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Looking for information literacy in the English National Curriculum and exam syllabi - Sarah Pavey

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Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA
Education Consultant
www.sp4il.co.uk
Email: sarahjpavey@gmail.com
Twitter: @Sarahinthelib
Looki...

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©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk
Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session we will understand…
 The limits ...

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©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk
https://www.ft.com/content/124a7e3e-93e6-11e3-a0e1-00144feab7de
Conclusion!

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Looking for information literacy in the English National Curriculum and exam syllabi - Sarah Pavey

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Presented at LILAC 2022

Presented at LILAC 2022

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Looking for information literacy in the English National Curriculum and exam syllabi - Sarah Pavey

  1. 1. Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA Education Consultant www.sp4il.co.uk Email: sarahjpavey@gmail.com Twitter: @Sarahinthelib Looking for information literacy in the English National Curriculum and exam syllabi
  2. 2. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Learning Outcomes By the end of this session we will understand…  The limits of information literacy in the National Curriculum of England  The impact on transition to higher education
  3. 3. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk https://www.ft.com/content/124a7e3e-93e6-11e3-a0e1-00144feab7de Conclusion!
  4. 4. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk “Deliberate practice refers to a special type of practice that is purposeful and systematic. While regular practice might include mindless repetitions, deliberate practice requires focused attention and is conducted with the specific goal of improving performance.” Ericsson, A. and Pool, R. (2016) Peak: secrets from the new science of expertise. USA: Houghton, Miffin, Harcourt.
  5. 5. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk When & Why did it Disappear?  2008 ATL Survey on coursework  2010 Controlled assessment  2014 New Curriculum – exam based  Notes to Curriculum (non-statutory) Libraries mentioned only in English subject area De-professionalisation
  6. 6. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Deliberate Practice  Behavoural Theory - expert feedback in combination with accurate performance establishes and maintains the new improved performance.  Cognitive Theory - excellent performance results from practising complex tasks that produce errors. Such errors provide the learner with rich feedback that results in scaffolding for future performance.
  7. 7. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk When it looks like an opportunity… “Assessment will consist of a series of questions related to a contemporary geographical issue(s), leading to a more extended piece of writing which will involve an evaluative judgement. Students will apply knowledge and understanding to interpret, analyse and evaluate the information and issue(s) in the pre-release resources booklet and the question paper. They will also use geographical skills to set the issue(s) in context and to examine conflicting viewpoints about the issue(s) Students will develop a critical perspective on the issue(s) studied, consider the points of view of the stakeholders involved, make an appraisal of the advantages and disadvantages, and evaluate the alternatives. The exam will also require students to consider physical and human interrelationships and to make reasoned justifications for proposed solutions in terms of their likely impact on both people and the physical environment.” GCSE Geography
  8. 8. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Information Literacy Models Schultz-Jones, Barbara and Oberg, Dianne. (2022) Global Action for School Libraries: Models of Inquiry, De Gruyter Saur.
  9. 9. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Opportunities  Citizenship – NC and GCSE  HPQ and EPQ  Computing & Media Studies  Librarian initiatives
  10. 10. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Situational Motivation  Global  Community  Personal Situational motivation refers to the motivation individuals experience when they are currently engaging in an activity. It refers to the here-and-now of motivation Guay, Frederic, Vallerand, Robert J., and Blanchard, Celine. (2000) On the Assessment of Situational Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: The Situational MotivationScale (SIMS). Available at: https://selfdeterminationtheory.org/SDT/documents/2000_Guay VallerandBlanchard_MO.pdf
  11. 11. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Global
  12. 12. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Community “Teaching should develop pupils’ understanding of democracy, government and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Pupils should use and apply their knowledge and understanding whilst developing skills to research and interrogate evidence, debate and evaluate viewpoints, present reasoned arguments and take informed action”. https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/s ystem/uploads/attachment_data/file/908347/SECONDARY_nat ional_curriculum_-_Citizenship.pdf
  13. 13. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Community Ofsted In the grade descriptors for personal development (good and outstanding grades): ‘Secondary schools prepare pupils for future success in education, employment or training”. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school- inspection-handbook-eif/schools-inspection-handbook-for- september-2021#grade-descriptors-for-personal-development
  14. 14. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Personal https://www.rba.gov.au/speeches/ 2020/sp-so-2020-03-16.html
  15. 15. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Personal
  16. 16. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Learning Outcomes By the end of this session we will understand…  The limits of information literacy in the National Curriculum of England  The impact on transition to higher education
  17. 17. ©Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA www.sp4il.co.uk Questions
  18. 18. Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP FRSA Education Consultant www.sp4il.co.uk Email: sarahjpavey@gmail.com Twitter: @Sarahinthelib

Editor's Notes

  • At the end of this session you will have a better understanding of the National Curriculum of England and why it is so hard for students to practice the skills they will need in terms of information literacy for higher education and the workplace
  • The short answer is that there really isn’t very much at primary or secondary level. Sad but true. I analysed the primary and secondary NC in England and also read through the exam syllabi for GCSE and A Level for 3 main exam boards AQA, Edexcel and OCR. I then compared this to the IBDP and Scottish Advanced Highers. This paper will look at why there is so little incorporated and what we might do about it. There is a real impact on HE and workplace at transition.
  • Ericsson & Pool suggest that to become expert in something you need to apply deliberate practice techniques. Although some things are defined genetically eg how tall you are, most can be nurtured through focussed practice. If we apply this to information literacy then the NC in England provides little opportunity for this
  • The NC in England has changed in last 12 years and this has had an effect on recruitment of school librarians. Why do so few attend LILAC – it’s not just expense. Coursework was replaced as a knee jerk response to plagiarism rather than addressing the issue the government simply removed the opportunity reverting to a behaviourist rote learning agenda. Libraries unfortunately were mentioned in the NC but only under English and so that became the new role – reading for pleasure and cross curricular research was off the agenda. Many school librarians have no qualifications and many have not been to university themselves.
  • Here we can see that deliberate practice can work with an exam based behavioural approach to learning or one that is enquiry led but we need to have the opportunity and there lies the issue. Even younger teachers now shy away from independent learning because they are not encouraged to take this approach in their training and have not experienced it much themselves at school level.
  • This sample from the GCSE geography syllabus sets out the problem. It looks like a good opportunity to show off and assess analytical skills but although the students can work on the booklet it comprises of preset exercises with predetermined information and facilitated by the teacher. They then are not allowed to take their work into the exam room but work through the questions on a clean copy. Rote learning. In history a similar exercise for A level suggests the teacher should provide papers for the independent learning project for students to analyse as it is unlikely a school would have access to research articles!
  • Here we have a conundrum because we are dealing with a rote learning curriculum but so many models are based on inquiry learning. We need to identify the elements of the model we can use but take care not to contravene the learning style the teacher is trying to promote to get students to pass exams. I have written a chapter on this in the new IFLA /IASL Book due out later this year
  • The NC in England has changed in last 12 years and this has had an effect on recruitment of school librarians. Why do so few attend LILAC – it’s not just expense. Coursework was replaced as a knee jerk response to plagiarism rather than addressing the issue the government simply removed the opportunity reverting to a behaviourist rote learning agenda. Libraries unfortunately were mentioned in the NC but only under English and so that became the new role – reading for pleasure and cross curricular research was off the agenda. Many school librarians have no qualifications and many have not been to university themselves.
  • We need to be aware that we need to create opportunities that seem relevant otherwise teachers and students will not engage. We can tie this in at various levels so that IL elements are built into a lesson plan even if we are remote from the delivery we can show teachers the benefits of taking this approach
  • We can make the IL seem relevant by addressing wider global goals within the learning. Come to my workshop on Wednesday morning to see how you could do this in practice
  • Schools also have to follow the Citizenship curriculum. This is not quite so directive about DMIL as the GCSE in this subject but nonetheless does make mention of the need to hone research skills. In the NC there is comparatively little opportunity for research and much of the mark scheme is geared towards end product rather than process. Where the Citizenship curriculum emphasises evaluation and research it is important that this use of terminology is not applied as in some other subjects where Research means Find Something and where Evaluate means Do YOU think you could have done this work better which again both relate to end product not process. Can we ask teachers to award marks within their subject areas more broadly for process as you would if you showed workings out in the margin for maths?
  • For the school displaying a modern attitude to DMIL competencies on the website can be attractive to parents as they become worried by media reports. We are not just talking anti cyberbullying stance here because a recent report from Ofcom showed that parents were considerably more worried about students not being able to protect themselves from data harvesting than they were about cyberbullying! Ofsted also requires that schools should make it explicit on their website about how they prepare students for the future in terms of careers leadership which had an overhaul in 2018.
  • Taking employment further we can see the kinds of jobs that students are more likely to get in the future and again where the market swings towards a growth in non-routine cognitive skills that are not so easily replaced by AI it is these DMIL skills that will be to the fore. Ofsted are keen to see evidence in preparing students for the workplace and the CBI every year moan about the mismatch between the Curriculum and real life skills exhibited by school leavers
  • For those headed for Higher Education this survey again shows the types of competencies expected of first year undergraduates and since COVID the emphasis on digital skills has probably become even greater
  • Were the objectives met?
  • Any questions?

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