Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Having a shufti: using student focus group findings to map unchartered territory in the information literacy landscape. Walton & Pope

48 views

Published on

Presented at LILAC 2010

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Having a shufti: using student focus group findings to map unchartered territory in the information literacy landscape. Walton & Pope

  1. 1. Welcome Introduction Author name Information Services Having a shufti: using student focus group findings to enrich existing ASK software Alison Pope and Dr. Geoff Walton Information Services 29- 31 March 2010
  2. 2. Shufti: a definition • http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/shufti?view=uk • /shoofti/ • • noun (pl. shuftis) Brit. informal a quick look or reconnoitre. • — ORIGIN World War Two military slang: from an Arabic word meaning ‘try to see’
  3. 3. Introduction • Background: What is ASK? • Why was ASK developed? • Our research • What the students said • What we did next • Concluding remarks
  4. 4. Background: What is ASK? • Web-based tool • Supports first year undergraduates with first assignment • Launched October 2006 • June 2007 – Awarded CILIP UC&R Award for Innovation • More info see Adams, Pope & Walton, 2008
  5. 5. Why was ASK Developed? • Contribution to SU’s Widening Participation agenda (See Pope & Walton, 2009) • IL Statement of Good Practice • IL Project Group • Deliverable to support IL at Staffordshire University
  6. 6. Our research • Methodology – Wanted users to shape any modifications to ASK – Qualitative strategy (following Bryman, 2008) • Focus Group(s) to capture the ‘student voice’ – Inductive – asked students how they go about planning an essay • Participants – Focus group of first year students on humanities and social sciences awards
  7. 7. What the students said • “I did like background reading at first, wider research to get the general idea and then funnelled it down into the essentials that we needed.” • “What I didn’t know, what I needed to find out and then how I would assess that to make my own sort of recommendations from there really and then deciding on what source of information I was going to use.” • “I need to start to do some reading before I can actually put ideas down […] before I can start to put the words down I need to go away and look at websites and see what other people say about it.”
  8. 8. What we did next • These quotations demonstrate a visible common theme in student thinking and approach – “background reading at first” – “what I needed to find out and then how I would assess that” – “I need to start to do some reading before I can actually put ideas down” • i.e., doing some background searching and reading to scope the topic • This meant that the structure of ASK needed to be modified to reflect this behaviour • Section 1 “Where do I start” is expanded to include a new section called “Having a first look”
  9. 9. Having a first look: sources and keywords • Use some words in the question to search the Library Catalogue and Google • This will help you to do two things • Find out what information and resources are out there (enough, not enough or too much information?) • Help you to decide if there is a smaller aspect of your topic to concentrate on
  10. 10. Having a first look: scoping and iteration • You might find that there isn’t enough material to support the topic you have chosen OR there may be too much stuff to select from. • If this happens, either go back to your question and chose a different set of words to search with or try a different question. You may need to do this several times to get a clear picture of what resources are available for you to use. • If you aren’t sure about what sort of words to use in a search you can ask your subject librarian for help.
  11. 11. Having a first look: evaluation • Simple evaluation criteria. • Ask yourself three things: • Is it relevant enough to your topic, in other words is it bang on or does it just mention your topic in passing? • Is it reliable, that is, is it published by a reputable individual or organisation? • Is it up-to-date, in other words does it reflect current thinking on your topic?
  12. 12. Podcast examples • Sharon’s wise words • Roger’s practical plan • Reminder of ASK URL: • http://www.staffs.ac.uk/ask
  13. 13. Concluding remarks • We actively seek the student ‘voice’ to drive forward changes to ASK • Continue to add new features such as podcasts • Constant beta now the norm for ASK as it becomes more of a Web 2.0 tool • More qualitative data has been gathered and is about to be analysed – watch this space!
  14. 14. References • Adams, J. Pope, A and Walton, G. (2008). Using Web 2.0 to Enhance the Staffordshire University Assignment Survival Kit (ASK). In Parker, J. E. and Godwin, P (eds). Information Literacy Meets Library 2.0. London: Facet Publishing, pp139-150. • Bryman, A. (2008). Social Research Methods. Oxford: Oxford University Press. • Pope, A. & Walton, G. (2009). Information and Media Literacies: Sharpening our Vision in the Twenty First Century. In Leaning, M. (ed). Issues in Information and Media Literacy: Education, Practice and Pedagogy. Informing Science Press, pp1-29.
  15. 15. Welcome Introduction Author name Information Services Having a shufti: using student focus group findings to enrich existing ASK software Alison Pope and Dr. Geoff Walton Information Services 29- 31 March 2010

×