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Supporting information literacy and
study skills with Open Educational
Resources (OER)
Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Who has used OERs?
Open Education & OER
• MIT Open Courseware Initiative (OCI) (2002)
• Open Educational Resources UK
• JISC/HEA projects:
“W...
Advantages?
Advantages
•
•
•
•
•

Sharing and reuse
Reinventing the wheel
E-learning expensive / costs
Learn from others
24/7 online
Creative Commons
http://creativecommons.org/
•
•
•
•

Nonprofit
Increase sharing & collaboration
4 types of licence (6 com...
Attribution allows
•
•
•
•
•

Distribution
Modify, remix, derivative works
Commercial use
Must give credit for the origina...
Attribution Share Alike
• Distribution
• Modify, remix, derivative works
• Commercial use
• Must give credit for the origi...
Attribution No Derivatives
• Distribution
• Commercial use
• Must give credit for the original creation
• No derivative wo...
Attribution Non-Commercial
• Distribution
• Modify, remix, derivative works
• No commercial use
• Must give credit for the...
Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
• Distribution
• Modify, remix, derivative works
• No commercial use
• Must give cr...
Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives
• Distribution
• No modification, remix, derivative works
• No commercial use
• ...
CC - BY

Creative Commons
Attribution

CC – BY - ND

Creative Commons
Attribution
No Derivatives

CC – BY - SA

Creative C...
Public Domain
• Works no longer restricted by copyright
• e.g. old collections of
o paintings, books, photographs
o Tag fo...
• Choose and agree a search term
Live search or screen grab
http://www.jorum.ac.uk
Skills Portal
• Undergraduates
• Taught Masters
• Doctoral Students
Jorum

• Download
• Stylesheet
• Create index
• Convert from Word to HTML
© University of Leicester
©University of Central Lancashire
© Open University
Evaluation?
• Criteria?
• Issues?
– Technical
– Pedagogy
– Practical
• Miriam's repurposed resource
Plagiarism
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this session you should be able to:


Recall what is meant by plagiarism



Consider dif...
What is Plagiarism?


“Plagiarism is the presentation of another person’s
work intentionally or unintentionally as if it ...
Why and how I Re-purposed
It is a good Turning point exercise to add interest
to Information Literacy (referencing) sessio...
Plagiarism?

Presentation created by University of Birmingham and adapted for University of Surrey students.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this session you should be
able to:
•Recall what is meant by plagiarism
•Consider differen...
What is Plagiarism?
The University of Surrey ‘Regulations for Academic Integrity’ defines
plagiarism as:
•inserting words,...
1) It is the day before your assignment is due to be submitted.
You contact an online essay writing service, which later t...
2) You have been asked to submit an essay on Romeo and Juliet
and your cousin emails you her old A* essay on that topic, y...
3) In your essay you discuss your own thoughts on
bankers’ bonuses. Do you need to give a reference?

1. Yes
2. No
3. Unsu...
4) You are writing an assignment about the British constitution
and you state that the Queen is the head of state of the U...
5) You include in an essay a table of data or a picture
that you have found on the Web.
Do you need to reference it?

1. Y...
6) You paraphrase in your essay Richard Dawkins’ ideas on the
transmission of cultural values from one of his popular book...
7) You and a friend are taking the same module and therefore
have the same essay to write. The essay is not to be done as
...
8) You find a paragraph in a book that supports an argument
that you are making in your assignment. You copy this
paragrap...
Presentation:
Created by University of Birmingham as part of the DELILA project

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/12...
Repositories
Repositor

Connexion

y

Jorum

s

Learning

Merlot

Resource

OER
Commons

Exchange for
url

http://cnx.org
...
Advantages
• Time
• Quality
• Customize
- Replace institution branding
- Adjust assessments
- Add local instructions
What would you find useful for your teaching?
Where/How might you use it?

http://libweb.surrey.ac.uk/library/skills/learn...
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
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Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron

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Presented at From the road less travelled to the information super highway: information literacy in the 21st Century.

Friday, January 31st, 2014 at The British Library Conference Centre

Published in: Education, Technology
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Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) - Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron

  1. 1. Supporting information literacy and study skills with Open Educational Resources (OER) Vivien Sieber & Miriam Tarron
  2. 2. Who has used OERs?
  3. 3. Open Education & OER • MIT Open Courseware Initiative (OCI) (2002) • Open Educational Resources UK • JISC/HEA projects: “What do we need to do to share and reuse courseware?” 2009-10 • Open University • Jorum (Repository) • Dependent on CC licences
  4. 4. Advantages?
  5. 5. Advantages • • • • • Sharing and reuse Reinventing the wheel E-learning expensive / costs Learn from others 24/7 online
  6. 6. Creative Commons http://creativecommons.org/ • • • • Nonprofit Increase sharing & collaboration 4 types of licence (6 combinations) Author retains copyright
  7. 7. Attribution allows • • • • • Distribution Modify, remix, derivative works Commercial use Must give credit for the original creation Most accommodating of licenses
  8. 8. Attribution Share Alike • Distribution • Modify, remix, derivative works • Commercial use • Must give credit for the original creation • Must use the same license as original on derivative works (commercial allowed)
  9. 9. Attribution No Derivatives • Distribution • Commercial use • Must give credit for the original creation • No derivative works, must be passed intact
  10. 10. Attribution Non-Commercial • Distribution • Modify, remix, derivative works • No commercial use • Must give credit for the original creation • Must use the same license as original on derivative works
  11. 11. Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike • Distribution • Modify, remix, derivative works • No commercial use • Must give credit for the original creation • Must use the same license as original on derivative works i.e. Non-commercial
  12. 12. Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives • Distribution • No modification, remix, derivative works • No commercial use • Must give credit for the original creation • Must use the same license as original on derivative works i.e. Non-commercial
  13. 13. CC - BY Creative Commons Attribution CC – BY - ND Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives CC – BY - SA Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike CC – BY - NC Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial CC – BY – NC - SA Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial Share Alike CC – BY – NC - ND Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial Share Alike No Derivatives
  14. 14. Public Domain • Works no longer restricted by copyright • e.g. old collections of o paintings, books, photographs o Tag for discoverability o Caution a work may be out of copyright in one jurisdiction but still protected in another jurisdiction
  15. 15. • Choose and agree a search term
  16. 16. Live search or screen grab http://www.jorum.ac.uk
  17. 17. Skills Portal • Undergraduates • Taught Masters • Doctoral Students
  18. 18. Jorum • Download • Stylesheet • Create index • Convert from Word to HTML
  19. 19. © University of Leicester
  20. 20. ©University of Central Lancashire
  21. 21. © Open University
  22. 22. Evaluation? • Criteria? • Issues? – Technical – Pedagogy – Practical
  23. 23. • Miriam's repurposed resource
  24. 24. Plagiarism
  25. 25. Learning Outcomes At the end of this session you should be able to:  Recall what is meant by plagiarism  Consider different scenarios and judge in each case whether or not they would be classed as plagiarism  Consider different scenarios and judge in each case whether or not a reference would be required
  26. 26. What is Plagiarism?  “Plagiarism is the presentation of another person’s work intentionally or unintentionally as if it were your own” University of Birmingham’s WebCT course on plagiarism.  “The action or practice of taking someone else's work, idea, etc., and passing it off as one's own; literary theft.” Oxford English Dictionary.
  27. 27. Why and how I Re-purposed It is a good Turning point exercise to add interest to Information Literacy (referencing) sessions  Change references to University of Surrey regulations to make sense  Add a bit of fun…  Acknowledge  Share alike? 
  28. 28. Plagiarism? Presentation created by University of Birmingham and adapted for University of Surrey students.
  29. 29. Learning Outcomes At the end of this session you should be able to: •Recall what is meant by plagiarism •Consider different scenarios and judge in each case whether or not they would be classed as plagiarism •Consider different scenarios and judge in each case whether or not a reference would be required
  30. 30. What is Plagiarism? The University of Surrey ‘Regulations for Academic Integrity’ defines plagiarism as: •inserting words, concepts, or images from the work of someone else into work submitted for assessment without acknowledging the originator's contribution and •representing the work of another as one's own, whether purchased or not, or taken with or without permission. •“The action or practice of taking someone else's work, idea, etc., and passing it off as one's own; literary theft.” Oxford English Dictionary.
  31. 31. 1) It is the day before your assignment is due to be submitted. You contact an online essay writing service, which later that day (for a fee) emails you an essay that meets your requirements. The next day you submit this essay. Is this plagiarism? 1. Yes 2. No 3. Unsure 0% Un su re 0% No Ye s 0% 10
  32. 32. 2) You have been asked to submit an essay on Romeo and Juliet and your cousin emails you her old A* essay on that topic, you make a few alterations and add a few new ideas. You submit this essay. Is this plagiarism? 1. Yes 2. No 3. Unsure 0% Un su re 0% No Ye s 0% 10
  33. 33. 3) In your essay you discuss your own thoughts on bankers’ bonuses. Do you need to give a reference? 1. Yes 2. No 3. Unsure 0% Un su re 0% No Ye s 0% 10
  34. 34. 4) You are writing an assignment about the British constitution and you state that the Queen is the head of state of the UK. Do you need to provide a reference for this? 1. Yes 2. No 3. Unsure 0% Un su re 0% No Ye s 0% 10
  35. 35. 5) You include in an essay a table of data or a picture that you have found on the Web. Do you need to reference it? 1. Yes 2. No 3. Unsure 0% Un su re 0% No Ye s 0% 10
  36. 36. 6) You paraphrase in your essay Richard Dawkins’ ideas on the transmission of cultural values from one of his popular books. Because you are not directly quoting you don’t put quotation marks. Do you need to add a reference? 1. Yes 2. No 3. Unsure 0% Un su re 0% No Ye s 0% 10
  37. 37. 7) You and a friend are taking the same module and therefore have the same essay to write. The essay is not to be done as group work. You and your friend write your essays in the library together and end up with very similar essays. Is this plagiarism? 1. Yes 2. No 3. Unsure 0% Un su re 0% No Ye s 0% 10
  38. 38. 8) You find a paragraph in a book that supports an argument that you are making in your assignment. You copy this paragraph into your assignment, putting quotations marks at the start and finish and provide a citation. Is this plagiarism? 1. Yes 2. No 3. Unsure 0% Un su re 0% No Ye s 0% 10
  39. 39. Presentation: Created by University of Birmingham as part of the DELILA project http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/15964 This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License, and adapted under this license for University of Surrey students by Miriam Tarron. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/. Title Slide photograph: Original photograph: White Sheep by Bjarki Sigursveinsson http://www.flickr.com/photos/40275507@N07/3863494118 This photograph is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 3.0 Unported License and was adapted under this license, for this presentation, by Len Tarron.
  40. 40. Repositories Repositor Connexion y Jorum s Learning Merlot Resource OER Commons Exchange for url http://cnx.org http://www.jorum.ac. uk Target Primary - Tertiary Further & Higher education Peer Review  Community Federated searching Host country Funding  US Hewitt Foundation. Not for profit schools http://lreforschools.eun.org/ web/guest/home http://www.merlot.org/merlot/index.htm http://www.oercomm ons.org/ Schools, FE Primary - Tertiary    blog  portal    wiki UK Mimas HEfCE/JISC European Schoolnet European Union (EU) US Institutional corporate partnership US Institute for the Study o (ISKME) Primary - Tertiary Hewitt Foundation Institutional and outreach partners Construction tools Rhaptos Licensing CC Open Author CC mixed CC/copyright CC
  41. 41. Advantages • Time • Quality • Customize - Replace institution branding - Adjust assessments - Add local instructions
  42. 42. What would you find useful for your teaching? Where/How might you use it? http://libweb.surrey.ac.uk/library/skills/learningskills.html End

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