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What shapes how academic librarians think about their instruction? And why does it matter? - Houtman

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What shapes how academic librarians think about their instruction? And why does it matter? - Houtman

  1. 1. Eveline Houtman Coordinator, Undergraduate Library Instruction Robarts Library April 5, 2018 What shapes how academic librarians think about their instruction? And why does it matter?
  2. 2. Reporting on qualitative research Practitioner Researcher Insider Outsider PhotoJeffHitchcockviaFlickr
  3. 3. How do we think about our instruction? ACRL, 2008; rescinded 2016
  4. 4. How do we think about our instruction? • teaching • training • presentation/public speaking • database demo • “not just where to click”1 • performance • facilitation • coaching • nurturing • guide-on-the-side vs. sage- on-the-sage • co-investigation with our students of the political, social, and economic aspects of information2 • involves skills/concepts/big ideas/critical thinking/ lifelong learning… • learner-centered pedagogy, feminist pedagogy, critical pedagogy… • ACRL Standards/ACRL Framework/SCONUL Seven pillars, ANCIL… 1. Swanson & Jagman (2015). 2. Tewell (2016).
  5. 5. How do we think about its place in our work? “Instruction comes with the job. I wish I was better at it.” “Teaching is everything. It’s the bedrock of what I do.” “We do instruction if we’re asked. We don’t need to talk about it.” “Library instruction has nothing to do with me or my work.” “I do identify as a teacher. A teacher and a librarian.” What librarians say:
  6. 6. How do we think about its place in our work? “Instruction comes with the job. I wish I was better at it.” “Teaching is everything. It’s the bedrock of what I do.” “We do instruction if we’re asked. We don’t need to talk about it.” “Library instruction has nothing to do with me or my work.” “I do identify as a teacher. A teacher and a librarian.” What librarians say: “My library really values teaching. Well, we’re in a teaching institution.” “They say they support teaching, but it’s lip service. They’re taking away resources.” “Teaching is valued but not understood.” What they say about their library admin:
  7. 7. What does the education literature say? Terminology: assumptions, conceptions, attitudes, perspectives, theories of practice, personal practical knowledge… teacher beliefs Review of 600+ empirical articles: “the pervasive conviction in the literature, schools, and teacher education programs is that teachers’ beliefs matter.”3 beliefs affect motivation, teacher learning, teaching actions, adoption of change initiatives 3. Fives & Buehl (2012).
  8. 8. An ecological model “Individuals are embedded in and significantly affected by several nested ecosystems.”4 4. Woolfolk Hoy, Davis, & Pape (2006).
  9. 9. What I did in my research Recruitment: “I’m looking to recruit academic teaching librarians from a variety of geographic locations and institution types from the United States and Canada. Please consider participating in my research if: • you feel instruction (in-person, online, blended) is an important part of your work; • you take a reflective approach to your teaching; • you like talking about your teaching practice!” 12 participants
  10. 10. What I did in my research Data collection: Two interviews each • Interview 1 – focused on the participants’ experiences and contexts • Interview 2 – focused on the participants’ teaching. They were asked to come prepared to talk about a specific class they taught and optionally to provide teaching materials.
  11. 11. Ecological model: Teaching librarians
  12. 12. Ecological model: Teaching librarians Self Personal identity Personal values Teacher identity Prior teaching experience Education Self as student Professional learning Reflection Devaluing of higher ed Corporatization of institutions Teaching & learning Today’s students Attacks on the public good Political polarization (U.S.) Information environment (e.g. fake news) Diversity Info lit frameworks Professional values LIS literature Associations/ networks Students Faculty Colleagues Institutional culture Admin Space Librarians’ teaching culture Professional development Academic discipline
  13. 13. Vicki Self - Extrovert - Recently completed a Ph.D. in LIS - Identifies as a “library faculty member” more than a teacher Devaluing of higher ed => Funding Teaching & learning Today’s students Political polarization (U.S.) Info lit frameworks LIS literature Students Colleagues Institutional culture Admin Librarians’ teaching culture Professional development - 30+ years experience - Mid-size state university in the Midwest U.S., with a teaching focus - Reference & instruction librarian Faculty
  14. 14. Ben Self - Prior non-traditional teaching experience - Bachelor of Education Corporatization of institutions Teaching & learning Today’s students (Info lit Frameworks) Professional Values => Service Students Faculty Colleagues Institutional culture Academic discipline - New librarian - Very large polytechnic, Canada - Business librarian/E- learning - Informal lead for info lit ACRL listserv
  15. 15. Stephanie Self - 10 years teaching fitness classes - Teaching in the family - Strong IL instruction program at her library school - Internship doing IL instruction Teaching & learning Information environment (e.g. fake news) Info lit frameworks Professional values LIS literature Associations/ networks Students Faculty (Colleagues) Institutional culture Admin Space Librarians’ teaching culture Professional development - New librarian - Very large public research university, Southern U.S. - Subject librarian BOSS
  16. 16. Cameron Self - “Teaching is everything.” - Became a librarian in order to teach - “Coach Cameron” - Queer – sees themself as a role model for students Devaluing of higher ed Corporatization of institutions Teaching & learning Today’s students Attacks on the public good Political polarization (U.S.) Information environment (e.g. fake news) Diversity Info lit frameworks Professional values LIS literature Associations/ networks Students Faculty - Mid-career librarian - Small private women’s college, Northeast U.S. - Liaison librarian, Instructional technology librarian
  17. 17. Implications • Professional education • Professional development • Professional learning
  18. 18. Reflection Reflexive turn in the LIS literature
  19. 19. References Association of College and Research Libraries. (2008). Standards for proficiencies for instruction librarians and coordinators. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/profstandards.pdf Deitering, A.-M., Stoddart, R. A., & Schroeder, R. (Eds.). (2017). The self as subject: Autoethnographic research into identity, culture, and academic librarianship. Chicago, IL: Association of College and Research Librarians. Fives, H., & Buehl, M. M. (2012). Spring cleaning for the “messy” construct of teachers’ beliefs: What are they? Which have been examined? What can they tell us? In K. R. Harris, S. Graham, T. Urdan, S. Graham, J. M. Royer, & M. Seidner (Eds.), APA educational psychology handbook, Vol. 2: Individual differences and cultural and contextual factors. (pp. 471–499). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. http://doi.org/10.1037/13274-000 Swanson, T. A., & Jagman, H. (Eds.). (2015). Not just where to click: Teaching students how to think about information. Chicago, IL: Association of College and Research Libraries. Tewell, E. (2016). Putting critical information literacy into context: How and why librarians adopt critical practices in their teaching. In the Library with the Lead Pipe. Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2016/putting-critical-information-literacy-into-context- how-and-why-librarians-adopt-critical-practices-in-their-teaching/ Woolfolk Hoy, A., Davis, H., & Pape, S. J. (2006). Teacher knowledge and beliefs. In P. A. Alexander & P. H. Winne (Eds.), Handbook of educational psychology (2nd ed., pp. 715–737). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  20. 20. Eveline Houtman eveline.houtman@utoronto.ca Twitter: @EvelineLH Questions?

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