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Maker Literacy: Connecting IL within the maker movement - Jessie Long & Jennifer Hicks

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Maker Literacy: Connecting IL
within the maker movement
Jessie Long and Jennifer Hicks
Miami University Regionals

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Oh the Literacy
Information Literacy - A set of abilities requiring individuals to recognize when information
is needed an...

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Literature Review
From “Making a Place for Makerspaces in Information Literacy” (Mann)
“It is no longer enough to only foc...

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Maker Literacy: Connecting IL within the maker movement - Jessie Long & Jennifer Hicks

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Presented at LILAC 2022

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Maker Literacy: Connecting IL within the maker movement - Jessie Long & Jennifer Hicks

  1. 1. Maker Literacy: Connecting IL within the maker movement Jessie Long and Jennifer Hicks Miami University Regionals
  2. 2. Oh the Literacy Information Literacy - A set of abilities requiring individuals to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information (ALA) Maker Literacy - A set of “practices for making and remaking artifacts and texts through playful tinkering with materials and technologies” (Wohlwend et al.) Technology Literacy - The ability to appropriately select and responsibly use technology (Colorado Department of Education) “Any” Literacy - competence or knowledge in a specified area Other literacies - tool literacy, computer literacy, digital literacy
  3. 3. Literature Review From “Making a Place for Makerspaces in Information Literacy” (Mann) “It is no longer enough to only focus on the information-retrieval side of information literacy. Instead, librarians should broaden the definition to include the power of the maker movement to help library users locate, evaluate, and effectively use resources and materials to explore the world around them.” “When students have opportunities to read these kinds of texts in the context of making, they reinforce all literacy skills simultaneously.” “Traditional literacy and makerspaces not only can both hold a place in our libraries, they can do so simultaneously.”
  4. 4. Literature Review “At each stage of making activities, students can develop information literacy skills by determining the need for information about their projects, getting the information they need, evaluating the information available, using it to accomplish the task, taking ownership of those skills, and sharing their work with others. Of course, each activity will emphasize different skills, but all will call upon some of the information literacy skills.” “Students Are Makers! Building Information Literacy Skills Through Makerspace Programs” (Lofton).
  5. 5. First Steps - Connecting with Faculty Faculty Working Group - 2 separate sessions 3-5 faculty meet with library staff throughout the semester to create a class assignment that can be implemented in the makerspace. Faculty received funds-$200 (half after creating project/half when implemented in class) as an incentive Projects included: ● Creative Writing - Synesthesia - create a physical object that represents your story ● Criminal Justice - Forensics - create a 3d layout of crime scene ● Commerce - Prototype - create a product
  6. 6. Creative Writing - Sculpting Synesthesia Synesthesia - the combining or confusing of our five senses in unexpected ways. For example, describing sunlight as fuzzy, the color green as chilly, the letter B as shiny, or wallpaper as noisy. Initial assignment: An in-class writing exercise, where students complete a fill-in-the-blank “survey” about the fiction and poetry they have written. Example survey questions include “If your story was an animal, it would be a ___,” or “If your poem was a food, it would be ___.” Students then write about why— why is the story they’re writing a giraffe or a snail or an eagle? Why is the poem a banana? TEC Lab connection: Students create the physical object related to their story with the 3D printer, 3D pen, or laser cutter. The object becomes a crucial element of the writing process, because it’s an immediate, tangible representation that can be reshaped, recast, and revised in ways as the student continues working through the vagaries of the creative process. Completed? Yes.
  7. 7. Criminal Justice - Forensics Initial Assignment: Design your own nightclub Students work as a group to design the physical layout of a nightclub with the goal of reducing crowding. They would create a 2D floor plan with cutouts and chalk. TEC Lab connection: Following assignment would use 3D pens and 3D printer to build a 3D model of the nightclub as part of their crime scene development. Completed? Not completed. The instructor stopped communicating with us, and the final project assignment was never set up.
  8. 8. Commerce - Prototype Initial assignment: Design Thinking Makerspace Team Project Students apply the design thinking process to generate solutions for a customer problem. They engage in team activities that encourage working together in problem-solving, creative thinking, and innovation processes. Final project includes a prototype or design as well as a final report that documents the team’s processes and activities completed during the project time period. TEC Lab connection: Use makerspace resources including 3D pens, 3D printer, vinyl cutter, and laser cutter to engage in product prototyping/development and testing Completed? Yes.
  9. 9. Continued Outreach - Information Literacy Menu https://tinyurl.com/26nd9cb8
  10. 10. Additional Spaces - One Button Studio The One Button Studio is available for anyone to check-out. Uses have included: ● Steam Studio video production ● Commercial recording ● Podcasting ● Video interviews ● Green screen workshops
  11. 11. Classes/Projects Library staff can be requested to give overviews of the makerspace to classes. This usually includes a presentation and sampling of some makerspace materials/tools. Botany - Cutting Boards ● Laser Cutter ● Wood burning pens Education - Tech Literacy ● 3D Pens ● Oculus Quest ● iPad apps - Merge Cube Commerce - Explaining creativity ● Button maker ● Vinyl cutter
  12. 12. Classes/Projects ACE - Showing creativity ● 3D pens ● Stained glass Geology - Fossils and water quality ● Laser Cutter ● 3D printer Art - Designing images ● 3D printer ● Laser Cutter
  13. 13. Departmental Connections Campus Admissions - team bonding Classified Personnel Advisory Committee - fundraising ELC - International Week presentations
  14. 14. Event Path - Programming VolunTEC Lab - Make 2 Take 1 Traveling TEC Lab Wreaths for nursing home Cat houses for animal shelter Community events
  15. 15. Event Path - Programming Maker Faire Terrariums Sublimation
  16. 16. Connecting with the Community - STEM/STEAM Two K-12 programs STEAM Studio- Hosted by the university. Runs during summer with multiple week-long sessions. Open to 5-8th grade area students. Discover STEM Days- 8th grade local students attend a 1 day STEM camp. Both programs have created a partnership with the library/makerspace to offer hands-on activities tied to science, technology, engineering, art, and math. Some of our projects have included: ● 3D pen bridge building ● cardboard circuits ● digital design with sublimation printing
  17. 17. Outside our Library - Additional Projects Three examples from Makerspaces for Adults ● Chapter 23 - Laser-Cut Snowflake Workshop: Introducing design and fabrication to makerspace beginners (Sheaffer) ● Chapter 25 - A Tale of Two Tortoises: How the Cline Library MakerLab is building curriculum, community, and cohesive service design (Schmand, See, and Rowan Wipf) ● Chapter 29 - Taking a Virtual Archaeological Site Tour A Class Visit to the Baths of Caracalla (Fleming, Reber, and Crowe)
  18. 18. Laser Cut Snowflakes University connection with students, faculty, and staff Designed as a collaboration between the university makerspace and a library-based digital media design center. Purpose: Introduces makerspace beginners to design software and fabrication using a laser cutter. Also set up as part of their outreach to meet and integrate new members of the community. Process: ● Design a snowflake using suggested software. ● Use laser cutter to cut out snowflakes. ● Add string or ribbon to hang up ornaments. Maker Literacy/Information Literacy: Learning how to properly design and create vector files, learning and understanding how to setup and ‘print’ a file on a laser cutter.
  19. 19. Tortoise Shell Community Connection The library was the largest 3D printing environment in Northern Arizona that also serves the regional community. Purpose: A local veterinarian reached out to them to help repair a damaged shell on a tortoise. Process: ● Scan shell and mold broken pieces. ● Use 3D modelling software to make new shell pieces. ● Return pieces to the veterinarian for sterilization and fitting. Maker Literacy/Information Literacy: Troubleshooting how to best scan, mold, print, and fit repairs on living reptiles. Making numerous prototypes to adjust to needed changes.
  20. 20. Virtual Archaeological Site Tour University connection for a particular course using the library’s Digital Makerspace. Purpose: Enable students to visit an archaeological site in Rome without leaving campus. For this assignment, it was the Baths of Caracalla, where they analyzed Roman history by investigating the site’s features. Process: ● Locate a site in Google Earth containing sufficient detailed images. ● Have students work in pairs with one on the VR headset and one watching a monitor to provide direction and movement. ● Discuss what they learned from their field trip along with the value of VR for exploring archaeological sites. Maker Literacy/Information Literacy: A virtual field trip “allows students to gain an experiential understanding of what archaeological sites can tell us about the past, and how to reconstruct political and economic structures via careful interpretation of architecture and artifacts.”
  21. 21. Learning from Failure Failure Happens ● Failed projects ○ Equipment failure ○ Under/overestimating knowledge of makers ○ Time constraints ● Failed outreach ○ Few or no attendees ○ Lack of faculty participation Troubleshooting ● Be brave! ○ Learn more about equipment than you ever intended ○ Take things apart (within reason and warranty) ● Be creative! ○ Create online tutorials and detailed instructions. ○ Have them on hand or playing on a loop during events ● Try again or not!
  22. 22. Tutorials and Instructions https://libguides.lib.miamioh.edu/middletown_tec_lab https://youtu.be/bMAec1E8WyI
  23. 23. Oh the (Lack of) Assessment One study from Wallace, Trkay, Peery, and Chivers found: ● Student achievement in maker competencies including teamwork, time management, communication, design thinking, problem solving, and knowledge sharing. ● Anecdotal and largely subjective More needs to be done to get a better understanding of assessment, particularly within university libraries. Why? Benefits of assessment: ● Justification of makerspaces and programs ● Fulfilling a requirement for grants or other funding reporting ● Meeting goals of an assignment or program Connections within the community, course assignments, and departments provide opportunities for various assessment methods: ● Surveys of participants ● Student reflections on projects ● Photographs of events Making During a Pandemic: tinyurl.com/MIRA2021Presentation
  24. 24. Growth of the Movement Makerspaces: a practical guide for librarians 2nd edition (Burke and Kroski) contains results from an informal 2017 survey that asked librarians about their makerspace setup and use. From 273 respondents: ● 60 percent (164 respondents) have a makerspace ● 20 percent (55 respondents) were planning to start one in the near future ● 20 percent (54 respondents) do not have one, nor are they planning to start one When people ask why you have a makerspace, what do you tell them? ● “It is an opportunity for students to take risks and learn from failure in a consequence- free environment.” ● “Makerspaces provide a place for collaboration, critical thinking, troubleshooting, determination, education, and innovation. We spark interest in hobbyists and help hone skills to close our local jobs gap.”
  25. 25. References and Further Reading American Library Association (ALA). 2019. “Information Literacy.” Welcome to ALA's Literacy Clearinghouse, https://literacy.ala.org/information-literacy/. Bowler, Leanne, and Ryan Champagne. 2016. “Mindful Makers: Question Prompts to Help Guide Young Peoples’ Critical Technical Practices in Maker Spaces in Libraries, Museums, and Community-Based Youth Organizations.” Library and Information Science Research 38 (2): 117–124. doi:10.1016/j.lisr.2016.04.006. Burke, John, and Ellyssa Kroski. 2018. Makerspaces : A Practical Guide for Librarians. Second edition. Practical Guides for Librarians: No. 38. Lantham: Rowman & Littlefield. Hicks, Jennifer and Jessica Long, eds. 2020. Makerspaces for Adults: Best Practices and Great Projects. Lantham: Rowman & Littlefield. Lofton, Jane. 2017. “Students Are Makers! Building Information Literacy Skills Through Makerspace Programs.” CSLA Journal 40 (2): 18–20. Mann, Leah. 2018. “Making a Place for Makerspaces in Information Literacy.” Reference & User Services Quarterly 58 (2): 82–86. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26588782
  26. 26. References and Further Reading Meyer, Anika, and Ina Fourie. 2015. “What to Make of Makerspaces Tools and DIY Only or Is There an Interconnected Information Resources Space?” LIBRARY HI TECH 33 (4): 519–525. doi:10.1108/LHT-09-2015-0092 Stornaiuolo, Amy, et al. 2018. “Building Spaces for Literacy in School: Mapping the Emergence of a Literacy Makerspace.” English Teaching: Practice & Critique (Emerald Group Publishing Limited) 17 (4): 357–370. doi:10.1108/ETPC-03- 2018-0033. Wallace, Martin K., Gretchen Trkay, Katie Musick Peery, and Morgan Chivers. 2017. "Making Maker Literacies: Integrating academic library makerspaces into the undergraduate curriculum." In Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Academic Makerspaces. Wardrip, Peter Samuelson, Samuel Abramovich, Rebecca Millerjohn, and Jordan M. Smith. 2019. “Assessing Learning and Engagement in Library Makerspaces: It’s Harder Than You Think.” Young Adult Library Services 17 (4): 32–35. Wohlwend, Karen E., Jill A. Scott, Joanne H. Yi, Amanda Deliman, and Tolga Kargin. 2018. "Hacking toys and remixing media: Integrating maker literacies into early childhood teacher education." In Digital childhoods: Technologies in children's everyday lives, edited by Susan Danby, Marilyn Fleer, Christina Davidson, & Maria Hatzigianni, 147-162. Sydney: Springer.
  27. 27. Jessie Long Outreach & Instruction Librarian Miami University Regionals Email: longjh@miamioh.edu Telephone: 0015137273225 Twitter: @gnome_free Jennifer Hicks Circulation & Reserves Supervisor/Makerspace Program Coordinator Miami University Regionals Email: hicksjl2@miamioh.edu Telephone: 0015137273221 Twitter: @jenniohio

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