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Waking up webinars: bringing active learning online - Lemke

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Waking up webinars: bringing active learning online - Lemke

  1. 1. Dorothea Lemke Technical University of Munich University Library Lilac 2017, Swansea April 11, 2017 Waking up webinars Bringing active learning online
  2. 2. 2Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Previous webinar experience – scenario 1 Image: https://pixabay.com/de/hund-yorkshire-terrier-fauler-hund-200942/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  3. 3. First scenario • Lecture followed by questions via chat. • Sometimes little polls in between that check whether participants have understood what had been presented. • Duration 15 to 60 minutes. • Participants are very passive. • Topics are often covered superficially. 3 Previous webinar experience – scenario 1 Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  4. 4. 4Schulungsteam (TUM) | Universitätsbibliothek Previous webinar experience – scenario 2 Image: https://pixabay.com/de/stau-new-york-taxi-manhattan-chaos-1590167/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  5. 5. Second scenario • Very active webinar: participants are encouraged to use their microphones, to ask questions and share their experience. There are polls and discussions via chat. • (+) Participants can participate actively. • (-) There is too much activity / distraction such as:  Lots of background noises from different microphones, because many participants don’t mute their microphones.  Lots of movement from different webcams.  Lots of discussions in the chat during the presentation, part of them are private topics.  => Hard to follow the presenter with so much else happening at the same time. Bottom line I wanted to encourage participants to participate actively, but still keep a calm and concentrated learning environment. 5 Previous webinar experience – scenario 2 Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  6. 6. Outline 1. Initial situation and aim 2. Engaging participants 3. Webinars - pros & cons 4. 10 lessons learnt 6Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  7. 7. 7 Where we started Munich: Main Campus Munich => Garching: approx. 12 miles Munich => Freising approx. 25 miles Munich => Straubing: approx. 87 miles Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  8. 8. • Today the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has approx. 40.000 students and 10.000 members of staff, spread over 4 campuses (Munich, Garching, Freising, Straubing). • The university library is responsible for providing all campuses with information literacy courses. • In 2013 when the project started we had an IL team of 8 people, 4.5 FTE. • Today we have 12 colleagues, 6.5 FTE, with 2 vacancies waiting to be filled for IL training. • In 2013 the university library offered 8 different standard courses on information literacy and reference management programmes. • Our clients are students, staff members, high school students and high school teachers. 8 Where we started Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  9. 9. • Different campuses received different standards of training services. • It varied between 2 courses a year and 8 courses 8-12 times a year.  In Munich (main campus) we offered regular classes; approx. 4-6 scheduled courses of each course type each semester.  In Garching we offered each course type once a semester. Courses often have to be cancelled because they were undersubscribed – despite the fact that Garching is the campus with the highest number of students at TUM.  In Freising we offered each course type once or twice a semester. Some of them were held by local library staff, some by colleagues travelling from Munich.  In Straubing, our most distant campus, we offered 2 courses once a year. These courses were held by staff members travelling from Munich. Training computers had to be brought from Munich which was very time-consuming. • Although the courses were well rated by participants it was hard to reach students and staff members and get them to come to our courses. • To sum up: We had 4 campuses with very different level of training services and problems in attracting our clients to come to our courses. 9 Where we started Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  10. 10. 10Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Idea and aim Image: © Risager - Flickr.com, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  11. 11. Aim: • Provide far-away campuses with more regular courses and a wider course range. • Reach students and research staff we have not been able to reach so far. Obstacles: • Not enough staff to offer all course types at every campus regularly. • Participants` learning habits and media usage behaviour had changed. The expectation to get everything delivered to their own screen was increasing. Ideas & Considerations: • Offer courses independent of location. • Bring participants from undersubscribed classes together. • Reduce travelling time. • We already had self-learning courses (e-courses), but customers’ requests showed that there was a need for face-to-face support. • Find a course format that allows us to convey the same content as the classroom course. 11 Idea and aim Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  12. 12. Solution: Webinars • Webinars seemed the logical solution to offer personal support in an online environment. It allows us to:  offer our courses more regularly for all locations.  merge undersubscribed classes from different locations.  save travelling time and personnel resources.  reach clients who wouldn’t go to the library to attend a course, but are willing to attend a webinar from their own office (especially PhD candidates and research staff). 12 Idea and aim Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  13. 13. 13 An experiment with far reaching impact Image: © Amir Kaljikovic - Fotolia.com
  14. 14. • The experiment started in June 2013 with our first webinar, a webinar for the reference management software Citavi. • We used the video conferencing software Adobe Connect Meeting which is licensed for all German universities by the German Research Foundation. Therefore there was no financial risk involved. • This first webinar received very good feedback, which encouraged us to adapt more courses to the webinar format over the next 2 years, both in German and English. • Today we have 7 different webinars which are an important part of our training programme. Facts & Figures (09.03.2017): • Webinars given in total: 78 • Webinars per semester today: approx. 14 • Webinar participants in total: 1107 14 An experiment with far reaching impact Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  15. 15. Courses adapted to the webinar format today
  16. 16. 16 Webinar setup Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  17. 17. • When you enter the webinar room it contains:  list of participants, chat, presentation area, course outline, webcam of presenters, download area for course materials and a note that asks the participants to check their audio settings • Participants microphones are muted but are activated on request. • The webinar is held by 2 presenters  to offer some change in voice.  to always have one person who can completely concentrate on looking after the questions in the chat while the other can concentrate on the presentation. • All webinars were adapted from already existing classroom courses. • The webinar includes all topics and exercises from the classroom course. • Duration: 2-2,5 hours (always 30 minutes more than the respective classroom course) • Target group: open to everybody, TUM students and staff as well as externals • Minimum number of registered participants today: 10 17 Webinar setup – how we do it Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  18. 18. Schulungsteam (TUM) | Universitätsbibliothek 18 Spicing it up – engaging participants Image: https://pixabay.com/de/gewürze-zimtstangen-geruch-aroma-1914130/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  19. 19. Activity elements in classroom courses and how to adapt them to the webinar setting: • Introduction rounds • Collecting and selecting course topics • Exercises • Group activity • Activating questions • Participants’ questions and shared experience • Evaluation 19 Engaging participants Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  20. 20. 20Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Dropping the mask – introduction rounds Image: https://pixabay.com/de/frau-menschen-mädchen-freundinnen-215844/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  21. 21. Why do we do it? To make every participant speak within the first 5 to 10 minutes. It’s a wake-up call that this is not a course you can sleep through. How do we do it in the classroom course? Short round where everyone gives their name, field of study and shares their experience or questions regarding the courses topic. How do we do it in the webinar? Short round where everyone introduces themselves in the chat. What’s the effect? Wake-up call to participate. Reduces anonymity amongst participants, breaks the ice to use the at the beginning empty chat and makes it their channel of communication. 21 Introduction rounds Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  22. 22. 22 Introduction rounds Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  23. 23. 23Schulungsteam (TUM) | Universitätsbibliothek Curiosity is the best teacher – collecting course topics Image: https://pixabay.com/de/kinder-niedlich-kind-kindheit-646149/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  24. 24. Why do we do it? Because we think that you learn best what you need or are interested in. So we try to teach our participants as much as possible what is relevant to them because they will forget most of everything else. How do we do it in the classroom course? Collect topics and questions on the flipchart or offer predefined topics participants can vote for. How do we do it in the webinar? We use a combination of a multiple choice poll and an open answer poll and create the course according the results. What’s the effect? Participants feel valued because they can ask their questions at the beginning of the course. Knowing their questions will be answered and the course’s topics are relevant to them, they are much more attentive. 24 Collection of course topics Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  25. 25. 25 Collection of course topics Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  26. 26. 26 Exercises – hands on experience Image: https://pixabay.com/de/eisen-amboss-metall-schmied-stahl-1405850/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  27. 27. Why do we do it? We want our participants not only to understand but to enable them to use their knowledge. How do we do it in the classroom course? For each topic there is an exercise to do on your own. Participants set up search strategies, use different search tools or create a reference list using a reference management software. They encounter difficulties and find solutions to these problems which would typically occur at the workplace. How do we do it in the webinar? Same as in the classroom course. They can download the exercise sheet and do the exercises. What’s the effect? The additional benefit is that participants use their own devices. They perform the exercises in their real-life working environment and can solve problems they would otherwise encounter later when they are on their own. 27 Exercises Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  28. 28. 28 Exercises Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  29. 29. 29 Making people think – activating questions Image: https://pixabay.com/de/tier-affe-schwarz-clever-gesicht-17474/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  30. 30. Why do we do it? To make participants think about a topic/get into a topic and discuss their experience. Find out what their level of knowledge is. How do we do it in the classroom course? Collect answers on a flip chart, use raise-hand method or quick-fire round. How do we do it in the webinar? We ask the question in a chat dedicated to this question only or use a poll. What’s the effect? People think about a question and see how the other participants think about it – whether they think along the same lines or have a different approach. Presenters know what level of experience the group has or which operating systems they use. 30 Activating questions Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  31. 31. 31 Activating questions Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  32. 32. 32Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Group activity Image: https://pixabay.com/de/enten-figuren-gruppe-niedlich-süß/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  33. 33. Why do we do it? Get into a topic and discuss their experience. Activate prior knowledge. How do we do it in the classroom course? Put different questions to each group to be discussed. The results are captured on a flip chart which is then presented to the other groups. How do we do it in the webinar? At the moment we are still working on implementing a group activity format. Instead we use activating questions. What’s the effect? It’s a change of mode. Participants exchange ideas, opinions and experience. 33 Group activity Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  34. 34. 34Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Encouraging exchange – participants’ questions and experience Image: https://pixabay.com/deäpfel-geschäft-kaufen-angebot-1841132/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  35. 35. Why do we do it? To answer our participants’ questions. Make them find out about differences and similarities. Understand our participants’ problems and needs, to improve and expand our course programme. How do we do it in the classroom course? Encourage participants and give them time to ask and think about what they need for their work. Encourage them to share their experience and questions. How do we do it in the webinar? Questions are asked via chat, more rarely also via microphone. Simple questions or questions which are only important to the person asking are answered directly in the chat. Questions which are important for all participants are answered via microphone in a dialogue by both presenters - one asking the question, the other answering it. What’s the effect? It makes the webinar more entertaining and lively. It shows our participants that their questions are not stupid but important and part of the learning process and that others benefit from it, too. 35 Participants’ questions and experience Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  36. 36. 36 Participants’ questions and experience Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  37. 37. 37Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Comment symbols - keeping the flock together Image: https://pixabay.com/de/gans-gänse-mädchen-hund-schäfer-908291/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  38. 38. Why do we do it? Keeping the flock together. Making sure everyone can follow, finished an exercise or is ready to proceed with the next topic. How do we do it in the classroom course? Asking, eye contact, observation. How do we do it in the webinar? Participants indicate via comment symbols that they have finished an exercise and are ready to proceed with the next topic. What’s the effect? Shows participants that we expect them to do the exercises and not just wait for the solution. Shows participants their progress and questions matter. Helps the presenters to give participants enough but not too much time to do an exercise. 38 Comment symbols - keeping the flock together Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  39. 39. Schulungsteam (TUM) | Universitätsbibliothek 39 Your opinion matters! – course evaluation Image: http://pixabay.com/de/rückmeldung-stellungnahme-kunde-1977987//, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  40. 40. Why do we do it? To make our participants think about what they’ve learnt. To check if our courses meet our participants’ needs and to find out where we can improve our services. How do we do it in the classroom course? Via an anonymised print evaluation form at the end of each course. How do we do it in the webinar? • Anonymised evaluation via Evasys. Evasys is an online evaluation and survey software used at TUM. • In the webinar room we link to the online evaluation form via the web links pod. • The results can be downloaded as a .csv file to be compared to and stored with the results from the classroom courses. What’s the effect? We show our participants that their opinion matters and that we are trying to improve our services to meet their needs. 40 Evaluation via Evasys Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  41. 41. 41 Evaluation via Evasys Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  42. 42. 42 Evaluation via Evasys Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  43. 43. Whiteboard Can be used by presenters and participants. Question & Answer-Tool Participants ask, presenters answer. Question and answer can only be seen by participants after the question has been answered. Breakout rooms Sub rooms for group work. All participants automatically have presenters rights. Results on white boards etc. can be brought to the main room to be presented or discussed with the whole group. 43 Tools in Adobe Connect we don’t use yet Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  44. 44. 44Schulungsteam (TUM) | Universitätsbibliothek After the webinar Image: https:// pixabay.com/de/mädchen-mann-kind-finnisch-himmel-1434561/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  45. 45. How do we prevent our participants from drowning after the webinar? • Online drop-in sessions • E-mail • Lecture notes • Further training courses and webinars 45 What Happens After the Webinar Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  46. 46. 46Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Upsides and downsides of webinars Image: https://pixabay.com/de/spielzeug-quietschenten-im-wasser-820621/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  47. 47. Webinars … • can be used independent of location. • allow the library to offer a wider course selection to far-off branches. • often prevent undersubscribed courses from being cancelled by merging courses for different locations in one webinar. • reduce travelling time for presenters and participants. • allow to execute exercises in real-life working environment. • reach students, research staff and externals that usually wouldn’t attend a library course. • can be recorded and played back later. • can be certified with confirmation of participation. • allow more participants per webinar than classroom courses. • allow to involve participants actively. 47 Upsides of webinars Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  48. 48. • The participants environment is unknown and uncontrollable – technically as well as distraction wise. • The format is heavily dependent on hard- and software and a good internet connection. • The personnel costs for a single event are higher (two presenters, longer course, longer preparation time). • Many registered participants don’t attend. • Lower return rate for evaluation forms than in classroom courses. 48 Downsides of webinars Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  49. 49. 49Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Something to take home – lessons learnt Image: https://pixabay.com/de/frosch-abschied-reise-koffer-897419/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  50. 50. 1. Always do webinars with two presenters to allow a change of voice, as backup when technical problems occur and to manage the chat. 2. Don’t hold a webinar in your office where colleagues, phones and unfinished tasks distract you. Do it for example in a classroom you book for this purpose only. Preferably this room has a white wall as your background wall. 3. Online there is less tolerance for technical problems. If your equipment doesn’t work your participants are gone. 4. Therefore allow enough time for preparation before the webinar starts as a buffer for minor technical problems. 5. Do all testing before you open the room to your participants. It looks very unprofessional if you start setting up your audio five minutes before the webinar starts and your participants are watching you struggle with technology. We start the set up 1 hour before the webinar starts and open the room to our participants 15 minutes prior. 6. Use high-quality microphones / headsets. It’s really painful to listen to a voice for two and a half hours with bad sound quality. 50 Lessons learnt I Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  51. 51. 7. Don’t let yourself be irritated by participants who are very quiet. Sometimes it’s hard to judge whether your participants are dissatisfied with the course, absent or simply of a more quiet nature and completely content with how things are going. 8. It’s important to give your participants audible directions. Participants get confused when they don’t hear anything. So when you take a break to give your participants the opportunity to do an exercise, communicate clearly that it’s exercise time and that’s why you are not talking. 9. If you want your participants to participate actively, you have to encourage them explicitly to ask questions, share their experience and assess your performance. Only because a chat is available, doesn’t mean they will use it. 10. Take special care to prepare your participants before the webinar. This might be their first webinar. Write an e-mail explaining how a webinar works, what kind of equipment they need and where to meet. Tell them about software they might have to install beforehand or passwords they need to have at hand. 51 Lessons learnt II Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  52. 52. Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library 52 Résumé – It’s a balancing act! Image: https://pixabay.com/de/rumhängen-plüschtiere-kermit-1521445/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  53. 53. It’s a balancing act to … • keep participants active while keeping a calm and concentrated learning environment. • to handle question floods. Especially in the chat it can get messy. Challenges: • Dealing with technical issues before and during the webinar. • Dealing with the lack of commitment of registered participants to attend the webinar. It’s rewarding … • when participants participate actively and you can watch their learning process. • if your participants tell you that you created a great learning atmosphere and that they benefitted a lot. • when participants start to react to each other and start helping each other directly. 53 Résumé – It’s a balancing act! Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  54. 54. Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library Thumbs up – participants’ voices Image: https://pixabay.com/de/geste-daumen-hoch-gute-finger-772977/, published under CC0 1.0 license [Accessed 30.01.2017]
  55. 55. “I would like to point out, that a 2-and-a-half-hour-webinar is very tough - especially for the presenters. Both did a really GREAT JOB! I liked also a lot that it was not just a simple presentation, but that after some minutes of presenter’s talk you switched to an exercise, a pod, or some other activity. Especially for such a long webinar it is vital to keep participants awake (or not drifting to some other activity like checking emails, or so) - ;) Well done also the alternation between the two presenters: it is less tiring listening to different voices (than always the same one) - and less stressful for the presenters themselves (a win-win situation). Furthermore: I appreciate the evaluation via EvaSys and hope that you get feed back from all participants. Also nice that you offered exercises and a script for download since the beginning. All in all a very strong performance! Well done & bravo!” (Webinar participant) 55 Participants’ voices Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library
  56. 56. Contact: Dorothea Lemke - Technical University of Munich E-Mail: dorothea.lemke@ub.tum.de 56 Questions & feedback © Marita Müller / University Library of the Technical University of Munich Dorothea Lemke (TUM) | University Library

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