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Information Literacy: Elements Of A Maturing Discipline - Dr. Karen F. Kaufmann & Dr. Clarence Maybee

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Information Literacy:
ELEMENTSOFA MATURING DISCIPLINE
– Dr. Karen F. Kaufmann & Dr. Clarence Maybee
– LILAC 2022 April 11-...

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Research points to Information
LiteracyAsASoftApplied Discipline
– This investigation builds on the work of information
li...

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ELEMENTS of a Discipline
• Knowledge Practices
• Knowledge Community
(Beecher &Trowler, 2001)
"...in order to have externa...

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Information Literacy: Elements Of A Maturing Discipline - Dr. Karen F. Kaufmann & Dr. Clarence Maybee

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Presented at LILAC 2022

Presented at LILAC 2022

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Information Literacy: Elements Of A Maturing Discipline - Dr. Karen F. Kaufmann & Dr. Clarence Maybee

  1. 1. Information Literacy: ELEMENTSOFA MATURING DISCIPLINE – Dr. Karen F. Kaufmann & Dr. Clarence Maybee – LILAC 2022 April 11-13 Manchester, UK
  2. 2. Research points to Information LiteracyAsASoftApplied Discipline – This investigation builds on the work of information literacy researchers SheilaWebber and Bill Johnston, who identified information literacy as: § an emerging soft applied discipline in 1999 § a maturing soft applied discipline in 2017.
  3. 3. ELEMENTS of a Discipline • Knowledge Practices • Knowledge Community (Beecher &Trowler, 2001) "...in order to have external impact, you need to have internal strength" (Webber & Johnston, 2017, p. 169)
  4. 4. ILTheory informing Practice & Practice informing Theory Begin with IL Theory Practice Theory Research Literature Practice
  5. 5. If IL is a Discipline… –How does recognizing IL as a discipline change or impact practice? – Shared vocabulary – Strenthens our IL narrative – Situated as understood by other disciplinary faculty – Easier to integrate into curriculum – Opportunities for more credit courses to be developed and taught – Allows for more dialogue about IL as transdisciplinary – Holistic understanding of IL as a social practice – Embraces sub-disciplinary literacies
  6. 6. Characteristics of a Discipline 1) COMMUNITY OF SCHOLARS 2) COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS 3) ETHICAL CONCERNS 4)TRADITION AND HISTORY OF INQUIRY 5) SPECIFIC MODES OF INQUIRY 6) INFORMATION LITERACY KNOWLEDGE AND CURRICULA
  7. 7. 1. Community of Scholars – This focus is on indicators of IL communities of information literacy research and education. – This could include descriptions of information literacy organizations, groups, institutes, and other alliances, that focus on information literacy advocacy, research, educational development, and others. – Also identified by professional organizations, and conferences where scholars, teachers, researchers, faculty academic librarians, and others interested in information literacy meet, converse, and present research findings and methods.
  8. 8. 2. Communications Networks – IL communication networks that are in place and have emerged over time such as academic journals, conferences, academic publishers, blogs, and other communication platforms that act as channels of communication for the information literacy community. – Recognition of a Communications Network among scholars, researchers, and practitioners of information literacy at the International, national, regional organizations, sections, special interest groups, blogs, online communities, with iSchools, and other academic and information professional ethos. – Standards & Frameworks codified by the Community of Scholars and the Tradition of Inquiry supports the maturation of the discipline.
  9. 9. 3. Ethical Concerns – This focus concerns the information literacy community in addressing concerns equity in the use of information, IL as a social practice, in the humanities where IL and its core disciplinary nature supports ethical use and access of information. – Code of ethics that has also emerged in the last twenty years identifies related contexts such as: social justice that addresses antiracism, social equity; the democratization of information which is a key component of the LIS tenets that are vital to information ethos and flow; Information use that addresses privacy, equitable access, sharing, and many legal ethical questions addressed both nationally and internationally and finally the notion of accessibility which has wide-ranging implications and related contextual, collegial and professional associations.
  10. 10. 4. Tradition and History of Inquiry • The tradition and history of inquiry speaks to the nature of information literacy as transdisciplinary and describe occurrences in the field leading up to its emergence and potential recognition as a discipline, including the development of the language practices of the discipline. • This explicates a timeline of maturation and history of literature, research, and related content. • Standards and Frameworks have been adopted by professional organizations such as SCONUL, UNESCO, ACRL, IFLA, and others across the globe explicate traditions and history of information literacy emerging as a discipline.
  11. 11. 5. Specific Modes of Inquiry – The theories and methodologies used by information literacy researchers and educators to investigate the human experience of using information, as well as to create meaningful educational experiences. – Methodologies identified in the literature such as phenomenography, phenomenology, mixed methods, qualitative and quantitative methods verify the diverse ways that information literacy has been researched over the last twenty years. – Acknowledging the Epistemological approaches - or ways of knowing - used when examining information literacy and published in the literature such as consciousness and the information experience also support the notion that information literacy is a discipline. (Bruce, 2000; Budd,2020).
  12. 12. 6. Information Literacy Knowledge and Curricula – This element relates to aspects of the body of knowledge, skills, and values that comprise information literacy, such as information literacy curricula and expectations for learning about using information across the human lifespan. – Pedagogies andTheories used in the discipline includes informed learning, active learning, and asset-based pedagogy, and theories of influence such as critical information literacy, threshold concepts, variation theory, relevance theory, and others that support worldwide information literacy communities of practice.
  13. 13. UsingA new Lens: IL as a Discipline What IF we used the lens of IL as a discipline for future conversations as researchers, academics, and practitioners? What happens when we converse using the lens of IL as a discipline?
  14. 14. IL as A Discipline Lens - Conversations How does this IL as a discipline lens promote inclusive ways of thinking about sub-disciplines: such as: Media Literacy Digital Literacy Health Literacy Visual Literacy Financial Literacy Data Literacy How does this new IL disciplinary lens shape conversations by LIS faculty, researchers and practitioners?
  15. 15. Small group discussions Let's talk in small groups to explore this idea of IL as a Discipline. We'll participate in a poll in a few minutes to collect your thoughts and share.
  16. 16. Discussion Prompt 1 –Would the recognition of IL as a discipline have implications for you work? What might they be?
  17. 17. Discussion Prompt 2 –What happens when we converse using the lens of IL as a discipline?
  18. 18. Discussion Prompt 3 –What are your thoughts about possible hurdles, challenges, advantages or benefits to moving forward with the recognition of IL as a Discipline?
  19. 19. Reflections Interactive Polls
  20. 20. Join at slido.com #641362 ⓘ Start presenting to display the joining instructions on this slide.
  21. 21. In a few words, describe your initial thoughts on IL being recognized as a Discipline. ⓘ Start presenting to display the poll results on this slide.
  22. 22. What terms (words) should be included in the IL disciplinary vocabulary as key concepts? ⓘ Start presenting to display the poll results on this slide.
  23. 23. Please rate the notion of IL as a Discipline. ⓘ Start presenting to display the poll results on this slide.
  24. 24. ThankYou!
  25. 25. Karen F. Kaufmann, PhD Research & Instruction Librarian, Professor Seminole State College of Florida Email: kaufmannk@seminolestate.edu Telephone: +13212745841 Twitter: @literacyfan Clarence Maybee, PhD Professor and W. Wayne Booker Endowed Chair in Information Literacy Purdue University Email: cmaybee@purdue.edu Telephone: +17654947603 Twitter: @cmaybee
  26. 26. References ACRL (Association of College & Research Libraries) (Association of College and Research Libraries) Working Group on Global Perspectives for Information Literacy, Student Learning, and Information Literacy Committee. (2017) Global Perspectives on Information Literacy: Fostering dialogue for international understanding. https://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/publications/whitepapers/GlobalPerspectives_InfoLit.pdf Beecher, T. & Trowler, P. (2001). Academic Tribes and Territories: Intellectual enquiry and the culture of disciplines (2nd ed). The Society for Research into Higher Education & The Open University Press. Biglan, A. (1973). The characteristics of subject matter in different academic areas. Journal of Applied Psychology, 57(3), 195. Bruce, Christine (2000). Information literacy research: dimensions of the emerging collective consciousness. Australian Academic and Research Libraries, 31 (2). pp. 91-109. Budd, J.M. (2020). Information literacy and consciousness. Journal of Documentation, 76 (6), pp. 1377-1391. https://doi.org/10.1108/JD-02-2020-0026 Chen, C.-C., Wang, N.-C., Tu, Y.-F. and Lin, H.J. (2021), Research Trends from a Decade (2011–2020) for Information Literacy in Higher Education: Content and Bibliometric Mapping Analysis. Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 58: 48-59. https://doi.org/10.1002/pra2.435 Faulkner, K. & Ford-Baxter, T. (2021). An analysis of references to information literacy in national disciplinary standards. Libraries and the Academy, 21, No. 4 (2021), pp. 797–83 https://preprint.press.jhu.edu/portal/sites/ajm/files/faulkner.pdf Hicks, A., Lloyd, A., Inskip, C., McKinney, P., & Walton, G. (2022). Leveraging information literacy: mapping the conceptual influence and appropriation of information literacy in other disciplinary landscapes. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10145016/1/Hicks_Leveraging%20information%20literacy- %20Mapping%20the%20conceptual%20influence%20and%20appropriation%20of%20information%20literacy%20in%20other%20disciplinary%20landscapes_AA M.pdf International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) (2021). IFLA Trend Report 2021 Update. https://repository.ifla.org/handle/123456789/1830 Johnston, B., & Webber, S. (1999). Information literacy as an academic discipline: An action research approach to developing a credit bearing class for business undergraduates. New fields for research in the 21st century: Proceedings of the 3rd British Nordic Conference on Library and Information Studies, 183-197. Lavoie, B. (2021, September 29). The inoperability imperative: Separated by a commone language? Hanging Together. https://hangingtogether.org/the-interoperability- imperative-in-research-support/ Lloyd, A. (2012), "Information literacy as a socially enacted practice: Sensitizing themes for an emerging perspective of people-in-practice", Journal of Documentation, Vol. 68 No. 6, pp. 772-783. https://doi.org/10.1108/00220411211277037 Lloyd, A. (2017). Information literacy and literacies of information: a mid-range theory and model. Journal Of Information Literacy, 11(1), 91-105. doi:10.11645/11.1.2185 O’Keeffe, V. (1970). History of the Term “The Structure of Disciplines.” The Journal of Educational Thought (JET) / Revue de La Pensée Éducative, 4(1), 55–59. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23768145 Webber, S. & Johnston. (2017). Information literacy: conceptions, context and the formation of a discipline. Journal of Information Literacy, 11(1), p156-183. Whitworth, A. (2006). Communicative competence in the information age: Towards a critical theory of information literacy education. Innovation in Teaching and Learning in Information and Computer Sciences, 5(1), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.11120/ital.2006.05010007

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