Turning them loose: increasing student engagement in information literacy activities - Eileen Wright

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Turning them loose: increasing student engagement in information literacy activities - Eileen Wright

  1. 1. Eileen Wright Montana State University Billings Library Billings, Montana
  2. 2. Backgound on MSU Billings Information Literacy course New Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) framework for Information Literacy Hands on Activities  Many Ages of Information  Critical Thinking  Concept Maps
  3. 3. LSCI 125: Research in the Information Age Introduces students to the organization, retrieval, and evaluation of both electronic and print sources; covers concepts of the research process, methods, and ethics of information research, the evolving nature of information resources, and appropriate information citation. Formats In-person Online Hybrid Intersession Summer Half Semester
  4. 4. Years Online Students In-Person Students Total Students 2007- 2015 935 644 1579 I thought I knew everything about research, but I learned a lot from this class
  5. 5. “Information literacy is a set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning.”
  6. 6. is “organized into six frames, each consisting of a concept central to information literacy, a set of knowledge practices, and a set of dispositions.” “At the heart of this Framework are conceptual understandings that organize many other concepts and ideas about information, research, and scholarship into a coherent whole.”
  7. 7. Authority Is Constructed and Contextual Information resources reflect their creators’ expertise and credibility, and are evaluated based on the information need and the context in which the information will be used. Authority is constructed in that various communities may recognize different types of authority. It is contextual in that the information need may help to determine the level of authority required. Information Creation as a Process Information in any format is produced to convey a message and is shared via a selected delivery method. The iterative processes of researching, creating, revising, and disseminating information vary, and the resulting product reflects these differences. Information Has Value Information possesses several dimensions of value, including as a commodity, as a means of education, as a means to influence, and as a means of negotiating and understanding the world. Legal and socioeconomic interests influence information production and dissemination.
  8. 8. Research as Inquiry Research is iterative and depends upon asking increasingly complex or new questions whose answers in turn develop additional questions or lines of inquiry in any field. Scholarship as Conversation Communities of scholars, researchers, or professionals engage in sustained discourse with new insights and discoveries occurring over time as a result of varied perspectives and interpretations. Searching as Strategic Exploration Searching for information is often nonlinear and iterative, requiring the evaluation of a range of information sources and the mental flexibility to pursue alternate avenues as new understanding develops.
  9. 9. Knowledge Practices Dispositions Authority is Constructed and Contextual  Use research tools and indicators of authority to determine the credibility of sources, understanding the elements that might temper this credibility  Recognize that authoritative content may be packaged formally or informally and may include sources of all media types  Develop and maintain an open mind when encountering varied and sometimes conflicting perspectives  Develop awareness of the importance of assessing content with a skeptical stance and with a self-awareness of their own biases and worldview Information Creation as a Process  Recognize that information may be perceived differently based on the format in which it is packaged  Develop, in their own creation processes, an understanding that their choices impact the purposes for which the information product will be used and the message it conveys  Understand that different methods of information dissemination with different purposes are available for their use Information Has Value  Give credit to the original ideas of others through proper attribution and citation  Articulate the purpose and distinguishing characteristics of copyright, fair use, open access, and the public domain  Make informed choices regarding their online actions in full awareness of issues related to privacy and the commodification of personal information  Respect the original ideas of others  See themselves as contributors to the information marketplace rather than only consumers of it
  10. 10. Knowledge Practices Dispositions Research as Inquiry  Deal with complex research by breaking complex questions into simple ones, limiting the scope of investigations  Use various research methods, based on need, circumstance, and type of inquiry  Organize information in meaningful ways  Synthesize ideas gathered from multiple sources  Draw reasonable conclusions based on the analysis and interpretation of information  Maintain an open mind and a critical stance  Seek multiple perspectives during information gathering and assessment  Seek appropriate help when needed  Follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information Scholarship as Conversation  Cite the contributing work of others in their own information production  Contribute to scholarly conversation at an appropriate level, such as local online community, guided discussion, undergraduate research journal, conference presentation/poster session  Critically evaluate contributions made by others in participatory information environments  See themselves as contributors to scholarship rather than only consumers of it  Understand the responsibility that comes with entering the conversation through participatory channels  Value user-generated content and evaluate contributions made by others Searching as Strategic Exploration  Determine the initial scope of the task required to meet their information needs  Utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) and convergent (e.g., selecting the best source) thinking when searching  Match information needs and search strategies to search tools  Design and refine needs and search strategies, based on search results  Understand how information systems (i.e., collections of recorded information) are organized to access relevant information  Use different searching language types (e.g., controlled vocabulary, keywords, natural language)  Manage searching processes and results  Exhibit mental flexibility and creativity  Understand that first attempts at searching do not always produce adequate results  Realize that information sources vary greatly in content and format and have varying relevance and value, depending on the needs and nature of the search  Seek guidance from experts, such as librarians, researchers, and professionals  Persist in the face of search challenges, and know when enough information completes the information task
  11. 11. Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practices Recognize that information may be perceived differently based on the format in which it is packaged Information Creation as a Process: Dispositions Understand that different methods of information dissemination with different purposes are available for their use
  12. 12. What other types of information were they getting? How were they getting that information? How much information were they getting at one time? How quickly was the information getting to her/him? How important were the bits of information? Colonial time: only horses and ships Agricultural Age: horse and buggy – limited trains on East Coast and wire Industrial Age: trains, cars, limited phones, and no television 80’s: computers but no Internet access yet – no email – no cell phones Information Age: today Information needs are the same for each time period: water, food, shelter. However, how has it changed through the ages?
  13. 13. Scholarship as Conversation: Disposition See themselves as contributors to scholarship rather than only consumers of it Searching as Strategic Exploration: Dispositions Exhibit mental flexibility and creativity Realize that information sources vary greatly in content and format and have varying relevance and value, depending on the needs and nature of the search
  14. 14. Title of Show Define the subject of area of investigation: What is the crime? Formulate the search strategy: What do they decide to do? Search for the criminal, investigate the wife, look online? When searching, do you notice any search terms/key words that are repeated? Find the information from varying sources: Where do they find their answers? What type of resources do they use? Analyze/Evaluate the data collected: Was the information they found valid, was the witness credible? Was the evidence reliable? Organize the information: Did you see them organize the information in any special way: poster board, use a computer, paper notes, charts? Communicate the information: How was the evidence presented? A written report, a news report, online media, to their boss, to their colleagues? Respond to the following questions in a word document:
  15. 15. Authority is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practices Develop and maintain an open mind when encountering varied and sometimes conflicting perspectives Develop awareness of the importance of assessing content with a skeptical stance and with a self- awareness of their own biases and worldview Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practices Synthesize ideas gathered from multiple sources Draw reasonable conclusions based on the analysis and interpretation of information Research as Inquiry: Dispositions Maintain an open mind and a critical stance Seek multiple perspectives during information gathering and assessment
  16. 16.  Someone says she reached her sister in Memphis an hour ago and they are all heading south  Cell phones are not working now  The water outside is frozen solid and you see lots of people traveling on the ice, leaving the city  Friend’s dad says stay inside –anyone going outside will instantly freeze when the next wave comes through  Police officer says it is nonsense to stay – need to get going before the snow gets any deeper Keep these things in mind that you just saw from the movie clips: Would you accept the information from your friend’s dad or from the police officer? Would you stay or would you go?
  17. 17. Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practices Determine the initial scope of the task required to meet their information needs Utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) and convergent (e.g., selecting the best source) thinking when searching Use different searching language types (e.g., controlled vocabulary, keywords, natural language) Searching as Strategic Exploration: Dispositions Exhibit mental flexibility and creativity Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practices Deal with complex research by breaking complex questions into simple ones, limiting the scope of investigations
  18. 18. Broad topic Laura Ingels Wilder Restricted topic Homestead Act Main Research Question How did the Homestead Act shape the West?
  19. 19. What is the Homestead Act? What opposition was there to the Homestead Act? Who was affected by the Homestead Act? What opportunities did the Homestead Act provide? You need to ask the who, what, where, when, why, and how.
  20. 20. Your search term Synonym Homestead Dwelling, home, farm Opposition Competition, contention, resistance Change Development, shift, transformation Study Investigation, survey, course
  21. 21. LSCI 125 Research in the Information Age Incorporation of the new ACRL Framework into LSCI 125 class  Group activities Thank you!!!
  22. 22. Association of College & Research Libraries. (2015). Information literacy competency standards for higher education. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency Hofer, A. R., Brunetti, K., & Townsend, L. (2013). A threshold concepts approach to the standards revision. Communications in Information Literacy, 7(2), 108 – 113. Gibson, C., & Jacobson, T.E. (2014, May). Informing and extending the draft ACRL information literacy framework for higher education: An overview and avenues for research. College & Research Libraries, 73(5), 250-254. doi:10.5860/0750250 Solomon, A., Wilson, G., & Taylor, T. (2012). 100% Information Literacy Success. Boston: Wadsworth. Upson, M., Hall, C. M., & Cannon, K. (2015). Information now: A graphic guide to student research. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

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