and  •  “Many  of  these  authorita=ve  oil  figures  are  a  decep=ve  form  of  make-­‐believe”  Michio  Kaku:  Physics  of  the  future      11  But  who  said?  
  12. 12. “Opec  believed  to  overstate  oil  reserves  by  70%”  •  “Global  oil  prices  are  expected  to  drama=cally  spike  from  the  end  of  the  decade”  •  “We  now  know  that  the  numbers  are  significantly  inflated”  •  “Stated  reserves  skyrocketed  from  878-­‐billion  barrels  to  1.2-­‐trillion  barrels  throughout  the  1980s  and  1990s,  without  any  new  significant  discoveries  being  made.”    •  “With  cumula=ve  oil  produc=on  of  449-­‐billion,  the  true  reserves  for  Opec  could  be  as  low  as  428.94-­‐billion,  which  would  result  in  global  price  shocks  by  2020  Oil,  gas  and  mining  analysts  Rick  Nariani  and  Brent  Giles  Lux  research  Engineering  News  4  October  2012  12  Everybody  will  suffer  –  South  Africa  because  of  spa1al  challenges  and  demand  side  problems,  will  suffer  rela1vely  more  
  13. 13. Specialisa1on  drives  the  global  phenomenon  –  Global  GDP  traded  13    -­‐          10      20      30      40      50      60     1820  1826  1832  1838  1844  1850  1856  1862  1868  1874  1880  1886  1892  1898  1904  1910  1916  1922  1928  1934  1940  1946  1952  1958  1964  1970  1976  1982  1988  1994  2000  2006  Exports  as  %  of  world  GDP  I  was  born  University  First  job  
  14. 14. Poten1al  impact  of  logis1cs  costs  14  Logis1cs  costs  (Rand  billion)  %  of  GDP  13.8%   14.8%   17.4%   27.1%  
  15. 15. The  GDP  transport  input  rela1onship  is  not  always  well  understood  •     15  But  
  16. 16. On  the  upstream  side  transport  o`en  enables  –  throughput  is  the  key  •  Commodi=es  without  low  cost  heavy  haul  is  dirt  –  it  open  doesn’t  flow  •  In  comes  the  heavy  haul  engineer.  Without  him/her  nothing  flows  •  Heavy  haul  by  nature  is  cheap  •  The  mantra  is  “throughput”  16  and  
  17. 17. On  the  downstream  side  transport  is  inevitable  –  we  want  “cost-­‐effec1ve  throughput”  •  High  value  stuff  will  always  flow  •  But  is  =me  sensi=ve  •  In  comes  the  logis=cian.  Tradi=onal  focus  on  lower  inventory  costs  •  Predictable,  fast,  door-­‐to-­‐door  •  Do  we  need  the  heavy  haul  engineer?  •  When  will  the  folly  of  misunderstanding  the  future  inventory/transport  trade-­‐off  catch  up  with  us?  17  But  
  18. 18. We’re  stuck  with  this  version  of  heavy  haul…  18  Source:    Rapport,  31  July  2011  Is  this  a  train?  Definitely  not  effec1ve.  This  can  be  done  cheaper  
  19. 19. Flows  as  a  result  of  economic  structure  –  it  informs  the  basics  of  segmenta1on  Extrac=on    (Mining  &  Agriculture)  (Primary)  Beneficia=on  (Manufacturing)  (Secondary)  Consump=on  (Private  households)  Mining:  Compete  globally  (efficient  conveyor  belts)  Agriculture:  Rural  access  Industry:  Efficient  connec=on  of  large  produc=on  facili=es  Distribu=on:  Efficient  connec=on  of  distribu=on  facili=es  Primary   Secondary   Ter=ary  Logis=cs  Challenges  Services  (Energy,  construc=on,  trade,  transport,  professional,  community)  (Ter=ary)  Economic  Sectors  of  Ac=vity  
  20. 20. Segmenta1on  is  based  on  the  supply  chain  structure  of  an  economy  20  Extrac1on  Intermediate  Manufacturing  Consump1on  Final  Manufacturing  Agriculture   Road:  R25     Rail:  <R1  Road:  R17  Rail:  R2  Road:  R71  Rail:  R1  Mining   Road:  R34     Rail:  R4  Mining  Road:  R4    Rail:  R9  Agriculture  Road:  R3    Rail:  <R1  Agriculture  Road:  R2    Rail:  <R1  Mining  Road:  R7    Rail:  <R1  Road:  R4  Rail:  R1  Road:  R6  Rail:  <R1  Road:  R3  Rail:  <R1  Road:  R9  Rail:  <R1  Domes=c  Exports  Imports  Tonkm  Road  Rail  (Road  Cost  /  Rail  Cost)  In  billions  
  21. 21. Segmenta1on  is  based  on  the  supply  chain  structure  of  an  economy  21  Extrac1on  Intermediate  Manufacturing  Consump1on  Final  Manufacturing          Domes=c  Exports  Imports  Tonkm  Road  Rail  (Road  Cost  /  Rail  Cost)  In  billions  1764105 7419 7210
  22. 22. Export  Mining  Flows  Domes=c  Mining  Intermediate  Manufacturing  Finished  Palle=zed  Goods  Rural  Extrac=on  and  Delivery  Pit  to  Port:  Iron  Ore   Pit  to  Port:  Coal   Pit  to  Port:  Manganese   Pit  to  Port:  Other  Mining  Exports  Pit  to  Plant:  Iron  Ore   Pit  to  Plant:  Coal   Pit  to  Plant:  Manganese   Pit  to  Plant:  Domes1c  Mining  Plant  to  Plant/DC:  Long  Distance   Plant  to  Plant/DC:  Short  Distance  DC  to  DC:  Long  Distance   DC  to  DC:  Short  Distance  Rural  Agricultural:  Extrac1on   Rural  Agricultural:  Manufacturing  Delivery   Rural  Interchanges  Rail  Market  share  per  segment  100%   99%   92%   62%  92%   63%   96%   10%  19%   4%  2%   1%  18%   1%   4%  Requires:  Capacity  building  Requires:  Capacity  building  Requires:  Improved  opera=on  and  service  deliverables  Requires:  New  market  development  Requires:  Ringfencing  and  subsidy  
  23. 23. But  compare  rail  actual  flows,  with  the  flow  of  commodity  value  –  enabling  growth  is  great  •  Rail  freight  in  tons   •  Value  of  total  freight  =  Transported  tons  x  value  per  ton  •  Note:  all  commodi=es  included  (including  export  coal  ,  iron  ore  and  magnesium)  2  growth  lines  are  almost  en1rely  on  rail,  whilst  2  efficiency  lines  are  currently  only  on  road  –  it  is  not  efficient  
  24. 24. And  high  volumes  of  freight  is  uni1sable  24  •  Top  10  uni=sable  commodity  groups:    Commodity  group      Corridor  ton-­‐km  (in  billions)    Total    ton-­‐km  (in  billions)    Processed  Foods     19     24      Beverages      7     9      Fuel  &  Petroleum  Products      6     8      Other  Chemicals      6     7      Cement      2     4      Non-­‐Metallic  Mineral  Products      3     4      Iron  &  Steel      3     3      Wood  &  Wood  Products      3     3      Paper  &  Paper  Products      2     3      Fer=lizer      2     3    
  25. 25. There  is  enough  rail  friendly  freight  on  corridors    (that  is  not  on  rail)  Corridor   Uni=sable  freight    ton-­‐km  (in  billion)    CapeCor   14      Natcor   9      Richcor   3      Southcor   2      SouthEast  Corridor   2      Eastcor   1      Northcor   1    25  
  26. 26. The  typical  FMCG  long  distance  supply  chain  has  natural  “catchment”  areas    26  DC   DC  M   R  M   R  DC   DC  M   R  M   R  DC   DC  M   R  M   R  
  27. 27. And  logis1cs  hubs  should  form    27  DC   DC  M   R  M   R  DC   DC  M   R  M   R  DC   DC  M   R  M   R  Terminal  Terminal  Natural  Logis1cs  Hub   Natural  Logis1cs  Hub  
  28. 28. The  Intermodal  opportunity  is  large  –  and  highly  concentrated  28    -­‐          5      10      15      20      25    Intermodal   Cape  and  Natal  Intermodal  Tons  (million)  /  Tonkms  (billion)  Tons  (millions)  Tonkm  (billions)  Rail  Tons  (millions)  Rail  Tonkm  (billions)  
  29. 29. 29  20  22  24  26  28  30  32  34  36  2000   2001   2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007   2008   2009  Domes1c  intermodal  containers  as  percentage  of  total  intermodal  •  Other  markets  (bulk  and  non-­‐containerised  break-­‐bulk)  grow  slower  than  intermodal  •  Raw  materials  are  more  suscep=ble  to  economic  cycles  •  Intermodal  containers’  contents  are  worth  more  (therefore  have  a  lower  price  elas=city)  •  Exports  are  also  more  exposed  to  global  economic  cycles  •  A  definite  solu=on  to  target  USA  domes1c  intermodal  grew  from  a  quarter  to  a  third  of  total  intermodal  US  domes1c  container  traffic  moves  totalled  3.96  million  in  2009  and  represented  approximately  33.9%  of  the  total  moves  and  increased  by  2.9%  from  2008  Source:    Intermodal  Associa5on  of  North  America  (IANA)  
  30. 30. Great  Britain  Domes1c  Intermodal  Rail  Freight  Ac1vity,  1999  –  2009  is  significant  30  Source:  Freight  Modal  Choice  Study:  Addressable  Markets,  Department  for  Transport,  UK,  2010    15%  18%  20%  23%  25%  28%  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  1999   2000   2001   2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007   2008   2009  Freight  Moved  (billion  tonne  km)  Freight  Moved  (Billion  tonne  km)   %  of  total  rail  freight  ac=vity  Linear(Freight  Moved  (Billion  tonne  km))   Linear(%  of  total  rail  freight  ac=vity)  
  31. 31. The  greatest  addressable  markets  for  UK  rail  are  intermodal  –  with  domes1c  intermodal  the  most  lucra1ve  opportunity    Great  Britain  Industry  10  Year  Forecast  (2005  –  2015)  Commodity   Minimum  Growth  Es=mate   Maximum  Growth  Es=mate  Coal   -­‐8%   9%  Metals   12%   39%  Ore   -­‐5%   -­‐3%  Construc=on   20%   45%  Waste   -­‐9%   14%  Petroleum  &  Chemicals   4%   5%  Channel  Tunnel   200%   266%  Domes=c  Intermodal*   177%   838%  Mari=me  Containers   42%   83%  Auto   25%   76%  Total   26%   28%  31  Source:  Freight  Modal  Choice  Study:  Addressable  Markets,  Department  for  Transport,  UK,  2010    *  From  a    low  base  
  32. 32. Europe  total  intermodal  rail/road  transport    2005  –  2009  also  supports  the  argument  32  %  Change  Intermodal  Market  Segment   2007  -­‐  2009   2005  -­‐  2009  Domes=c  Services   -­‐5.5%   19.3%  Interna=onal  Services   -­‐13.6%   14.6%  All  Services   -­‐9.1%   17.3%  Source:  Interna5onal  Union  of  Railways.  (2010).  Report  on  Combined  Transport  in  Europe  
  33. 33. An  interes1ng  case  study  –  the  Malcolm  Group  (Scotland)  33  
  34. 34. In  Europe  the  turnaround  to  rail  will  con1nue  to  be  targeted  Source:    TRANSvisions  (2009)  Study  on  Transport  Scenarios  with  a  20  and  40  Year  Horizon,  Service  contract  A2/78  2007  for  the  DG  TREN,  Task  2  Report  “Quan5ta5ve  Scenarios”  34  Growth  in  tonne-­‐km  from  2005  up  to    2050  0%  20%  40%  60%  80%  100%  120%  140%  160%  180%  200%  Rail   Mari=me   Road   Total  %  Growth  
  35. 35. In  South  Africa  this  can  only  be  achieved  by  entering  the  dominant  market  segment  –  DC  to  DC  FMCG  heavy  intermodal  In  the  USA  rail  also  concentrated  on  corridor  transport,  while  in  South  Africa  the  reverse  is  true  35    -­‐          50      100      150      200      250    1990  1991  1992  1993  1994   1995  1996  1997   1998  1999  2000  2001  2002  2003  2004   2005  2006  2007   2008  2009  Indexed  (1990)  USA  rail  USA  road  SA  rail    SA  road  
  36. 36. South  African  view,  of  now  and  the  future  36  Current  freight  flows  
  37. 37. South  African  view,  of  now  and  the  future  37  Expected  freight  flows  –  30  years  in  the  future  
  38. 38. The  downstream  road  evangelist  is  talking…  Engineering  News  2  September  2005  and  13  September  2006:  •  Marsay,  who  is  regarded  as  something  of  a  roads  evangelist:    –  having  worked  on  big  transport-­‐policy  mapers  in  the  UK  before  reloca1ng  to  South  Africa,    –  argues  that  a  new  dedicated  freight-­‐only  highway  would  cost  some  R15-­‐billion  over  10  years,  and  would    add  36-­‐million  tons  of  capacity  to  the  route.  •  “New  freight  capacity  can  be  created  four  1mes  more  efficiently  in  the  road  mode  rather  than  in  rail,”  Marsay  said.  •   
  39. 39. But  let  us  assume  a  liple  case  study…  •  Demand  60  million  tons  •   ATD    600  kilometres  •  Rail  friendly  30  million  tons    -­‐    palle1sable,  containerisable,  uni1zable  freight  •  Current  rail  cost  tariff  ~  35c  t/km  and  road  ~  50c  t/km  (rail  includes  infrastructure  charges  and  road  only  par1ally)  •  If  this  demand  triples  •  And  the  fuel  price  triples  The  answer  is  1Time  –  as  an  economy  in  general  Where  are  we  
  40. 40. 40  The  Real  solu=on  Lower  the  R70  Billion  spent  on  road  transport  of  finished  products  Rather  than  adding  value  to  dirt  -­‐  or  both  -­‐  you  decide  For  this  we  need  the  heavy  haul  engineer  We  must  manage  downstream  demand  Relocalise  Reverse  interna=onal  trade  growth  Turn  hyper  specialisa=on  around  Recycle  100%  and  preferably  at  source  (3D  prin=ng?)  Reduce  average  transport  distance  We  must  have  efficient  supply  Renewable  transport  energy  All  Long  distance  freight  on  rail  High  carbon  footprint  commodi=es  will  not  sell  Freight  supply  will  be  efficient  Intermodal  Rela=ve  mari=me  intermodal  will  decline  Rela=ve  domes=c  intermodal  will  grow  I.e.  shorter  distance  intermodal  containers  heavy  haul  will  move  from  ship  to  rail.  Einstein  observed  that  our  belief  of  being  “separate”  is  an  illusion.  It  imprisons  our  thinking  –  and  enslaves  us  to  a  future  without  vision  He  also  said,  “I  never  worry  about  the  future,  it  comes  soon  enough.”  

×