How can reading lists beeffective informationliteracy tools?         Victoria Farmer, Robert Gordon University         Col...
LIVE PRESENTATION ON YOUTUBE!                    You’ve seen the slides,                     now watch the video!         ...
Content of symposium• Presentation  – Propose the concept that reading lists can    develop and enhance information litera...
Reading lists and skills development• Reading lists have a variety of purposes.• The most well known and widely acknowledg...
CILIP information literacy definition and skills  Information literacy is knowing when and why youneed information, where ...
CILIP information literacy definition and skills  Information literacy is knowing when and why youneed information, where ...
CILIP information literacy definition and skills  Information literacy is knowing when and why youneed information, where ...
Where is the connection?
Where is the connection?                              All    A need for information    The resources available    How to f...
Where is the connection?                                         All       A need for information       The resources avai...
Where is the connection?                                            All        A need for information        The resources...
How is this done?IMPLICIT      EXPLICIT
How is this done?IMPLICITEXPLICIT
How is this done?            • list helps develop information literacyIMPLICIT      skills even though it is not designed ...
How is this done?            • list helps develop information literacyIMPLICIT      skills even though it is not designed ...
How is this done?            • list helps develop information literacyIMPLICIT      skills even though it is not designed ...
How is this done?            • list helps develop information literacyIMPLICIT      skills even though it is not designed ...
Different types and levels of lists        Many different types &      levels of lists with different      features - ALL ...
Different types and levels of lists              Variety of resources                 Structured                          ...
Discussion
Discussion1             What makes a good list?        How do these qualities contribute to    information literacy and in...
Discussion1             What makes a good list?        How do these qualities contribute to    information literacy and in...
RESULTSA separate set of slides have been provided which collate   the post-it notes whichresulted from this discussion   ...
THANK YOU!!!• Ian Corns, Talis Education Limited  ijc@talis.com• Victoria Farmer, Robert Gordon University  v.g.farmer@rgu...
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?
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Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?

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  • Welcome to this symposium about how can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?\n\nIntroduce myself and everyone\n\n
  • \n
  • This session is going to cover…………….presentation, discussion, feedback, and conclusions \n\nBefore we move on to more detail I am going to start by setting the scene a little\n\n
  • Run through slide\n\nNext I’d like to clarify which definition of information literacy we have used to inform this thinking\n\n
  • \nWe have used the CILIP definition\n\nThis definition breaks down even further into certain skills and competencies that are needed to be information literate. \n\n
  • And now that we have these information literacy skills and the idea that reading lists can help develop these we can look further at where they connect.\n\n
  • And now that we have these information literacy skills and the idea that reading lists can help develop these we can look further at where they connect.\n\n
  • And now that we have these information literacy skills and the idea that reading lists can help develop these we can look further at where they connect.\n\n
  • And now that we have these information literacy skills and the idea that reading lists can help develop these we can look further at where they connect.\n\n
  • And now that we have these information literacy skills and the idea that reading lists can help develop these we can look further at where they connect.\n\n
  • And now that we have these information literacy skills and the idea that reading lists can help develop these we can look further at where they connect.\n\n
  • And now that we have these information literacy skills and the idea that reading lists can help develop these we can look further at where they connect.\n\n
  • And now that we have these information literacy skills and the idea that reading lists can help develop these we can look further at where they connect.\n\n
  • In our experience we have seen that all lists help develop – a need for info, the resources available, how to find info\n\nFurther to this there are some lists that help develop – the need to evaluate results, how to work with or exploit results\n\nAnd even a few lists also connect with – ethics and responsibility, how to communication and share, how to manage your findings\n\nThat connection is created though the design of the list\n\n
  • In our experience we have seen that all lists help develop – a need for info, the resources available, how to find info\n\nFurther to this there are some lists that help develop – the need to evaluate results, how to work with or exploit results\n\nAnd even a few lists also connect with – ethics and responsibility, how to communication and share, how to manage your findings\n\nThat connection is created though the design of the list\n\n
  • In our experience we have seen that all lists help develop – a need for info, the resources available, how to find info\n\nFurther to this there are some lists that help develop – the need to evaluate results, how to work with or exploit results\n\nAnd even a few lists also connect with – ethics and responsibility, how to communication and share, how to manage your findings\n\nThat connection is created though the design of the list\n\n
  • In our experience we have seen that all lists help develop – a need for info, the resources available, how to find info\n\nFurther to this there are some lists that help develop – the need to evaluate results, how to work with or exploit results\n\nAnd even a few lists also connect with – ethics and responsibility, how to communication and share, how to manage your findings\n\nThat connection is created though the design of the list\n\n
  • In our experience we have seen that all lists help develop – a need for info, the resources available, how to find info\n\nFurther to this there are some lists that help develop – the need to evaluate results, how to work with or exploit results\n\nAnd even a few lists also connect with – ethics and responsibility, how to communication and share, how to manage your findings\n\nThat connection is created though the design of the list\n\n
  • This design can in either an implicit or explicit fashion. This is actually quite straightforward, we mean……………[CLICK]\n\n\n\n\n
  • Implicit – go through the definition – this is the majority of lists\n\nExplicit – go through the two definitions\n\nOf course there are lots of different types and levels of lists that people can design………………… \n
  • Implicit – go through the definition – this is the majority of lists\n\nExplicit – go through the two definitions\n\nOf course there are lots of different types and levels of lists that people can design………………… \n
  • Implicit – go through the definition – this is the majority of lists\n\nExplicit – go through the two definitions\n\nOf course there are lots of different types and levels of lists that people can design………………… \n
  • Implicit – go through the definition – this is the majority of lists\n\nExplicit – go through the two definitions\n\nOf course there are lots of different types and levels of lists that people can design………………… \n
  • Implicit – go through the definition – this is the majority of lists\n\nExplicit – go through the two definitions\n\nOf course there are lots of different types and levels of lists that people can design………………… \n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • Here we have some of the different types and levels of lists that we have seen coming up:\n\nPick out some examples of features here from the slide to highlight.\n\nWhen we talk about design we mean the resources, the structure, the context, and the features that you can see on the list.\n\nIt is these that create that practical link between a reading list and information literacy.\n\nNow going to show some of the main features of reading lists and talk more specifically about where they connect to the information literacy skills development\n\n
  • http://lib5.leeds.ac.uk/rlists/broker/?bbModuleId=201112_24051_DESN1250&bbListId=_1194321_1&bbLastListId=_1029978_1 \n\nExample of a traditional list i.e. content is all books and it is a simple list with minimal additional information \n\nConnection to information literacy:\n Highlights the need for information to support study \n introduces a range of books and the idea that more than one source is needed\n gives experience in tracking down material as students either borrow or buy the items on the list\n the broad aim also means that the student must judge for themselves which material is the best for them to use\n\nThe first three here are connections that you will get from every list, even the most straightforward.\n\n
  • http://lists.library.qmul.ac.uk/lists/FB7D0CAF-AA6C-26B3-B70A-5459AC59680E.html \n\nExample of a list with a variety of resources e.g. books, journal articles and websites \n\n[CLICK - Remember to scroll down and point out the different types of resources]\n\nConnection to information literacy: \n introduces the student to a range of types of resources and widens their knowledge beyond just books\n gives experience in tracking down the resources\n Illustrates the differences in different types of publication which leads on to being able to see their benefits and the distinctions between them. This in turn starts to help develop evaluation skills/criteria\n A well presented list also shows how information conveyed to others e.g. proper citation details\n\n
  • http://lists.library.qmul.ac.uk/lists/FB7D0CAF-AA6C-26B3-B70A-5459AC59680E.html \n\nExample of a list with a variety of resources e.g. books, journal articles and websites \n\n[CLICK - Remember to scroll down and point out the different types of resources]\n\nConnection to information literacy: \n introduces the student to a range of types of resources and widens their knowledge beyond just books\n gives experience in tracking down the resources\n Illustrates the differences in different types of publication which leads on to being able to see their benefits and the distinctions between them. This in turn starts to help develop evaluation skills/criteria\n A well presented list also shows how information conveyed to others e.g. proper citation details\n\n
  • http://lists.library.qmul.ac.uk/lists/FB7D0CAF-AA6C-26B3-B70A-5459AC59680E.html \n\nExample of a list with a variety of resources e.g. books, journal articles and websites \n\n[CLICK - Remember to scroll down and point out the different types of resources]\n\nConnection to information literacy: \n introduces the student to a range of types of resources and widens their knowledge beyond just books\n gives experience in tracking down the resources\n Illustrates the differences in different types of publication which leads on to being able to see their benefits and the distinctions between them. This in turn starts to help develop evaluation skills/criteria\n A well presented list also shows how information conveyed to others e.g. proper citation details\n\n
  • http://lists.library.qmul.ac.uk/lists/FB7D0CAF-AA6C-26B3-B70A-5459AC59680E.html \n\nExample of a list with a variety of resources e.g. books, journal articles and websites \n\n[CLICK - Remember to scroll down and point out the different types of resources]\n\nConnection to information literacy: \n introduces the student to a range of types of resources and widens their knowledge beyond just books\n gives experience in tracking down the resources\n Illustrates the differences in different types of publication which leads on to being able to see their benefits and the distinctions between them. This in turn starts to help develop evaluation skills/criteria\n A well presented list also shows how information conveyed to others e.g. proper citation details\n\n
  • http://readinglists.ucl.ac.uk/lists/91E81554-9E34-901A-6696-D720377B2A4E.html \n\nExample of a list that asks the student to perform a specific task connected to the reading \n\nConnection to information literacy: \n tracking down the resources\n gives experience in reading, absorbing and applying the knowledge gained from the reading to specific questions which is working with / exploiting / communicating information\n it also shows the importance in understanding what you need to research and generating appropriate questions to express your information needs\n\n
  • http://resourcelists.rgu.ac.uk/lists/A8786A57-A468-E7EB-7061-1B4EBCAE6666.html \n\nExample of a list that asks the students to find journal articles for themselves but gives guidance to resources to track down the articles \n\nConnection to information literacy:\n highlights a range of available resources\n gives experience in tracking down information\n allows the student to evaluate what they find as they need to pick the final articles for themselves, this is an intermediary level as the students are still given a level of guidance\n this reading and the task connected to it also gives experience in communicating results\n allows the student to generate search terms for the journals or use browsing techniques\n\n\n
  • http://resourcelists.rgu.ac.uk/lists/6E70536E-2362-1F5E-DCC9-9B35083DB115.html \n\nHere we have two examples [CLICK TO ZOOM]:\n1) A list that asks students to do some searching for themselves within a database although some guidance is given about what to search for \n2) A list that shows some evaluation of the resources included\n\nConnection to information literacy:\n it requires the student use search techniques\n evaluate what is found and choose the most appropriate material for the topic\n the importance of critically judging the material that you find even when on a reading list\n\n
  • http://resourcelists.rgu.ac.uk/lists/6E70536E-2362-1F5E-DCC9-9B35083DB115.html \n\nHere we have two examples [CLICK TO ZOOM]:\n1) A list that asks students to do some searching for themselves within a database although some guidance is given about what to search for \n2) A list that shows some evaluation of the resources included\n\nConnection to information literacy:\n it requires the student use search techniques\n evaluate what is found and choose the most appropriate material for the topic\n the importance of critically judging the material that you find even when on a reading list\n\n
  • http://resourcelists.rgu.ac.uk/lists/6E70536E-2362-1F5E-DCC9-9B35083DB115.html \n\nHere we have two examples [CLICK TO ZOOM]:\n1) A list that asks students to do some searching for themselves within a database although some guidance is given about what to search for \n2) A list that shows some evaluation of the resources included\n\nConnection to information literacy:\n it requires the student use search techniques\n evaluate what is found and choose the most appropriate material for the topic\n the importance of critically judging the material that you find even when on a reading list\n\n
  • http://resourcelists.rgu.ac.uk/lists/4C487EAC-B449-5FA3-23DB-0EF71DED8634.html \n\nThis is an example of a list that has structured its material into subject areas and provided detailed contextual notes about each resource. \n\nConnection to information literacy:\n highlights resources that are available and gives the student practice in tracking them down\n starts the student thinking about the content of the articles and enables them to decide if they want to read them for their research\n has a more discursive and advanced feel and is aimed at enabling students to work with the resources and then communicate their understanding of what they have read\n\nSo here I have highlighted just a few features of lists and their connection to information literacy skills development:\n Choice of resources\n Giving students task i.e. giving the list context\n Giving guidance\n Creating an open list that allows students to search for themselves\n Evaluating resources\n Using structure and notes to add in more skills\n\nNow I am going to hand over to Colin who is going to talk about a list explicitly developed to teach information literacy / literature searching / research skills which still has a subject context.\n\n
  • http://resourcelists.rgu.ac.uk/lists/4C487EAC-B449-5FA3-23DB-0EF71DED8634.html \n\nThis is an example of a list that has structured its material into subject areas and provided detailed contextual notes about each resource. \n\nConnection to information literacy:\n highlights resources that are available and gives the student practice in tracking them down\n starts the student thinking about the content of the articles and enables them to decide if they want to read them for their research\n has a more discursive and advanced feel and is aimed at enabling students to work with the resources and then communicate their understanding of what they have read\n\nSo here I have highlighted just a few features of lists and their connection to information literacy skills development:\n Choice of resources\n Giving students task i.e. giving the list context\n Giving guidance\n Creating an open list that allows students to search for themselves\n Evaluating resources\n Using structure and notes to add in more skills\n\nNow I am going to hand over to Colin who is going to talk about a list explicitly developed to teach information literacy / literature searching / research skills which still has a subject context.\n\n
  • This is a list designed not by an academic but by a librarian. \n\nThe list attempts to address the question of how to do a literature search in the pharmacy discipline. \n\nIt uses Talis Aspire to deliver the content.\n\nThe list is for stage 3/third year Pharmacy students on a 4 year Masters programme. Many (upwards of 50% in some cohorts) of the students on this course programme already have an undergraduate degree in sciences such as chemistry or biochemistry. \n\nInformation literacy is a regarded as a core competency and a graduate attribute possessed by students entering regulated health professions. \n\nThe list is intended to provide a high level of support and advice to enable students to gather resources from a range of suitably academic sources to address any discipline specific question. \n\nThe list is geared to the module learning outcome:\n\nDemonstrate an ability to locate and critically appraise relevant published literature.\n\nIt is does therefore explicitly set out to support this outcome. \n\nThe list addresses students directly in an informal way. \n\nIt is structured, research centred and e-centric deliberately to meet the needs of pharmacy professionals. \n\nIt attempts to place literature searching within a disciplinary context by: \n\nExplaining what “literature” is \n\nraising issues about conventional and open access publishing; \n\nnoting how the UK HE internet infrastructure makes it possible for anyone in HE to do effective lit searches and the role of library collections and so on; \n\nincluding some known touchstones such as the BP, PJ Online and a few individual journal titles - all valid resources; \n\nexpanding the scope of the resource available to encompass more or less the whole of scientific scholarly literature but locally contextualised, emphasising Ebsco-Host databases and other locally supported bib databases, full text publisher resources and so on.\n\nThe inclusion of the “other resources” section helps to demonstrate that public health information in its broadest sense, much as it ought to be evidence based, can deliver confusing messages. My choice is somewhat selective and biased toward things I consider to be “relevant” while at the same time I do emphasise the importance of criticality. \n\nThe typical literature search, search techniques, keeping records and maintaining current awareness is conventional information literacy territory but also introduces newer methods of acquiring current knowledge such as through RSS feeds and twitter. \n\nThe last section is intended to provide a link between the application of the contents of the list to professional practice in Pharmacy. \n\nIt very briefly addresses a specific question about a therapeutic drug intervention in conjunction with an illness – in this case lithium therapy and depression. \n\nIt introduces video segments to explain the therapy and contrasts this with the patient experience, expressed in a video blog, finally signing off with an invitation to students to make contact for further support. \n \nHand over to Ian …\n\n\n
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  • Farmer, MacLean & Corns (1) - How can reading lists be effective information literacy tools?

    1. 1. How can reading lists beeffective informationliteracy tools? Victoria Farmer, Robert Gordon University Colin MacLean, Robert Gordon University Ian Corns, Talis Education Limited
    2. 2. LIVE PRESENTATION ON YOUTUBE! You’ve seen the slides, now watch the video! Available now on YouTube Home: http://www.youtube.com/talisaspire Direct: http://youtu.be/oR3E_cDaVR4 2
    3. 3. Content of symposium• Presentation – Propose the concept that reading lists can develop and enhance information literacy skills• Discussion – Split into groups to discuss themes from the presentation• Feedback from groups• Conclusions
    4. 4. Reading lists and skills development• Reading lists have a variety of purposes.• The most well known and widely acknowledged is to provide subject knowledge.• However they also can help with skills development such as: – Critical reading – Independent learning• We contend that reading lists can play a critical role in developing information literacy skills.
    5. 5. CILIP information literacy definition and skills Information literacy is knowing when and why youneed information, where to find it and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner. CILIP, (2011). Information literacy: the skills. (online). London: CILIP. http://www.cilip.org.uk/get-involved/advocacy/information-literacy/pages/skills.aspx
    6. 6. CILIP information literacy definition and skills Information literacy is knowing when and why youneed information, where to find it and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner. CILIP, (2011). Information literacy: the skills. (online). London: CILIP. http://www.cilip.org.uk/get-involved/advocacy/information-literacy/pages/skills.aspx
    7. 7. CILIP information literacy definition and skills Information literacy is knowing when and why youneed information, where to find it and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner. A need for information How to work with or exploit results The resources available Ethics and responsibility of use How to find information How to communicate/share your findings The need to evaluate results How to manage your findings CILIP, (2011). Information literacy: the skills. (online). London: CILIP. http://www.cilip.org.uk/get-involved/advocacy/information-literacy/pages/skills.aspx
    8. 8. Where is the connection?
    9. 9. Where is the connection? All A need for information The resources available How to find information
    10. 10. Where is the connection? All A need for information The resources available How to find information Some The need to evaluate results How to work with or exploit results
    11. 11. Where is the connection? All A need for information The resources available How to find information Some The need to evaluate results How to work with or exploit results Few Ethics and responsibility of useHow to communicate or share your findings How to manage your findings
    12. 12. How is this done?IMPLICIT EXPLICIT
    13. 13. How is this done?IMPLICITEXPLICIT
    14. 14. How is this done? • list helps develop information literacyIMPLICIT skills even though it is not designed to achieve thisEXPLICIT
    15. 15. How is this done? • list helps develop information literacyIMPLICIT skills even though it is not designed to achieve thisEXPLICIT 1 2
    16. 16. How is this done? • list helps develop information literacyIMPLICIT skills even though it is not designed to achieve thisEXPLICIT 1• list primarily used for learning purposes but exhibits deliberate design to enhance information literacy skills 2
    17. 17. How is this done? • list helps develop information literacyIMPLICIT skills even though it is not designed to achieve thisEXPLICIT 1• list primarily used for learning purposes but exhibits deliberate design to enhance information literacy skills 2• list designed solely to teach information literacy skills
    18. 18. Different types and levels of lists Many different types & levels of lists with different features - ALL can promote information literacy.
    19. 19. Different types and levels of lists Variety of resources Structured format Introductory Research-centric E-CentricOpen/ Many different types &Closed levels of lists with different Formal/ Informal features - ALL can promote information literacy. Task based Broad aim Contextualised Defined reading Advanced Book based
    20. 20. Discussion
    21. 21. Discussion1 What makes a good list? How do these qualities contribute to information literacy and information literacy skills development?
    22. 22. Discussion1 What makes a good list? How do these qualities contribute to information literacy and information literacy skills development?2 How can we support academics to engage more fully with reading list development and incorporate features that develop information literacy skills in to their lists?
    23. 23. RESULTSA separate set of slides have been provided which collate the post-it notes whichresulted from this discussion 19
    24. 24. THANK YOU!!!• Ian Corns, Talis Education Limited ijc@talis.com• Victoria Farmer, Robert Gordon University v.g.farmer@rgu.ac.uk• Colin MacLean, Robert Gordon University C.maclean@rgu.ac.uk

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