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Not required reading - Brookbank

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Not required reading - Brookbank

  1. 1. Not required reading: Leisure reading as an information literacy, student well-being, and social justice issue for academic libraries
  2. 2. SUBTITLE: ARIAL BOLD/REGULAR Body copy in Arial, use normal sentence case. Bullet list • Bullet one • Bullet two • Bullet three
  3. 3. Connection to information literacy? • Leisure reading  academic achievement – “Free voluntary reading” (Krashen) – Reading for pleasure during university vacations = higher GPA (Gallik)
  4. 4. Social constructivism • Life experiences and the whole person • Authentic learning • Lifelong learning
  5. 5. Connection to information literacy? • Leisure reading  academic achievement • Leisure reading  empathy – Theory of Mind – literary fiction (Mar) – Interpersonal sensitivity – romance and suspense/thriller genres (Fong, Mullin, & Mar)
  6. 6. Connection to information literacy? • Leisure reading  academic achievement • Leisure reading  empathy • Leisure reading  creativity – 4 out of 5 measures on SCAB (Scale of Creative Attributes & Behaviors) correlate w/reading for pleasure (Kelly & Kneipp) – Creativity: re-frame negative information, decrease worry, decrease neuroticism (Wycoff & Pryor; Kelly; Gelade)
  7. 7. SUBTITLE: ARIAL BOLD/REGULAR Body copy in Arial, use normal sentence case. Bullet list • Bullet one • Bullet two • Bullet three
  8. 8. Connection to information literacy? • Leisure reading  academic achievement • Leisure reading  empathy • Leisure reading  creativity • Leisure reading  mental well-being • Leisure reading  social justice – Lower levels of literacy = less pleasure reading = compounding and cumulative disadvantages (Dewan)
  9. 9. SUBTITLE: ARIAL BOLD/REGULAR Body copy in Arial, use normal sentence case. Bullet list • Bullet one • Bullet two • Bullet three
  10. 10. References • Critten, Jessica and Andrea G. Stanfield. “Social constructivism and critical information literacy.” Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, edited by Nicole Pagowsky and Kelly McElroy, Association of College and Research Libraries, a division of the American Library Association, 2016. • Dewan, Pauline. “Economic well-being and social justice through pleasure reading.” New Library World, vol. 117, no. 9/10, 2016. • Eskin, Mehmet, et al. “Suicidal behavior and psychological distress in university students: A 12‐nation study.” Archives of Suicide Research, vol. 20, no. 3, 2016, doi.org/10.1080/13811118.2015.1054055. • Fong, K., Mullin, J.B., & Mar, R.A. (2013). What you read matters: the role of fiction genre in predicting interpersonal sensitivity. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 7(4), 370–376. • Gallik, Jude. “Do they read for pleasure? Recreational Reading Habits of College Students.” Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, vol. 42, no. 6, 1999. • Gelade, G. A. (2002). Creative style, personality, and artistic endeavor. Genetic, Social, and General Psychology Monographs, 128, 213-234. • Hurst, Susan, et al. “Cats, Comics, and Knausgård: Promoting Student Reading at a U.K. Academic Library with a Leisure Reading Collection.” New Review of Academic Librarianship, vol. 23, no. 4, 2017, doi:10.1080/13614533.2017.1371612. • Kelly, K. E. (2005). The relationship between worry and creative personality. Counseling and Clinical Psychology Journal, 2, 75-80. • Kelly, Kathryn E. and Lee B. Kneipp. "Reading for Pleasure and Creativity among College Students." College Student Journal, vol. 43, no. 4, Dec2009 Part A, pp. 1137-1144. • Krashen, Stephen D. Power of Reading: Insights From the Research, 2nd ed, Libraries Unlimited, 2004. • Mar, Raymond A., et al. “Exploring the Link Between Reading Fiction and Empathy: Ruling Out Individual Differences and Examining Outcomes.” Communications: The European Journal of Communication Research, vol. 34, no. 4, 2009. • Stallman, Helen. “Psychological distress in university students: A comparison with general population data.” Australian Psychologist, vol. 45, no. 4, 2010, doi.org/10.1080/00050067.2010.482109. • Ward-Griffin, Emma, et al. “Petting away pre‐exam stress: The effect of therapy dog sessions on student well‐being.” Stress and Health, vol. 34, no. 3, 2018, doi.org/10.1002/smi.2804. • Wycoff, E. B., & Pryor, B. (2003). Cognitive processing, creativity, apprehension, and the humorous personality. North American Journal of Psychology, 5, 31-44.
  11. 11. Elizabeth Brookbank Associate Professor / Instruction Librarian Western Oregon University Email: brookbanke@wou.edu Twitter: @elizabethbrookb

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