Making IL relevant in employment settings - Stéphane Goldstein, Charlie Inskip, Jane Secker & Geoff Walton

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Making IL relevant in employment settings - Stéphane Goldstein, Charlie Inskip, Jane Secker & Geoff Walton

  1. 1. 1 Making information literacy relevant in employment settings Stéphane Goldstein – Research Information Network / InformAll Charlie Inskip – University College London / InformAll Jane Secker – London School of Economics and Political Science / InformAll / CILIP IL Group Geoff Walton – Northumbria University / InformAll / CILIP IL Group LILAC2015 University of Newcastle – 9 April 2015
  2. 2. • A coalition of partners working together to promote the value of information and research data literacy in HE and beyond • A collectively-run programme to enable activities which help to advance LIS knowledge and skills • Grant-funded by Higher Education Funding Council for England until early 2015, managed by the Research Information Network • Changed its name from RIDLs June 2014 Important premise: • Partners not limited to the library world: others players have a stake! • Important to build a network that capitalises on different outlooks • Academic librarians, data management specialists, career & professional development experts, information sciences researchers… and now reaching out to stakeholders beyond academia What is InformAll? 2
  3. 3. InformAll programme 2014 • Providing networking opportunities and collective source of expertise for its members • Criteria for describing, reviewing & assessing training interventions • Information literacy and employment: investigating how IL is perceived by players at the interface between HE and employment – Basis for widening the dialogue about IL to sectors where information literacy is less well recognised • International engagement – ECIL, UNESCO, IFLA, European Commission… 3
  4. 4. Some recent developments on IL and employment • Report on IL as a transferable attribute for individuals moving from HE into employment (Goldstein, 2014) – Views from sample of players at the interface between HE and employers: careers advisers, professional bodies, accreditation agencies, employers, trade unions and other employment-related bodies • Annotated bibliography on IL in the workplace (Williams, Cooper and Wavell, 2014) • Literature review on IL as an attribute of employability (Inskip, 2014) • Roundtable on information competencies in the workplace, organised jointly by CILIP and InformAll, March 2015 • New project on the value of IL for employers, commissioned by the CILIP IL Group and undertaken by InformAll in association with the University Manchester, March-June 2015 • This work reflects an emerging dialogue between interlocutors at the interface between HE and employment to consider jointly how IL relates to their policies and practices How might we capitalise on this work? 4
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  6. 6. Three overlapping questions to consider 6 • What are the purpose and merits of engaging with stakeholders at the interface between higher education and employment with regards to IL? • What are the best practical ways of engaging with these stakeholders, in a way that makes IL relevant to their needs and priorities – and do some of them warrant particular attention? • What role can be played by the CILIP IL Group, InformAll and other interested parties in moving this agenda forward? The following factors might help with addressing these questions
  7. 7. IL is relevant to employment settings… …even if not recognised explicitly 7 “Librarians, college educators and accrediting agencies are placing increased emphasis on promoting the development of information literacy skills in their students. At the same time, the business community has acknowledged the importance of the “knowledge worker”. The problem is that corporations do not yet formally recognize information literacy as a core competency for their workers, even though these same corporations do in practice require information literacy skills on the job” Klusek and Bornstein, 2006 This was true nine years ago, and it probably still is…
  8. 8. Information literacy by another name On the basis of annotated bibliography by Williams, Cooper and Wavell (2014) • Workplace IL places an emphasis on: – social, informal, contextualised processing of information – the transformation of information into knowledge – information creation, packaging, and organisation – data sharing • In the workplace, people are key information sources; information processing is a shared activity • Differences from how IL is viewed in HE – less emphasis on search skills and finding information – relatively little use of libraries – no need for everyone to have all IL skills (because, as suggested above, different aspects of information processing are shared between employees with different responsibilities) 8
  9. 9. Business challenges that might be addressed by IL • Business communications • Workplace learning • Dealing with information overload • Coping with uncertainties • Decision-making • Ensuring evidence-based practice Scholarly literature in recent years suggests that all these factors are influenced by IL in the workplace 9
  10. 10. The value of information literacy to businesses? • Operational efficiency and business opportunities, through the promotion of company-wide knowledge creation, sharing and using • Underpinning important workplace processes, including information processing, information/records management, R&D, professional ethics/code of conduct • Organisational competitiveness and profitability, through: – the competence to use information effectively – a strategic approach to information • Success in the marketplace, through recognising the impact and significance of accurate and timely information • Critical business value, through the fostering among staff of confidence and competence in interacting with information • Conversely, lack of IL has a significant financial cost, through time wasted as a result of inefficient information search strategies 10
  11. 11. Some thoughts from the recent roundtable Roundtable in March: players from different communities, including employers and careers advisers, considered the relevance of IL to their policies, strategies and practices; and how to promote that relevance in the workplace. Some suggestions from the discussion: • Curate existing good practice resources • Develop case studies for individuals and organisations • Associate IL with cybersecurity, for which there are often clear expectations • Find ways of advocating for IL • Integrate IL into school curriculum, alongside digital literacy • Adapt CILIP PKSB (Professional Knowledge and Skill Base) for workplace Can we add to that list? 11
  12. 12. Digital literacy: a means of promoting IL? • Digital literacy and skills increasingly recognised as a policy issue over the past year: – UK Government’s Digital Inclusion Strategy (April 2014) – UK Digital Taskforce report, Digital Skills for Tomorrow’s World (July 2014) – House of Commons report on Responsible Use of Data (November 2014) – Go ON UK’s definition of digital skills (2014) – House of Lords report on the UK’s Digital Future (February 2015) – and at a European level, Framework for Digital Competence, under the auspices of the European Commission (Ferrari, 2013) • Digital literacy often perceived by policymakers as a ‘tecchie’ issue: ICT skills, computing skills, coding… This perception needs to be corrected! • Digital literacy overlaps with IL, and because of its currency, perhaps it can be used as a vehicle for carrying messages about IL 12
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  14. 14. So let’s return to our three questions… • What are the purpose and merits of engaging with stakeholders at the interface between higher education and employment with regards to IL? • What are the best practical ways of engaging with these stakeholders, in a way that makes IL relevant to their needs and priorities – and do some of them warrant particular attention? • What role can be played by the CILIP IL Group, InformAll and other interested parties in moving this agenda forward? 14
  15. 15. References • Ferrari, A., 2013. A Framework for Developing and Understanding Digital Competence in Europe. Joint Research Centre, for the European Commission. Available at http://ftp.jrc.es/EURdoc/JRC83167.pdf • Go ON UK, 2014. Basic Digital Skills Definition. Available at http://www.go-on.co.uk/basic-digital-skills/ • Goldstein, S., 2014. Transferring information know-how – Information literacy at the interface between higher education and employment. InformAll. Available at http://www.researchinfonet.org/infolit/ridls/transferable-skills/transferable-il/ • HM Government (Cabinet Office), 2014. Digital Inclusion Strategy. Available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/government-digital-inclusion-strategy/government-digital-inclusion-strategy • House of Commons Science and Technology Committee, 2014. Responsible Use of Data. Available at http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmselect/cmsctech/245/24502.htm • House of Lords Select Committee on Digital Skills, 2015. Make or Break: the UK’s Digital Future. Available at http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/lords-select/digital-skills-committee/news/report- published/ • Inskip, I., 2014. Information literacy is for life, not just for a good degree: a literature review. CILIP. Available at http://www.cilip.org.uk/sites/default/files/documents/IL%20in%20the%20workplace%20literature%20review%20Dr%20C%20I nskip%20June%202014.%20doc.pdf • Klusek, L. and Bornstein, J., 2006. Information literacy skills for business careers. Journal of Business & Finance Librarianship, 11(4), pp. 3-21. Abstract at http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J109v11n04_02#.VRQH_-G2rGw • UK Digital Skills Taskforce, 2014. Digital Skills for Tomorrow’s World (interim report). Available at http://policy.bcs.org/sites/policy.bcs.org/files/Interim%20report.pdf • Williams, D., Cooper, K and Wavell, C., 2014. Information Literacy in the Workplace: an annotated bibliography. Robert Gordon University Institute for Management, Governance & Society (IMaGeS) in association with InformAll. Available at: http://www.researchinfonet.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Workplace-IL-annotated-bibliography.pdf 15
  16. 16. Thank you for taking part! Interested in joining InformAll? Go to www.informall.org.uk - #informall Stéphane Goldstein – stephane.goldstein@researchinfonet.org Charlie Inskip – c.inskip@ucl.ac.uk Jane Secker – j.secker@lse.ac.uk Geoff Walton – geoff.walton@northumbria.ac.uk 16

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