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Play as transformative information literacy education - Walsh

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Presented at LILAC 2018

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Play as transformative information literacy education - Walsh

  1. 1. Play as transformative Information Literacy education Andrew Walsh Teaching Fellow, University of Huddersfield Trainer / Publisher, Innovative Libraries OŰ Training Officer, CILIP Information Literacy Group @playbrarian http://innovativelibraries.org.uk/ LILAC, 2018 https://teachkit.org.uk/ This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
  2. 2. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License 1) Everyone please tell the person next to them your favourite game 2) Everyone stand up! Stay standing if you use play or games in your work 3) A secret challenge…
  3. 3. IL is socially constructed… … so it helps to have pedagogical approach that enables socially constructed meaning to emerge. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
  4. 4. (Koh, 2014; De Koven, 2014) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
  5. 5. We need permission to play (Goffman, 1974; Glenn & Knapp, 1987) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
  6. 6. play is Apparently Purposeless (done for its own sake); Voluntary; has Inherent Attraction; Freedom from time; Diminished consciousness of self; Improvisational potential; and Continuation desire. Brown & Vaughan (2010) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (Also: Huizinga, 1955)
  7. 7. play is Apparently Purposeless (done for its own sake); Voluntary; has Inherent Attraction; Freedom from time; Diminished consciousness of self; Improvisational potential; and Continuation desire. Brown & Vaughan (2010) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (Also: Huizinga, 1955)
  8. 8. People can play alone, but play is inherently social and tends towards social interactions. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
  9. 9. • IL is socially constructed • Playful learning suits socially constructed learning… … if we can give permission to play This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
  10. 10. Thanks for listening… More stuff: • Twitter: @playbrarian • Email: andywalsh@innovativelibraries.org.uk • Or: a.p.walsh@hud.ac.uk • Slides at: https://www.slideshare.net/andy_walsh/play-as-transformative-information-literacy-education • http://innovativelibraries.org.uk • Some games & materials to buy: http://teachkit.org.uk This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
  11. 11. References, etc. Note that all images my own, except where otherwise stated. • Berger, P. L. and T. Luckmann (1966). The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge. Garden City, NY: Anchor Books. • Brown, S. L., & Vaughan, C. C. (2010). Play: how it shapes the brain, opens the imagination, and invigorates the soul. New York: Avery • Chang, C., Hsu, C., & Chen, I. (2013). The relationship between the playfulness climate in the classroom and student creativity. Quality & Quantity, 47(3), 1493-1510 • De Koven, B (2014). A playful path. Halifax, Canada: ETC Press. • Elmborg, J. (2006). Critical Information Literacy: Implications for Instructional Practice. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 32 (2), pp. 192-199. • Francis, P. (2009). Inspiring writing in art and design: taking a line for a write. Bristol, UK: Intellect. • Glenn, P. Knapp, M. (1987). The interactive framing of play in adult conversations. Communication Quarterly, 35 (1), pp. 48-66. • Gauntlett, D. (2011). Making is connecting: the social meaning of creativity, from DIY and knitting to YouTube and Web 2.0. Cambridge: Polity. • Goffman,E. (1974). Frame analysis: An essay on the organization of experience. New York: Harper & Row. • Huizinga, J. (1955). Homo Ludens: A study of the play element in culture. Boston: Beacon Press. • Koh, A (2014). The political power of play. Hybrid Pedagogy: . Retreived from: http://www.digitalpedagogylab.com/hybridped/political-power-of-play/ • Lloyd, A. (2005). Information literacy: Different contexts, different concepts, different truths? Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. 37 (2), pp. 82-88. • Walsh, Andrew (2015). Playful Information Literacy: Play and information Literacy in Higher Education. Nordic Journal of Information Literacy in Higher Education, 7 (1). pp. 80-94. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

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