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Reviewing the role of
teaching librarians in
supporting student’s
digital capabilities
Manfred Gschwandtner
Learning & Res...
Job description:
Learning and Research Librarian (Learning and Teaching)
Main Duties:
... Lead on the design and deliver a...
Aim
The aim of my Masters Dissertation was
to understand how a Health Faculty
supports students and staff in
developing th...
Objectives
The objectives where to
1. identify the stakeholders involved in the provision of digital capabilities in
the F...
Objectives
The objectives where to
1. identify the stakeholders involved in the provision of digital capabilities in
the F...
Changing the Context
Walton, G. (2016) “Digital Literacy” (DL): Establishing the
Boundaries and Identifying the Partners, ...
Outline
• JISC’s “6 Elements of Digital Capabilities”
(JISC, 2016) as a framework for this review.
• Methods
• Results
• D...
Digital Literacy Framework
JISC Digital Capabilities Framework
“6 Elements of digital capabilities”
(JISC, 2016)
“Digital capabilities are the
capabi...
JISC Digital Capabilities Framework
Element 2:
Information, Media and Data Literacies
(JISC, 2016)
JISC Digital Capabilities Framework
Element 6:
Digital Identity and wellbeing
(JISC, 2016)
Methods
Methods
• Literature Review
• 14 interviews with DL stakeholders (qualitative method)
• All stakeholders were related to o...
Results
Literature Review
Literature Review
• When librarians talk about digital literacy they talk about
• “digital information literacy”
(=finding...
Literature Review
• Nevertheless, there are examples of librarians going
beyond this practice by teaching data literacy (D...
Literature Review
• Librarians can develop and teach a critical and reflective approach
to social media and to a culture o...
Literature Review
Other Examples:
• “Digital 2.0” project
“Disadvantaged groups and vulnerable social groups of people wit...
Results
Qualitative Case Study
Stakeholders interviewed
• Interviews with 14 stakeholders
• The stakeholders involved were :
academics, students, librari...
Interview Questions
• Interview question 5 (Q5):
What is your opinion on the role of librarians related to
digital literac...
Q5 – Role of Librarians:
• Overall, there was a strong emphasis from most participants that librarians teach
information l...
Q5 – Role of Librarians:
Ideas of areas librarians could engage that emerged during
the interviews were:
• Being more invo...
Summary
• Librarians are seen as mainly involved in teaching digital information
literacy
• They support IT skills necessa...
Discussion
Is this ok or shall
we change
something?
Should librarians
support more
elements of the
Framework?
Should librarians support more
elements of the framework?
1. It depends on our individual skills,
interests and on our lev...
Professional Development
A SCONUL study (Mackenzie, A. et al, 2016) asked senior library managers how they
would “assess t...
Professional Development
“How important is it for staff to develop an expertise in this areas?”
This study shows that ther...
Benefits
• Digital literacy is seen as an essential strategic aim in most HE
institutions (L&T strategies, graduate attrib...
Benefits
• Boosts our collaboration with faculties and other professional
services (teaching, curriculum development)
• It...
Benefits
• Raises the profile and visibility of librarians in Faculties
• Enables librarians to try “new things” out of
th...
Conclusion
Conclusion
• In the context of JISC’s digital capabilities framework librarians
are mainly seen as supporting digital info...
Conclusion
• Professional Development to upskill librarians in different
elements of the digital capabilities framework is...
Thank you!
References
Bernsmann, S., & Croll, J. (2013). Lowering the threshold to libraries with social media: The approach of
“Digi...
References
Pun, R. (2015). Conceptualizing the integration of digital humanities in instructional
services: Possibilities ...
Personal Experience
• Workshops on digital literacy (not “digital information literacy”)
e.g. “Visitors & Residents” and s...
Disadvantages
• Waters down our identity as “information professionals”
• We would advocate the “wrong” aim by supporting ...
Which elements of the Framework
can librarians support?
More research necessary to better understand
what librarians alrea...
Q4: Support of digital capabilities
If you think about your role, which aspects of Digital Literacy
do you address?
(JISC’...
Results
In order to visualize the support for different capabilities by
different stakeholders I created two tables which ...
Results
Levels of support:
Dark blue = Strong support: reported support is a key responsibility of the role
Light blue = S...
Results
Student facing and staff facing support.
• Student facing means that a stakeholder directly works with students wi...
Table 1: Student facing support
Table 2: Staff facing support
Results
• Student facing support is more fragmented and less robust especially in element 3, 4
and 6
• Staff facing suppor...
Conclusion
• The literature review and the qualitative analysis shows that in
the context of the JISC “6 elements of Digit...
Results
• Academics bear most of the responsibility to teach students the different elements digital
capabilities outlined...
Recommendations
1. Upskilling academics and encouraging them to embrace digital technolgy
2. Improving direct support for ...
Qualitative Case Study - Summary
1. Digital Literacy is supported by different stakeholder
2. Since direct support for stu...
What have we done so far..
Reviewing the role of academic librarians in supporting student’s
digital capabilities
• Litera...
Discussion
• Using a Digital Literacy framework to review the role of librarians in
supporting digital capabilities is ess...
Aim
… to understand how librarians can support students
in developing their digital capabilities
Other findings
• Stakeholder’s conception of digital literacy is predominantly associated with
more traditional concepts o...
Background
• New job description
• “The library has to establish what it currently delivers in the way of information
lite...
Other findings
• Collaboration: “there is definitely more room for improvement
around collaboration.”.. and collaborations...
How can librarians
support students in
developing their digital
capabilities?
Background
• Compared to information literacy, a lot of stakeholders are involved in Digital literacy
• The librarians I a...
Multidisciplinary Teams
• An opportunity for professional services to boost collaboration
• Faculty based
• An opportunity...
Peer mentoring - Digital Champions
• Upskilling students to directly support their peers
• Programme and cohort/group leve...
Strategic aim
Our main aim is to support students in developing their
digital capabilities to learn, live and work success...
Strategic objectives
In order to achieve this aim I think we need to focus strategically on
• Upskill academics and get th...
IL vs. DL
… one of the major differences between IL
and DL is that much more stakeholders
consider themselves involved in ...
Stakeholders Conception
of Digital Literacy (?)
When asked to think about their conception of digital literacy participant...
Collaboration
More collaboration was one of the most mentioned wishes for
the future. Everybody should head “in the same d...
Aim of the Masters Dissertation
The overall aim of this dissertation was to understand
how a Faculty in HE institution in ...
Stakeholders
2 Academics
2 Students
2 Librarians
1 Academic learning and skills developer
1 IT services manager
1 Career d...
Stakeholders Conception
of Digital Literacy
Student support
Academics
Staff support (Academics)
Learning
technologists
Academic
Developer
IT
L&TManager
Student support
Academics
Staff support (Academics)
Learning
technologists
Academic
Developer
IT
L&TManager
Multi-Discipl....
Literature Review
1. Your assessment of the digital capabilities of staff whose core roles are student support and academi...
Professional Development
A SCONUL study (2012) asked senior library managers how they would assess their
staff regarding t...
Academic Librarians
• Liaison Librarians
• Subject Librarians
• Learning Support Librarians
• Information Advisers
• Learn...
Digital Literacy ≈ Digital Capabilities
Digital Literacy & Librarians
Librarian teaching
digital literacy
Digitally Literate Librarian
Literature Review
• The term “digital literacy” was coined by Paul Gilster (1997)
• For Gilster “digital literacy” is “the...
Literature Review
• Littlejohn, Beetham and Mcgill (2012) analyzed the provision of digital
literacy in UK higher educatio...
Should librarians support more
elements of the framework?
Librarians
1 ICT Proficiency
2
Information Literacy
Data Literac...
Reviewing the role of teaching librarians in supporting student's digital capabilities - Gschwandtner & McKinney
Reviewing the role of teaching librarians in supporting student's digital capabilities - Gschwandtner & McKinney
Reviewing the role of teaching librarians in supporting student's digital capabilities - Gschwandtner & McKinney
Reviewing the role of teaching librarians in supporting student's digital capabilities - Gschwandtner & McKinney
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Reviewing the role of teaching librarians in supporting student's digital capabilities - Gschwandtner & McKinney

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Reviewing the role of teaching librarians in supporting student's digital capabilities - Gschwandtner & McKinney

  1. 1. Reviewing the role of teaching librarians in supporting student’s digital capabilities Manfred Gschwandtner Learning & Research Librarian – Canterbury Christ Church University Pam McKinney Information School, University of Sheffield
  2. 2. Job description: Learning and Research Librarian (Learning and Teaching) Main Duties: ... Lead on the design and deliver an embedded and contextualised programme of Information and Digital Literacy to a diverse range of learners, utilising a blend of face-to-face and online channels…..
  3. 3. Aim The aim of my Masters Dissertation was to understand how a Health Faculty supports students and staff in developing their digital capabilities.
  4. 4. Objectives The objectives where to 1. identify the stakeholders involved in the provision of digital capabilities in the Faculty 2. conduct a series of interviews with these stakeholders to investigate a) their general conception of digital literacy b) which digital capabilities they support and how c) the role of librarian’s in supporting students to develop their digital capabilities 3. make recommendations on how to improve the support of digital capabilities in the Faculty
  5. 5. Objectives The objectives where to 1. identify the stakeholders involved in the provision of digital capabilities in the Faculty 2. conduct a series of interviews with these stakeholders to investigate a) their general conception of digital literacy b) which digital capabilities they support and how c) the role of librarian’s in supporting students to develop their digital capabilities 3. make recommendations on how to improve the support of digital capabilities in the Faculty
  6. 6. Changing the Context Walton, G. (2016) “Digital Literacy” (DL): Establishing the Boundaries and Identifying the Partners, New Review of Academic Librarianship, 22:1, 1-4 • In this editorial Walton is thinking about academic librarians as being part of a DL curriculum or working in the context of a DL framework • “The library has to establish what it currently delivers in the way of information literacy that can form part of the DL curriculum. At the same time, the library should establish what it potentially could develop as part of DL, over and above its current practice.” (p. 3)
  7. 7. Outline • JISC’s “6 Elements of Digital Capabilities” (JISC, 2016) as a framework for this review. • Methods • Results • Discussion • Conclusion
  8. 8. Digital Literacy Framework
  9. 9. JISC Digital Capabilities Framework “6 Elements of digital capabilities” (JISC, 2016) “Digital capabilities are the capabilities which fit someone for living, learning and working in a digital society.“ https://www.jisc.ac.uk/rd/projects/building-digital-capability
  10. 10. JISC Digital Capabilities Framework Element 2: Information, Media and Data Literacies (JISC, 2016)
  11. 11. JISC Digital Capabilities Framework Element 6: Digital Identity and wellbeing (JISC, 2016)
  12. 12. Methods
  13. 13. Methods • Literature Review • 14 interviews with DL stakeholders (qualitative method) • All stakeholders were related to one faculty (case study) • The semi structures interviews included 8 Questions • “Thematic analysis” was used to identify themes and patterns in the data
  14. 14. Results Literature Review
  15. 15. Literature Review • When librarians talk about digital literacy they talk about • “digital information literacy” (=finding, evaluating and organizing digital information) • teaching it online • teaching the digital skills (IT skills) necessary for teaching information literacy (e.g. saving files or using appropriate software to organize information) (Cordell, 2013 ; Kenton & Blummer, 2010 ; …)
  16. 16. Literature Review • Nevertheless, there are examples of librarians going beyond this practice by teaching data literacy (Digital Humanities, digital scholarship) or social media topics including digital participation or digital identity.
  17. 17. Literature Review • Librarians can develop and teach a critical and reflective approach to social media and to a culture of online participation and sharing (Rheingold, 2012), (Scheaffer & Little, 2014). • The “Digital Tattoo” Project https://digitaltattoo.ubc.ca/
  18. 18. Literature Review Other Examples: • “Digital 2.0” project “Disadvantaged groups and vulnerable social groups of people with special needs “ (Bernsmann & Croll, 2013, p. 53) took part in IT and social media training mostly run by librarians • “What’s On the Menu?”, Digital Humanities project, NY Public Library Building and maintaining a database/website including the world’s largest collection of restaurant menus. Teaching interventions lead by librarians. Using the website and extracting, annotating, contextualizing and visualize data (Pun, 2015)
  19. 19. Results Qualitative Case Study
  20. 20. Stakeholders interviewed • Interviews with 14 stakeholders • The stakeholders involved were : academics, students, librarians, academic learning and skills developers, IT, careers, learning technologists, academic developers….
  21. 21. Interview Questions • Interview question 5 (Q5): What is your opinion on the role of librarians related to digital literacy?
  22. 22. Q5 – Role of Librarians: • Overall, there was a strong emphasis from most participants that librarians teach information literacy. Librarians are the ones who “oversee the finding of information, the organization of information, the sifting out of irrelevant information”. They “support students when they look seeking information, or trying to verify information, or trying to find that evidence”. • Primarily, they are not seen as a service that teaches students in other elements of the digital literacy framework such as creation, communication, collaboration, participation or digital identity.
  23. 23. Q5 – Role of Librarians: Ideas of areas librarians could engage that emerged during the interviews were: • Being more involved in data management • Better engagement with students using social media • Upskilling librarians to take part in IT support • Supporting digital citizenship • Supporting collaboration (between students on placement)
  24. 24. Summary • Librarians are seen as mainly involved in teaching digital information literacy • They support IT skills necessary to find, evaluate and organise information • Librarians are mostly seen as experts in information literacy and not in other elements of the framework • There are some examples in the literature of librarians going “over and above” this current practice
  25. 25. Discussion
  26. 26. Is this ok or shall we change something? Should librarians support more elements of the Framework?
  27. 27. Should librarians support more elements of the framework? 1. It depends on our individual skills, interests and on our level of confidence (Professional Development). 2. It depends on possible benefits.
  28. 28. Professional Development A SCONUL study (Mackenzie, A. et al, 2016) asked senior library managers how they would “assess the digital capabilities of staff whose core roles are student support and academic liaison.” (JISC’s Seven Elements of Digital Literacies)
  29. 29. Professional Development “How important is it for staff to develop an expertise in this areas?” This study shows that there is not enough expertise in other areas than IL and a need for professional development.
  30. 30. Benefits • Digital literacy is seen as an essential strategic aim in most HE institutions (L&T strategies, graduate attributes) • Digital Literacy is essentially linked to other important strategic aims such as employability or inclusion. • Because of this, digital literacy is a pragmatic “way in” for librarians to collaborate with the Faculties in curriculum design or teaching.
  31. 31. Benefits • Boosts our collaboration with faculties and other professional services (teaching, curriculum development) • It repositions the librarian as part of a wider service/team/group • Within these teams librarians can negotiate with the other team members which elements of the framework they want to cover. • Improves the student-facing support which mainly depends on academics in the Faculty that I analysed.
  32. 32. Benefits • Raises the profile and visibility of librarians in Faculties • Enables librarians to try “new things” out of the comfort zone .
  33. 33. Conclusion
  34. 34. Conclusion • In the context of JISC’s digital capabilities framework librarians are mainly seen as supporting digital information literacy, occasionally supporting other elements. • Our core responsibility is to enhance student’s information literacy.. • ...but it would be beneficial to support other elements of the JISC Digital Capabilities Framework and to focus our support on the digitally literate student, not only on the information literate student.
  35. 35. Conclusion • Professional Development to upskill librarians in different elements of the digital capabilities framework is essential. • More research is needed to better understand what librarians already do in this context, what motivates them to do this and how successful this support is.
  36. 36. Thank you!
  37. 37. References Bernsmann, S., & Croll, J. (2013). Lowering the threshold to libraries with social media: The approach of “Digital Literacy 2.0”, a project funded in the EU Lifelong Learning Programme. Library Review, 62(1), 53–58. http://doi.org/10.1108/00242531311328168 Cordell, R. M. (2013). Information Literacy and Digital Literacy: Competing or Complementary? Communications in Information Literacy, 7(2), 177–183 JISC. (2016). Building digital capabilities: The six elements defined. Retrieved July 11, 2017, from http://repository.jisc.ac.uk/6611/1/JFL0066F_DIGIGAP_MOD_IND_FRAME.PDF Kenton, J., & Blummer, B. (2010). Promoting digital literacy skills: examples from the literature and implications for academic librarians. Community & Junior College Libraries, 16(2), 84–99. http://doi.org/10.1080/02763911003688737 Mackenzie, A., & Martin, L. (Eds.). (2016). Developing digital scholarship: emerging practices in academic libraries. Facet Publishing.
  38. 38. References Pun, R. (2015). Conceptualizing the integration of digital humanities in instructional services: Possibilities to enhance digital literacy in the 21st century. Library Hi Tech, 33(1), 134–142. Rheingold, H. (2012). Stewards of digital literacies. Knowledge Quest, 41(1), 52–55. SCONUL (2012) Summary report on baseline survey of digital literacy. Available at: http://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/66781051/SCONUL Baseline summary.pdf (Accessed: 23 March 2018). Scheaffer, K., & Little, G. (2014). Champions of Digital Literacy: Fostering a World of Informed Digital Producers. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 40(3–4), 408–409. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2014.06.004
  39. 39. Personal Experience • Workshops on digital literacy (not “digital information literacy”) e.g. “Visitors & Residents” and social media workshops • Together with a Learning technologist we started a university wide Digital Capabilities Working Group • Project on developing a peer mentoring programme for digital capabilities • Research project with the Faculty
  40. 40. Disadvantages • Waters down our identity as “information professionals” • We would advocate the “wrong” aim by supporting students to become digitally literate and not information literate. • By fully supporting digital literacy we are sidelining information literacy • (digital) information literacy and digital literacy are very similar concepts looking at the same thing with a different focus • For example: DL concepts such as collaboration or participation can also be seen as part of information literacy
  41. 41. Which elements of the Framework can librarians support? More research necessary to better understand what librarians already do in this context and how they could improve their support of digital capabilities.
  42. 42. Q4: Support of digital capabilities If you think about your role, which aspects of Digital Literacy do you address? (JISC’s 6 elements digital literacy are shown to the participants and they comment on each of the different elements)
  43. 43. Results In order to visualize the support for different capabilities by different stakeholders I created two tables which included • the 14 digital capabilities of the JISC Framework, • the stakeholders and which differentiated between • 3 different levels of support • Student and staff facing support
  44. 44. Results Levels of support: Dark blue = Strong support: reported support is a key responsibility of the role Light blue = Support: reported support is not at key responsibility of the role, happens incidentally, occasionally or cursory White = No support
  45. 45. Results Student facing and staff facing support. • Student facing means that a stakeholder directly works with students with regard to digital capabilities • Staff facing means that a stakeholder works with members of staff (usually academics) to upskill them in digital literacy so they can better teach it directly to the students.
  46. 46. Table 1: Student facing support
  47. 47. Table 2: Staff facing support
  48. 48. Results • Student facing support is more fragmented and less robust especially in element 3, 4 and 6 • Staff facing support is more robust especially in element 3, 4 and 6 • The frequency of strong support (dark blue) is higher for staff facing than for student facing 36 (student) : 58 (staff) • Student facing support relies mainly on academic staff especially in element 3, 4 and 6 with some help in 1, 2 and 5 from student facing services such as Academic Learning Development, Careers, IT or the Library.
  49. 49. Conclusion • The literature review and the qualitative analysis shows that in the context of the JISC “6 elements of Digital Capabilities” librarians mainly support digital information literacy • Changing this practice and engaging with other elements of this framework has the potential to be highly beneficial for librarians. • Better aligns their work with overall University policies and frameworks • Fosters collaboration • It can raise the profile of the librarians in the Faculty and the University
  50. 50. Results • Academics bear most of the responsibility to teach students the different elements digital capabilities outlined in the JISC framework. • The quality of supporting digital capabilities relies to a great degree on the academic’s knowledge and enthusiasm regarding digital technologies • If a tutor is not enthusiastic about the use of blogs, wikis or social media in her or his teaching than it is very unlikely that students acquire these practices (Littlejohn et al., 2012). • No equality across groups
  51. 51. Recommendations 1. Upskilling academics and encouraging them to embrace digital technolgy 2. Improving direct support for students by a) building multidisciplinary teams for each Faculty that includes mainly student facing stakeholders such as academic learning development, library, careers, IT and the Faculty learning technologist. This team is a “pool of experts” that is not “upskilling” staff but proactively supports academics in teaching various digital capabilities by directly working with students. a) Improving peer mentoring by training „digital champions“ in each year group and programme
  52. 52. Qualitative Case Study - Summary 1. Digital Literacy is supported by different stakeholder 2. Since direct support for student is very fragmented it makes sense that these different stakeholder start working together (e.g. in a multidisciplinary team) in order to support students collaboratively 3. The librarian could be part of this team and has the opportunity to engage in various aspects of digital literacy not just in digital information literacy. 4. In general, the stakeholder did not think that there is a lot of collaboration between them at the moment.
  53. 53. What have we done so far.. Reviewing the role of academic librarians in supporting student’s digital capabilities • Literature review • Qualitative Case study looking at • the perception of librarians with regard to digital capabilities by different stakeholder • Overall support for DC in the Faculty and the possible role of the librarian in a multidisciponary team
  54. 54. Discussion • Using a Digital Literacy framework to review the role of librarians in supporting digital capabilities is essential because it demonstrates the scope of digital capabilities from “ICT proficiency” to “Digital Wellbeing” • The literature review and the qualitative study show that the role of librarians in supporting digital literacy is predominantly seen as teaching “digital information literacy”. • There are some examples in the literature of librarians going beyond this current practice and some suggestions by the stakeholders what else librarians could do.
  55. 55. Aim … to understand how librarians can support students in developing their digital capabilities
  56. 56. Other findings • Stakeholder’s conception of digital literacy is predominantly associated with more traditional concepts of digital literacy such as basic IT skills or finding and critiquing digital information. Social media and the related capabilities such as communication, participation or digital identity were less prevalent. • Digital capabilities are seen as a means to an end and are usually taught by being embedded into a course and by supporting its learning outcomes. • The “invisibility” of digital literacy
  57. 57. Background • New job description • “The library has to establish what it currently delivers in the way of information literacy that can form part of the DL curriculum. At the same time, the library should establish what it potentially could develop as part of DL, over and above its current practice.” (Walton, 2016) • Masters Dissertation on this topic for an MA in Library and Information Services Management (distance learning) at the University of Sheffield (Information School)
  58. 58. Other findings • Collaboration: “there is definitely more room for improvement around collaboration.”.. and collaborations are “not labelled as such and it’s not formalized and it’s not structured”. • There is an opportunity for librarians to support elements of digital capabilities that go beyond information literacy. • Hardly any research on digital literacy is carried out.
  59. 59. How can librarians support students in developing their digital capabilities?
  60. 60. Background • Compared to information literacy, a lot of stakeholders are involved in Digital literacy • The librarians I am interested in are academic librarians and within the academic librarians the “teaching librarians”
  61. 61. Multidisciplinary Teams • An opportunity for professional services to boost collaboration • Faculty based • An opportunity to review job descriptions and to improve direct student support (LRS restructure, Learning Technologists) • Support and train peer mentors • The teams could be part of the new Digital Capabilities Working Group
  62. 62. Peer mentoring - Digital Champions • Upskilling students to directly support their peers • Programme and cohort/group level • Discussion with Peer Mentoring Service started (e.g. Peer Assisted Learner Leaders (PALs) could become “digital champions”) • Incentives for students
  63. 63. Strategic aim Our main aim is to support students in developing their digital capabilities to learn, live and work successfully in a digital society.
  64. 64. Strategic objectives In order to achieve this aim I think we need to focus strategically on • Upskill academics and get them enthusiastic about DC in L&T • Improving collaboration of the professional services • Developing effective peer mentoring • Develop both a generic University wide support and tailored programme/module level support
  65. 65. IL vs. DL … one of the major differences between IL and DL is that much more stakeholders consider themselves involved in providing DL support than in providing IL support.
  66. 66. Stakeholders Conception of Digital Literacy (?) When asked to think about their conception of digital literacy participants mentioned specific elements of digital literacy (such familiarity with social media, digital communication…) Amongst these elements the information literacy element of digital literacy - finding, evaluating and managing digital information – was mentioned often. The two librarians, the academic learning and skills developer, the two learning technologists, career, the academics and one student mentioned them when they thought about their conception of digital literacy. On the other hand, the elements of digital literacy which are more related to social media such as communication, collaboration, participation or digital identity came up less frequent.
  67. 67. Collaboration More collaboration was one of the most mentioned wishes for the future. Everybody should head “in the same direction and knowing that we are all providing the right support at the right time”, we all “need to be singing from the same song book” and should be “unified in our approach, because it’s the way the world is. It's the way the world's expanding and we need to make sure that our students are equipped with the right skills and resources”
  68. 68. Aim of the Masters Dissertation The overall aim of this dissertation was to understand how a Faculty in HE institution in the UK supports students and staff in developing their digital capabilities.
  69. 69. Stakeholders 2 Academics 2 Students 2 Librarians 1 Academic learning and skills developer 1 IT services manager 1 Career development adviser 2 Learning technologists 1 Student engagement officer 1 Senior Academic Developer 1 Learning and Teaching Manager from the Faculty (1 Student Disability Service Manager)
  70. 70. Stakeholders Conception of Digital Literacy
  71. 71. Student support Academics Staff support (Academics) Learning technologists Academic Developer IT L&TManager
  72. 72. Student support Academics Staff support (Academics) Learning technologists Academic Developer IT L&TManager Multi-Discipl.Team Digitalchampions
  73. 73. Literature Review 1. Your assessment of the digital capabilities of staff whose core roles are student support and academic liaison. Staff expertise Importance of staff developing expertise in this area Comments to help qualify responses Expert Competent Novice N/A a. ICT/Computer Literacy b. Information Literacy c. Media literacy d. Communication & Collaboration e. Digital scholarship f. Learning skills 2. Please add any digital literacies which are not represented in the list developed by the JISC (Optional)
  74. 74. Professional Development A SCONUL study (2012) asked senior library managers how they would assess their staff regarding the support of digital capabilities (JISC’s Seven Elements of Digital Literacies) Results: • In most of the digital capabilities listed staff was assessed by their managers as either competent or novice and not as experts (expect for information literacy) • There is a “general agreement on the importance of developing expertise in each area”
  75. 75. Academic Librarians • Liaison Librarians • Subject Librarians • Learning Support Librarians • Information Advisers • Learning & Research librarians …Librarians working in Higher Education and who are involved in teaching/supporting information literacy
  76. 76. Digital Literacy ≈ Digital Capabilities
  77. 77. Digital Literacy & Librarians Librarian teaching digital literacy Digitally Literate Librarian
  78. 78. Literature Review • The term “digital literacy” was coined by Paul Gilster (1997) • For Gilster “digital literacy” is “the ability to understand and use information in multiple formats from a wide range of resources when it is presented via computers.” (p. 33) • For him, the core competence to understand and use information is critical thinking. • For librarians, Gilster’s definition of digital literacy is important because it is strongly connected to information literacy.
  79. 79. Literature Review • Littlejohn, Beetham and Mcgill (2012) analyzed the provision of digital literacy in UK higher education institutions. • They found that academic skills departments, libraries and IT services are amongst the main stakeholders involved in digital literacy. • Historically, the role of librarians in digital literacy is closely related to development of the role of subject librarians • Embracing new technology (databases, internet), subject librarians turned into digital information specialists (Pinfield, 2001) and therefore, supported the digital literacy agenda.
  80. 80. Should librarians support more elements of the framework? Librarians 1 ICT Proficiency 2 Information Literacy Data Literacy Media Literacy 3 Digital Creation Digital Problem solving (Research) Digital Innovation 4 Digital Communication Digital Collaboration Digital Participation 5 Digital Learning Digital Teaching 6 Digital Identity Digital Wellbeing Librarian2* 1 ICT 2 Information Literacy Data Literacy Media Literacy 3 Digital Creation Digit. Problem solving (Research) Digital Innovation 4 Digital Communication Digital Collaboration Digital Participation 5 Digital Learning Digital Teaching 6 Digital Identity Digital Wellbeing * Answers of Librarian 2 in the study on which Digital Capabilities he currently supports ? Dark blue = strong support, key responsibility Light blue = occasional support White = No support

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