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Developing your teaching philosophy - Corrall & Folk

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Presented at LILAC 2018

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Developing your teaching philosophy - Corrall & Folk

  1. 1. Developing Your Teaching Philosophy Sheila Corrall, Professor University of Pi;sburgh scorrall@pi;.edu Amanda Folk, Head of Teaching and Learning Ohio State University Libraries, folk.68@osu.edu
  2. 2. “A teaching philosophy statement is a concise, compelling illustraJon of you as an instructor, a useful reflexive examinaJon of your teaching, and a necessary component of many academic job applicaJons” (University Center for Teaching & Learning, 2017) What Is a Statement of Teaching Philosophy?
  3. 3. Moving your teaching from a task to a process Scope & Purpose A Teaching Philosophy aims to capture and communicate: •  your beliefs about teaching and learning, how learning occurs, and how a teacher can facilitate or intervene in the process; •  your assumpJons about the purpose and value of educaJon, and the kinds of goals and objecJves you have for students; •  your preferences for behaving and interacJng with learners, and the sorts of relaJonships you like to develop with them; •  the forms of educaJon and instrucJon, types of acJviJes and assignments, and methods of assessment and evaluaJon you use in pracJce. It can support applicaJons for jobs, promoJon, grants, and awards and facilitate your reflecJve professional development
  4. 4. How would you describe your approach as a teacher? Why do you teach the way you do? Who influenced your teaching or inspired your learning? Where do you focus your teaching efforts? What will learners gain from working with you? Process & Content •  Developed through individual reflecJon, but o^en with peer support •  Usually intended for a wider audience •  Wri;en in the first person, typically 1-2 pages long •  Should explain the context of your work and include personal examples/refs.
  5. 5. Steps Towards A Teaching Philosophy •  Who or what has influenced, informed or inspired your approach to teaching and supporJng learning? •  How can a teacher facilitate or intervene in the learning process to help learning occur? •  What objecJves and goals do you have for students as learners in your subject and generally? •  How do you see your relaJonship with the learners you work and interact with? •  What methods do you use to support and assess learning and evaluate your teaching? •  What metaphor could you use to describe your teaching role to someone outside the field?
  6. 6. LILAC Teaching Philosophy U Model Influences Metaphors Beliefs Prac5ces Goals Styles Who? How? How? What? How? What? How? What? Who? How? Why? Why? Why? Why? Why? Adapted from Strategic Learning U Model (Cunningham, 1999, p. 146)
  7. 7. LILAC Teaching Philosophy U Model Influences Metaphors Beliefs Prac5ces Goals Styles Who? How? How? What? How? What? How? What? Who? How? Why? Why? Why? Why? Why? G E N E R A L T I M E B O U N D Adapted from Strategic Learning U Model (Cunningham, 1999, p. 146) THINKING DOING Espoused theory Theory in use
  8. 8. Influences on Approaches to Teaching Who or what has influenced, informed or inspired your approach to teaching and learning? My approach to teaching has been influenced by… Ø  Ian Cunningham (self-managed learning) Ø  David Kolb (experienJal learning and educaJon) Ø  CILASS & Angela Brew (inquiry-based learning) Ø  John Biggs (construcJve alignment) Ø  Wiggins & McTighe (backward design) Ø  TOP/Vai & Sosulski (reflecJve online discussion) Ø  Mary-Ann Winkelmes (transparency in teaching)
  9. 9. Beliefs about Learning and Teaching How can a teacher facilitate or intervene in the learning process to help learning occur? For me, learning occurs best when it… starts with a learner’s personal experience, integrates new concepts into exisJng mental models, is situated in the real world, and supported by explicit standards, conJnual pracJce, low-stakes assignments, and conJnuous construc5ve feedback “Do you have any academic library experience?”
  10. 10. ObjecJves and Goals for Learners What goals do you have for students as learners in your specific subject and more generally? As a result of working with me, my students… acquire knowledge of libraries in higher ed, develop skills in criJcal analysis, synthesis, and evaluaJon, and the abiliJes needed… to become flexible, creaJve, reflecJve, self-aware, socially-sensiJve independent collaboraJve interdisciplinary evidence- based pracJJoner-researchers, teachers and lifelong learners with global perspecJve
  11. 11. Styles of Teaching or Learning FacilitaJon How do you see your relaJonship with the learners you work with and interact with? As a teacher, I prefer to be… an authoritaJve source of experJse, who facilitates learning by idenJfying, selecJng and organizing the best possible resources for learners; explaining and demonstraJng key concepts/terms and core competencies; and offering individual advice and feedback. “From sage on the stage to guide on the side”
  12. 12. Teaching and Learning Support PracJces What methods do you use to support and assess learning? How do you evaluate your teaching? Methods I oFen use include… •  readings (required and recommended) •  discussions (aligned to learning objecJves) •  lectures (pre-recorded with transcripts) •  assignments (scaffolded field projects) •  student opinion of teaching surveys •  group/personal communicaJon (emails) •  end-of-term/annual reflecJons on teaching
  13. 13. Metaphors and Similes of Teaching What metaphor could you use to describe your teaching role to someone outside the field? A teacher is like a… •  Counsellor •  Parent •  Coach •  Friend •  Advocate •  Entertainer (Marchant, 1992) •  Role model •  Leader •  MoJvator •  Mentor •  Babysi;er •  ArJst Librarian!
  14. 14. References Biggs, J., & Tang, C. (2011). Teaching for quality learning at university: What the student does (4th ed.). SRHE & Open University Press. Brew, A. (2012). Teaching and research: New relaJonships and their implicaJons for inquiry-based teaching and learning in higher educaJon. Higher EducaMon Research and Development, 31(1), 101-114. Cunningham, I. (1999). The wisdom of strategic learning: The self-managed learning soluMon (2nd ed.). Gower. Kolb, A. Y. et al. (2014). On becoming an experienJal educator: The educator role profile. SimulaMon & Gaming, 45(2), 204-234. Kolb, D. A. (1976). Management and the learning process. California Management Review, 18(3), 21-31. Marchant, G. J. (1992). A teacher is like a…: Using simile lists to explore personal metaphors. Language and EducaMon, 6(1), 33-45. Vai, M., & Sosulski, K. (2016). EssenMals of online course design: A standards- based guide (2nd ed). Routledge. Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). AssociaJon for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Winkelmes, M. A et al. (2015). Benefits (some unexpected) of transparently designed assignments. NaMonal Teaching & Learning Forum, 24(4), 4-7.

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