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Developing a framework to improve information literacy in an entry to practice paramedicine program - Barr

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Presented at LILAC 2018

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Developing a framework to improve information literacy in an entry to practice paramedicine program - Barr

  1. 1. Embedding information literacy education in an entry to practice program Dr Nigel Barr
  2. 2. Acknowledgements • CSALT – USC Learning and Teaching Grant Scheme • Reference group • Student life and learning – Margot Reeh • Librarian – Roger Carter • C-SALT – Theresa Ashford • NAPA – in kind support 2
  3. 3. Who am I & where is USC? 3 Smart Steps Case based simulation Evidence based practice
  4. 4. Why the fuss over IL? 4 Changing student intake • the suite of competencies and attributes of students entering university has changed over the last 2 decades Research • universities in Australia are not successfully equipping their graduates with information literacy skills to enable life- long learning. Changing teaching practice • How do we teach our students to move beyond reproducing current thinking to critical thinking?
  5. 5. Ambulance and Paramedic Industry Skills Forecast Industry Reference Committee; 2018 • Certificate II to diploma • VET sector • Bachelor  PhD • Tertiary sector • National registration for paramedics in Australia begins 2018 • Degree now baseline qualification for paramedics 5
  6. 6. The IRC ranked 12 generic skills 1 • Information literacy 2 • Communication 3 • Leadership… 6
  7. 7. The project Literature review External Data Collection Network of Australian Paramedic Academics Internal Data Collection USC Bachelor of Paramedic Science 7
  8. 8. NAPA study What did our external partners SAY? 8
  9. 9. We asked NAPA participants (n=29) to define what Information Literacy meant to them... Theme % of comments Skill level Find / collect 84.6 Lower Critique / evaluate 53.8 Higher Integrate 38.5 Higher Understand 38.5 Lower Identify knowledge required 34.6 Higher Communicate 19.2 Higher Manage data 3.8 Lower 9
  10. 10. The benefits of developing Information Literacy skills in Paramedics Students who develop information literacy skills Generally agree (%) can engage in independent learning through constructing new meaning, understanding and knowledge. 94.7 can search for and use information for decision making and problem solve. 94.7 can demonstrate social responsibility through a commitment to lifelong learning and community participation. 73.7 derive satisfaction from using information wisely. 68.4 10
  11. 11. “Standard” . “Element” . “Learning Objective” Standard 1. Recognises the need for information and determines the nature and extent of the information needed Importance Point in program 1.1.1 Explores general information sources to increase familiarity with the topic High Early 1.1.4 Identifies key concepts and terms in order to formulate the focus questions High nc 1.2.1 Understands how information is organised and disseminated High Early 11 Points of consensus
  12. 12. Points of consensus 1. Recognises the need for information and determines the nature and extent of the information needed 1.1 Defines and articulates the information needed Activities/context: Explore information sources, identify key concepts and terms 1.2 Understands the purpose, scope and appropriateness of a variety of information sources Activities/context: Topic context is discipline bound; differentiates between a variety of information sources; identifies primary and secondary information sources 12
  13. 13. Student survey USC Internal data 13
  14. 14. Making sense of student understandings of Information Literacy: Sources of information students use for assignments • Peer Reviewed Journal 97.3 • Textbooks 82.0 • Government reports 64.9 • Online reference 60.4 • Collaborative Encyclopaedia 12.6 • News Media 2.7 • No statistically significant changes across the years 14
  15. 15. • Use of diverse resources to develop assignments increased with year in program: Entry year 24.3% final year 65.0% • HOWEVER - no associations were found for year in program regarding: • checking whether a concept is still current while developing an answer for an assignment. • use a systematic process to help judge the relevance of the information. • use of bibliographic software to manage collected information. 15 Making sense of student understandings of Information Literacy:
  16. 16. • Associations were found for year in program • Use of multiple sources to reach a conclusion • Early year 10.8% Final year 60% • Use the USC style guide to ensure accuracy in citations • Early year 9.4% Final year 20% • No associations were found for year in program - • Working out how to explain a new idea effectively • Synthesis - setting out the main ideas from each source and then combine them to generate new knowledge for an assignment • Use and understanding of statistical/research data 16 Making sense of student understandings of Information Literacy:
  17. 17. The ‘big easy’ a solution or strategy that can be implemented using your current resources and network. 17
  18. 18. Our Big Easy Our solution was based on developing tools to help recognise and map how our program would support the development of a student’s ability to recognise, find, critique and synthesise 18
  19. 19. Solution 1 Critical alignment within a program, informed by the data collected externally and internally Vertical integration decision tool Horizontal integration map 19 IL Standards Standard 1 Year 1 outcome Year 1 Course 1 Element outcomes Activities Assessment Year 1 Course 2 Element outcomes Activities Assessment IL Standard USC standard Program standard defined by CAUL defined by university defined by program Year 1 Standards Assessment Target courses Year 2 Standards Assessment Target courses Year 3 Standards Assessment Target courses
  20. 20. 20 Standards and elements Year standard Scaffolds 1. Recognises the need for information and determines the nature and extent of the information needed Year 1 - With direction the student interprets the nature and extent of information the task requires. Teacher led deconstruction of task requirements Year 2 - To work with minimal direction to interpret the nature and extent of information the task requires. Student led deconstruction of task requirements Year 3 - To work independently to interpret the nature and extent of information the task requires. Independent deconstruction of task requirements. 2. Finds needed information effectively and efficiently Year 1 - With direction find information required to answer a task using an appropriate search strategy Teacher led session to develop the skills necessary to use multiple strategies to find information Year 2 - To work with minimal direction to find the information the task requires. Student led session to develop effective strategies to find information required. Year 3 Independently finds needed information using a structured approach Independently uses appropriate search tools to efficiently find required information. 3. Critically evaluates information and the information seeking process Year 1 - With direction evaluates the relevance of information. Teacher led session on assessing the usefulness and relevance of the information. Year 2 - Identifies themes within the information and constructs a logical argument. Student led session on defining and applying criteria for evaluating the information. Year 3 - Critically explores themes and critiques the evidence discovered Student led session on critical evaluation of information.
  21. 21. Solution 2 A structure informed by the literature review and USC resources 21 Working Party (me) Program reference group Course coordinator Program coordinator Academic developers
  22. 22. Solution 3 Develop a scientific communication rubric for the program that shows increasing complexity of the pass mark across consecutive years. Criteria & Weight Year 3 pass (Developing) Year 2 pass (Developing) Year 1 pass (Developing) Year 1 fail (inadequate) Formation of an argument Content / Scientific Merit The assessment piece should be well-researched, drawing on a suitable range of quality sources of information to answer the question posed Sound theoretical base with all material wisely selected Sound theoretical base with no irrelevant material included. Theoretical base mostly relevant. Inadequate theoretical base with mostly irrelevant or low-quality material included. Analysis The assessment piece should show evidence of exploration of important themes identified in the scientific literature Themes developed in a balanced way; developing logical relationships and internal consistency; Logical relationships are indicated; consistent internally. Themes are described without being connected; internal inconsistencies are present. lack of breadth in identified themes, absence of logical relationships or many internal inconsistencies Synthesis The assessment piece should show evidence of critiquing the scientific evidence and weaving together of ideas to support a logical argument. All arguments are fully and clearly supported by evidence based on research which is presented showing comparisons and synthesis. Most arguments are generally supported by appropriate research-based evidence with some synthesis of the evidence cited. Some arguments are supported by evidence however there is infrequent critical analysis of evidence from sources used. Little, if any of the evidence cited supports the arguments or evidence from sources is treated uncritically. 22
  23. 23. Solution 3 Develop a scientific communication rubric for the program that shows increasing complexity of the pass mark across consecutive years. Criteria & Weight Year 3 pass (Developing) Year 2 pass (Developing) Year 1 pass (Developing) Year 1 fail (inadequate) Presentation of the argument Structure The assessment should be structured to meet the specifications contained in the task information. Elegant and imaginative presentation Structure appropriate to assignment task. Some inconsistencies in style; adequate statement of intention appropriate layout. Appropriate introduction with clear statement of intention; well-structured overall with appropriate conclusion; Structure and style Badly designed; Grammatical Conventions Your work should be well- presented in a style that meets the prescribed criteria or contemporary conventions All presentation criteria met with no spelling, syntax or grammatical errors. All presentation criteria met but with a more than five spelling, syntax or grammatical errors. Appropriate style that was consistent with the task Inappropriate style that was inconsistent with the task. Referencing and citations Your work is original and the sources of ideas are acknowledged where appropriate and citations reflect the prescribed style guide Consistent and complete Vancouver style referencing techniques with a few errors Consistent and complete Vancouver style referencing techniques with moderate number of citation errors There are inconsistencies in the Vancouver style referencing technique. In adequate referencing style and technique. 23
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