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From strategy to reality - Perera, Hartiss & Sinclair

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Presented at LILAC 2019

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From strategy to reality - Perera, Hartiss & Sinclair

  1. 1. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m The nuts and bolts of embedding a skills framework within the curriculum From strategy to reality A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m I n f o r m a t i o n a n d L i b r a r y S e r v i c e s BA Primary Education Accelerated Degree A Case Study
  2. 2. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Context The aspiration: A strategy to embed information literacy and academic skills in the curriculum What did we do? Library Services team created a wish-list that later became a skills framework for students progressing from Level 3 to Level 7 How did we get there? Consultation, consultation, consultation – with very good support from senior management
  3. 3. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Curious, informed, accomplished A skills framework to be embedded in the teaching curriculum  Embedded rather than bolted on  Part of the teaching team  Timely delivery of material Faculty consultation Information and Library Services
  4. 4. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m The nuts and bolts of embedding the plan  A skills “menu”  The students & the challenges of an accelerated degree  The big plan- slotting menu choices into the curriculum  Deciding what we can offer and how to deliver it  Academic Support team-Faculty meetings to agree support  On-going liaison
  5. 5. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Information and Library Services The Benefits  Provides greater engagement with both students and staff, enabling academic skills tutors and librarians to have regular and sustained contact with students and work more collaboratively with staff;  Providing academic skills that students can apply within the context of their subject area;  Promoting a better quality of learning that the ‘bolt on’ approach to academic skills often fails to achieve;  It also allows students to engage better with library support services.
  6. 6. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Challenges  This has been resource-heavy – being a comparatively small team this has presented occasional difficulties;  Namely, taking resources away from our normal service (one-to- one provision, workshops, staff meetings)  Since this is a pilot and a work in progress, there is an element of ‘learning on the hoof’ but being adaptable is an advantage!  Finding the time to create a bank of resources, both paper and electronic;  Nonetheless, a major advantage is it has allowed academic skills and library staff to forge a more cohesive identity.
  7. 7. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Next steps  Evaluate impact  Replicate success factors and improve on what’s not worked so well  Investigate alternative, less resource-heavy modes of delivery ⎻ Online and flipped learning sessions ⎻ Peer-Assisted Learning ⎻ Develop a range of teaching resources for the Faculty
  8. 8. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Impact Independent learning skills survey First assessment results  Formative Assessment: 13 failed to progress  Summative Assessment: 1 failed to progress Student/staff survey results
  9. 9. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Student survey results 1. The skills support I have received has helped me progress in my studies 2. I know what’s required of me to do well in my assessments 3. I know where to go to find the information I need for my studies 4. I have developed the skills and knowledge I need to progress to the next level of my studies
  10. 10. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Teaching staff survey results 1. The skills support your students have received has enabled them to better progress in their studies 2. The additional support has had a positive impact on your students’ performance in their assessments 3. My students are better equipped at using academic sources of information in their assignments 4. My students have developed the necessary skills and knowledge to progress to their next level of study
  11. 11. Any questions? A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Information and Library Services
  12. 12. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Be inspired A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Information and Library Services
  13. 13. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m References: Hoffman, N., Beatty, S., Feng, P., & Lee, J. (2017). Teaching research skills through embedded librarianship. Reference Services Review, 45(2), 211–226. Available at https://doi.org/10.1108/RSR-07-2016-0045 Mc Williams, R. and Allan, Q., (2014) Embedding Academic Literacy Skills: Towards a Best Practice Model, in Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, Vol 11, Issue 3, Article 8. Available at http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol11/iss3/8 Schulte, S. J. (2012). Embedded academic librarianship: A Review of the Literature. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice. https://doi.org/10.18438/B8M60D Wingate, U. (2006) ‘Doing away with ‘study skills’’, Teaching in Higher Education, 11(4), pp. 457-469.
  14. 14. A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Te a m Information and Library Services Contact Sharon Perera Academic Support Team Manager University of Greenwich S.R.Perera@gre.ac.uk Rachael Hartiss Academic Services Librarian University of Greenwich R.Hartiss@greenwich.ac.uk Andrew Sinclair Academic Skills Tutor University of Greenwich A.Sinclair@gre.ac.uk

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