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Using screen-capture technology to understand health information seeking behaviors and assess e-health literacy - Danielle Carlock

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Presented at LILAC 2016

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Using screen-capture technology to understand health information seeking behaviors and assess e-health literacy - Danielle Carlock

  1. 1. Using screen-capture technology to understand health information seeking behaviors and assess e-health literacy Danielle Carlock Faculty Librarian Scottsdale Community College, AZ, USA d.carlock@scottsdalecc.edu
  2. 2. OVERVIEW • Institutional Profile • Methodology • Results • Next Steps
  3. 3. SCOTTSDALE COMMUNITY COLLEGE INSTITUTIONAL PROFILE • Public, two year college in Scottsdale, AZ, USA • Approximately 10,000 students • Part of the Maricopa Community College District, serving 250,000 students • General education requirements for Associate degree include a Natural Sciences course
  4. 4. FON 241LL COURSE • FON 241LL “Principles of Human Nutrition Laboratory” is a 1 credit course that fulfills the Natural Science requirement • Taken mainly by non-health science majors • Students evaluate their risk for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, type II diabetes, and obesity
  5. 5. eHEALTH LITERACY “The ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic sources and apply the knowledge gained to addressing or solving a health problem.” (Norman and Skinner, 2006)
  6. 6. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY PRETEST (AUGUST) 3 LABS THAT REINFORCED THE SKILLS (SEPT-NOV) POSTTEST (DECEMBER)
  7. 7. PRETEST/POSTTEST METHODOLOGY • Before and after instruction students were given two searching prompts: 1. A personal health information need 2. An academic health information need • Searches screen-captured using Panopto • Searches scored against rubrics
  8. 8. SCHOLARLY INFORMATION PROMPT & RUBRIC Prompt: Your nutrition instructor has assigned a research paper on the role of nutrition in type II diabetes. Locate one scholarly source on the role of nutrition in type II diabetes. Rubric (5 points): CRITERIA NO YES ARTICLE IS SCHOLARLY 0 2 ARTICLE IS RESEARCH ARTICLE 0 2 ARTICLE IS RELEVANT 0 0.5 ARTICLE IS CURRENT 0 0.5
  9. 9. OVERALL RESULTS-SCHOLARLY PRETEST MEASURE RESULTS (n=36) Mean score 35% Mean search duration 2.5 minutes Mean # of sites viewed 0.6 sites Areas of weakness Not knowing what a scholarly source is or how to find one
  10. 10. SEARCH SOURCES (Prior to instruction) SEARCH SOURCE # OF STUDENTS % OF STUDENTS GOOGLE 19 53% LIBRARY WEB SCALE 7 19% GOOGLE SCHOLAR 3 8% LIBRARY DATABASE 2 5.5% LIBRARY RESEARCH GUIDE 2 5.5% MULTIPLE SEARCH SOURCES 2 5.5% CONSUMER HEALTH SITE 1 2.5%
  11. 11. TYPES OF SOURCES SELECTED (Prior to instruction) TYPE OF SOURCE # OF STUDENTS % OF STUDENTS CONSUMER SITE 16 44% REVIEW 7 19.5% POSITION PAPER 6 17% RESEARCH 4 11% ONLINE REFERENCE WORK 2 5.5% NONE 1 3%
  12. 12. SEARCHING TRENDS (Prior to instruction) • For about half, no distinction in search methods/sources for consumer/personal vs. scholarly searches • Use of filters/limits, Boolean & synonyms virtually non-existent • Search revisions did not necessarily lead to better outcomes
  13. 13. PRETEST/POSTTEST COMPARISON-SCHOLARLY MEASURE PRETEST POSTTEST Mean score 35% 72% ** Mean search duration 2 minutes, 30 seconds 2 minutes, 38 seconds Mean # of sites viewed 0.6 1.5 Areas of weakness Knowing what scholarly sources are and where to find them Relevancy & source distinction Use of filters **Pretest and posttest scores significantly different using a Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, (V=35, p<0.001)
  14. 14. TYPES OF SEARCH SOURCES (Before and after instruction) SOURCE % PRIOR TO INSTRUCTION % AFTER INSTRUCTION Google/internet search engine 53% 11% Google Scholar 8% 28% PubMed or PubMed Central 0% 20% Science Direct 0% 17% BioMed Central 0% 6% Library Web Scale 19% 3% Academic Search Premier 5.5% 0% Library Research Guide 5.5% 0% Consumer health website 2% 0% Multiple sources 5.5% 17%
  15. 15. SOURCES SELECTED (Before and after instruction) TYPE OF SOURCE % OF STUDENTS BEFORE INSTRUCTION % OF STUDENTS AFTER INSTRUCTION Research article 11% 67% Review article 19.5% 11% Consumer health site 44% 8% Position paper 17% 5.5% Letter to the editor 0% 3% Book chapter 0% 3% Online reference work 5.5% 0% None 3% 3%
  16. 16. SEARCHING TRENDS (After instruction) •Increase in the use of Boolean (from 8% to 53%) •Increase in the use of filters (from 11% to 30%) •Large number of multiple search sources & revisions suggests difficulties with recognizing topically relevant research articles
  17. 17. IMPLICATIONS FOR INSTRUCTION • Introduce fewer databases and emphasize filters/limits • More practice exercises on topical relevancy and source type
  18. 18. TAKE AWAYS • Students must be explicitly taught what scholarly sources are and how to find them • If there is not enough time for practice and checking for understanding instruction may lead to confusion, over-searching and reversion to Google • One shots: less is more
  19. 19. NEXT STEPS • Repeating the study with approximately 100 students this semester • Interested in finding others that want to replicate the study
  20. 20. WORK CITED Norman CD, Skinner HA. 2006. eHealth Literacy: Essential Skills for Consumer Health in a Networked World. Journal of Medical Internet Research:8(2):e9.
  21. 21. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thank you to: • Maricopa Center for Learning and Instruction which funded the fellowship • Robert H. Martin, SCC Nutrition faculty, for his collaboration on the project • SCC Library Division faculty for feedback on the presentation

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