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Catapulted by Covid-19 : hitting new information literacy targets at the University of Edinburgh - Christine Love-Rodgers & Sarah Louise McDonald

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Catapulted by Covid-19 : hitting
new information literacy targets at
the University of Edinburgh
Christine Love-Rodgers
Sa...

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Session outline
 Background
 The modules
 LibSmart I
 Results
 LibSmart II
 Communications
 Evaluation
 Lessons le...

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Background : University of Edinburgh
45,615 students (2020/21)
• 26,850 UG
• 12,920 PGT
• 5,485 PGR
11 Library sites acros...

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Catapulted by Covid-19 : hitting new information literacy targets at the University of Edinburgh - Christine Love-Rodgers & Sarah Louise McDonald

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Presented at LILAC 2022

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Catapulted by Covid-19 : hitting new information literacy targets at the University of Edinburgh - Christine Love-Rodgers & Sarah Louise McDonald

  1. 1. Catapulted by Covid-19 : hitting new information literacy targets at the University of Edinburgh Christine Love-Rodgers SarahLouise McDonald Library Academic Support Team University of Edinburgh Library Academic Support Helping you get the best from the Library, its collections, resources and services
  2. 2. Session outline  Background  The modules  LibSmart I  Results  LibSmart II  Communications  Evaluation  Lessons learned  Next steps for LibSmart
  3. 3. Background : University of Edinburgh 45,615 students (2020/21) • 26,850 UG • 12,920 PGT • 5,485 PGR 11 Library sites across Edinburgh College Student numbers Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences 26,130 Science & Engineering 11,745 Medicine & Veterinary Medicine 7740
  4. 4. Background : Meet the ASL Team • 13 Academic Support Librarians (ASLs) • 3 College focused teams • Work across the team to support generic skills and induction Institute for Academic Development (IAD) Digital Skills Team Student Induction Team Schools and Colleges Library Academic Support Team ‘Library’ Study Skills support at the University of Edinburgh
  5. 5. Background: Our information literacy framework • Developed 2019-2020 • Drew on existing frameworks : • ACRL Information Literacy framework • JISC Digital Capabilities Framework • Vitae Researcher Development Framework • National Information Literacy Framework (Scotland) • CILIP Model for Information Literacy • Mapped our existing teaching • Practical working tool
  6. 6. Background : Journey to online Pre 2020 • Online information literacy course in partnership with IAD was discontinued due to low take-up • In semester 1 (Aug-Dec) 2019, less than 6% of ASL synchronous teaching was online 2020 • COVID pivot to online teaching • Information literacy course appears in College of Arts, Humanities & Social Science Information Strategy Image: Tardis Tour Wales 2013 Rept0n1x, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
  7. 7. • LibSmart I aims to help all students develop the core digital skills needed to use online library resources for study and research • Covers five foundation topics in a generic approach: • Starting to use the library • Your information landscape • Finding and retrieval • Managing information • Referencing and avoiding plagiarism Teaching support in 2020 • Discussion board support with student ambassadors week -1 to week 4 • ‘Ask us about using the Library’ live sessions in week 1 https://www.ed.ac.uk/is/LibSmart
  8. 8. LibSmart I Design principles • SCQF Level 7 • Digital First • Equitable access • Library lens for digital skills • MOOC-like structure • Shared content with live delivery Student Induction team sessions LibSmart I Context • First delivered September 2020 when all students were studying online • Project supported by funding for student transition to online learning • Part of a suite of short transition courses including academic writing, English language skills https://www.ed.ac.uk/is/LibSmart
  9. 9. Results: LibSmart I 2020-2021 • 711 total enrolments • 422 UG students registered. This is about 5% of all new undergraduate students • 70% of students from College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. • 253 PGT students and 31 PGR students across disciplines Image: Classic pose with a magnifying glass Stephencdickson, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
  10. 10. • LibSmart II is aimed at undergraduate honours and postgraduate students to help them build the individual library landscape they need to undertake dissertation, thesis or project research. • Launched in September 2021. • Flexible, ‘pick and mix’ approach - choose from ten modules to: • Develop knowledge of a wide range of digital resources • Learn specialised or advanced digital search techniques • Develop the skills to manage research literature and data effectively. https://www.ed.ac.uk/is/LibSmart
  11. 11. LibSmart II Needs Analysis Survey • Responses primarily from CAHSS • Gaps in provision : • search skills to enable a wider range of searching • search techniques • Highest level of interest in: • Using archives for research and study • Digital Images • Developing search strategies for systematic review “It is always challenging … to encourage student engagement with non-compulsory academic activities. Part of the challenge is the perennial one of communication: [...] students feel bombarded with this sort of information and don’t always engage with it. Students also perceive that their honours courses demand much more preparation than they’re used to, leaving less time for additional skills activities. Making LibSmart II as flexible as possible would be a good idea.” Academic staff feedback https://www.ed.ac.uk/is/LibSmart
  12. 12. LibSmart II design principles • SCQF level 10 • Supporting dissertation research • Supporting interdisciplinary study • Supporting student choice and subject specialism • A holistic library experience • Digital badges
  13. 13. Systematic Reviews • Develop a good understanding of the principal theories, concepts and principles for literature searching for systematic reviews • Be able to apply specialised and advanced skills and techniques for literature searching for systematic reviews Health Literature • Be aware of the range of sources of health literature available from the Library and how to access them • Use a range of tools and techniques to develop library research skills for health related topics. Image: Lothian Health Services Archives, Centre for Research Collections
  14. 14. Data mindfulness • Recognize the importance of research data management & apply basic RDM skills • Demonstrate knowledge of relevant data management tools and resources • Find and access secondary data sources appropriate to their subject / discipline / research topic • Demonstrate & apply knowledge of the range of digital news sources available from the Library to identify the most appropriate for language acquisition or a research topic. • Apply search techniques and skills to conduct an effective search across online news information. Digital news sources Daily Mirror. Image : UK Press Online.
  15. 15. Legal information • Demonstrate an understanding of the legal information landscape • Locate and use legal materials in library collections and beyond • Apply knowledge and understanding of legal information to support research in any subject area. Law Library, University of Edinburgh. Scottish Parliament Debating Chamber. Image : Colin, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons • Be aware of the range of government and policy information sources available from the Library and how to access them • Use a range of tools and techniques to develop library research skills in government and policy information. Government and policy research
  16. 16. Business Information • Demonstrate knowledge of the lifecycle of business information and how this affects the method of enquiry • Demonstrate understanding of the range of business information sources available and how to access them • Use a range of ICT applications to support library research Stock Trading Monitor. Image by Lorenzo Cafaro from Pixabay Digital primary sources and digital scholarship • Demonstrate knowledge of the range of digital primary sources from the Library and how to access them • Use advanced and specialised skills to search effectively for Digital primary sources • Be introduced to skills, techniques, practices and/or materials in digital scholarship.
  17. 17. Digital Images • Demonstrate knowledge of the range of image sources from the Library and beyond • Use specialist or advanced search techniques to find images • Use ICT applications to handle and reuse images, and demonstrate awareness of copyright restrictions Nathan Coley, ‘The Basic Material is…’. Main Library, University of Edinburgh. © University of Edinburgh Art Collections Image: Halliwell-Phillipps Collection, CRC • Demonstrate knowledge of what special collections are and how to navigate them. • Apply knowledge, skills and understanding of special collections research including copyright and data protection. • Critically review information gained from searches in order to identify gaps in research materials Special Collections Fundamentals
  18. 18. Digital Primary Sources and Digital Scholarship Special Collections Fundamentals Digital images Data Mindfulness Systematic Reviews Health Information Government and Policy research Legal Information Business Information Finding and using digital news sources Getting Started with the Library Your information landscape Finding and retrieval Managing information Referencing and plagiarism Old books on shelves in the Main Library, George Square. Image: University of Edinburgh
  19. 19. Communications Plan • Academic audiences • Committees • Newsletters • Video • Student audiences • Peer to peer social media • Plasma screens • Video • New student app • Professional Services audiences • Video • EdHelp
  20. 20. LibSmart is an online, self-enrol Learn course developed with the aim of ensuring that every student is digitally capable in using online library resources for their study and research. We've created LibSmart I to help you get started using library resources. The course provides an introduction to topics such as: LibSmart II focuses on the next steps for your research, allowing you to pick the modules you find most relevant for your work. You’ll develop advanced searching skills and really get to grips with subject specific information. This course will help you with complex research projects such as dissertations, systematic reviews or final year projects. • accessing and using online library resources • exploring library collections • finding and managing information • using tools to help you with citation and referencing. Visit www.ed.ac.uk/is/libsmart to find out more!
  21. 21. Evaluation: Student feedback • Feedback from student reviewers in build phases • Feedback from student ambassadors supporting course • Regular annual feedback from student intern reviewers • Online evaluation survey • Low response rate • All positive • Chiefly from PG students “This has been very useful! I didn’t know about some of the functions like adding items to my favourites list or connecting google scholar to findit@edinburgh! I will definitely use these myself from now on.” LibSmart I student “Watching the video for this section, I had no idea you could export your reading list as a bibliography! That's so useful, and it'll save me a lot of time in the future!” LibSmart I student
  22. 22. Evaluation: Staff feedback • Feedback from staff reviewers in build phase • Feedback from Library committee at senior committee level during reporting • Feedback from rollout to Schools in practical teaching sessions “I am going to send out an email to our Directors of… IFP, Access, Open Studies and Digital Education suggesting that we request to have LibSmart automatically added to those students on the various programmes we deliver within [the Centre for Open Learning], as I think this would be a useful addition in supporting them during their studies.” Email comment from Head of Arts, Centre for Open Learning
  23. 23. How are Schools using LibSmart as part of teaching? 1. Links in induction information 2. Links on School Sharepoint site 3. Link in School’s research skills programme information 4. Link in course website 5. Students asked to complete material as part of ‘flipped classroom’ teaching
  24. 24. Encouraging engagement: Users Image by wal_172619, via Pixabay Academic staff • Consultation during planning • Inclusion in design process • Option to review content • Personalised promotion • Make it easy! Professional Services staff • Opportunity for collaboration • Piggyback on existing projects • Clear expectations • Credit where it’s due • Top Ten Tips to promote Students • Include in inductions • Regular promotion on social media, blogs: infographics! • Semester long plan, adjust for subsequent terms • Digital badges. (See Pothier, 2020)
  25. 25. Encouraging engagement: Digital Badges We launched Digital Badges as part of the LibSmart I relaunch/LibSmart II launch in September 2021. The badges were designed by our Digital Engagement student intern during the six month content development period. We use Badgr, a third party site, to host and issue badges to students’ “digital backpacks”. Pros: • Incentivised non-credit bearing course: the Pokémon effect! • Not widely used at UoE– good test case for future badge projects • Supported by Learning Technologists who designed structure of process Cons: • Platforms do not integrate how we would like them to, so process is manual • Time consuming • Potential for human error
  26. 26. Results: LibSmart II 2022-2023 (21 March) • 588 total enrolments across 27 academic disciplines • 396 (67%) PGT + 69 12% PGR = 79% PG across disciplines • 123 (21%) UG across all disciplines • 53% distance learning students • 58% CMVM (Medicine)
  27. 27. Results: LibSmart II 2022-2023 (21 March) • 65 badges awarded • Top 5 courses for badge awards 1. Data Mindfulness: Your Dissertation Data 2. Health Literature 3. Digital Images 4. Special Collections Fundamentals 5. Government and Policy Research
  28. 28. Lessons Learned: Triumphs • Wide scope of project – involved many departments • Communications plan for promotion • Reporting in different formats: • 1-page executive summaries • Papers taken to Library Committee • Summaries to interested parties for discussions on future development • Staff development tool Image by StockSnap on Pixabay
  29. 29. Lessons Learned: Challenges • Course communications • Student engagement with a non credit bearing course • Self-enrol course • LibSmart II more complex to ‘sell’ • Teaching Support – LibSmart I 2020/21 vs 2021/22 • Digital badges: tech fails! Image by stevepb on Pixabay
  30. 30. Next Steps: LibSmart + • Built on positive feedback from students on Widening Participation programmes • Board approval to run as a Centre for Open Learning Short course in 2022/23 • Credit bearing • Run in parallel with other COL courses • Provides enhanced discussion board / tutor support • Taught and assessed by ASLs
  31. 31. Next steps: University of Edinburgh Curriculum Transformation Programme • Focus on: • Student skills • Transition points • Interdisciplinarity • Seat at the table in ‘Ready for HE’ working group • At the time of writing : input to strategic consultation paper
  32. 32. Next steps: LibSmart Content Review • LibSmart I • LibSmart II Further modules? • Chemistry • Data literacy • Wikimedia
  33. 33. Conclusions • COVID-19 enabled the creation of a new online information literacy course, LibSmart I • Over 1200 students have benefited from the 2 new courses we delivered at speed • Student engagement was most successful when academic staff enrolled class cohorts as part of course teaching • Course delivered a unique Edinburgh experience • Created new and lasting links within curriculum landscape at the University of Edinburgh
  34. 34. Bibliography Burkholder, Joel. (2019) “Manufacturing a context : rhetorical implications of standalone critical information literacy courses.” In : Pashia, A. & Critten, J., 2019. Critical approaches to credit-bearing information literacy courses, Chicago, IL: Association of College & Research Libraries Howson, C. (2014) ‘Feedback to and from Students : building an ethos of student and staff engagement in teaching and learning’ In. Fry, Heather, et al. (2014) A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education : Enhancing Academic Practice, London: Routledge. Wendy Pothier. (2020) Information Literacy Instruction and Online Learning: Making the Case for Incorporating Digital Badges. Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning 14:3-4, pages 266-277.
  35. 35. Thank you The Library Academic SupportTeam http://www.ed.ac.uk/is/ASL
  36. 36. Christine Love-Rodgers Academic Support Librarian, College Lead CAHSS University of Edinburgh Email: Christine.Love- Rodgers@ed.ac.uk Twitter: @cloverodgers SarahLouise McDonald Academic Support Librarian University of Edinburgh Email: sarahlouise.mcdonald@ed.ac.uk Twitter: @brawbukes

Editor's Notes

  • University of Edinburgh
    13 Academic Support Librarians in 3 College focused teams.
    Bespoke sessions to Schools
    Generic sessions in partnership with University Central Services providers : includes induction sessions, literature searching sessions, bibliographic / reference management software
    Uniquely : provide 1:2:1 appointments for literature searching and reference management software support
    Work in a matrix of study skills delivery which has multiple stakeholders
  • Developed 2019-2020 by Dr Lauren Smith
    The Information Literacy Framework fits within the Digital Skills Framework (used by UoE Digital Skills team), adding structure to a section of the Information, Data and Media literacies element of Digital Capability
    Drew on existing frameworks :
    ACRL Information Literacy framework
    Jisc Digital Capabilities Framework
    Vitae Researcher Development Framework
    National Information Literacy Framework (Scotland)
    CILIP Model for Information Literacy
    Mapped our existing teaching
    Practical working tool – which informed development of our online teaching – underpinned LibSmart I
  • Tardis – time travelling. Online courses – we’d been there before. But pre 2020- no institutional momentum for online information literacy delivery. Except for professional subject areas – Law and Medicine – delivering online programmes.
    Pivot to online delivery – in sem 1 2019 only 6% of delivery was online
    In Sem 1 2020 it was 100%
  • LibSmart I was launched in September 2020. It’s an online self-enrol course available via Learn. It covers the foundation information literacy skills that will take a student step by step from starting to use the library to researching a topic for their academic work. Students learn how to locate the reading for their course and use e-books and e-journals. Then they are supported to develop good academic practice, including how to construct a search strategy, manage the information they’ve found, and use library tools for citing and referencing. 
  • LibSmart I Design principles
    SCQF Level 7 – transition from school to university
    Digital First – focus on online, info about borrowing books, using campus libraries is an add-on
    Equitable access – focused on library tools all students would use – DiscoverEd, LibGuides, Leganto. Avoided subject focused databases. Aiming to deliver a baseline set of information literacy skills to all students/
    Library lens for digital skills – reference management, citation using DiscoverEd/Leganto. Focus on use of library tools for these digital skills.
    MOOC-like structure – 5 week course, 3 hours of learning content
    Shared content with live delivery - Student Induction team sessions. LibSmart materials were the ‘golden copy’ which were adapted to provide live delivery presentations as part of our student induction team programme. So students had a choice of synchronous or asynchronous delivery


    LibSmart I Context
    Develivered September 2020 when all students were studying online
    Project supported by funding for student transition to online learning
    Part of a suite of short transition courses including academic writing, English language skills


  • PG figures were surprising as we’d designed this as an entry level UG/foundation course. It wasn’t promoted to PG students but they engaged and provided positive feedback. This was encouraging for the next level of LibSmart.

    These figures allowed us to benchmark what would be reasonable and aspirational goals for engagement for LibSmart II during the planning phase.
    Data from CAHSS LISC paper Oct 21 https://uoe.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/sites/ASLsKeepinginTouch/Shared%20Documents/LibraryAcademicSupport/Information%20Skills/LibSmart_Online%20Information%20Literacy%20course/LibSmart%20Reports/CAHSS%20LISC_LibSmartOct21.docx?d=wf08fedfd8dc442f99bc693043609eab9&csf=1&web=1&e=5zReu3
  • LibSmart II will be launched in September 2021. It is aimed at undergraduate honours and postgraduate students to help them build the individual library landscape they need to undertake dissertation, thesis or project research.  Students can pick and mix from ten subject specific and specialised modules. Let’s have a look at them.
  • The survey was conducted between November 2020 and January 2021, and asked respondents to
    answer a number of questions about the current information literacy provision in their school. The
    survey was either sent out directly or responses from conversations with the Academic Support Librarian team
    were recorded. The data w as compiled in February 2021 and this summary written in March.
    Survey scope
    We received 18 responses from 12 schools, meaning 12 schools did not respond to the survey invitation or have a discussion with their ASL. The vast majority of responses came from CAHSS
    schools, with only the School of Engineering and Physics responding from CSE and no responses from CMVM. This is to be expected as CAHSS has the largest number of ASLs of the three colleges, and the CAHSS ASL team had been focusing on information literacy in their schools for some time.

    Largest number of responses to survey from CAHSS Schools

    Current information literacy training is provided equally by academic support librarians and
    academic staff

    Current provision focuses
    on using library catalogues and databases

    Gaps in provision are search skills to enable a wider range of searching, and advanced search
    techniques.

    Highest level of interest in modules:
    Using archives for research and study
    (10),
    Finding and
    using image r
    esources for research and study
    (9)
    Developing search strategies for systematic
    review

    Lowest level of interest :
    Finding and using financial and business information for research
    and study (0), Using health information for research and study (2), Using le
    gal information
    for research and study (2), and Finding and using information resources for government and
    policy research (3)

    Six respondents mentioned they would have been interested in more than three of the listed
    modules

    13/18 respondents agreed or mentioned a colleague or department contact who would be
    happy to be involved further with LibSmart

    Ten additional comments were positive and indicated enthusiasm for the LibSmart project
  • SCQF level 10 – aimed at students transitioning into years 3 and 4 Honours level study
    Supporting dissertation research – encouraging independent and creative dissertation research
    Supporting interdisciplinary study – we wanted engineering students to use digital images, History students to use Scots law, Social Policy students to use medical literature
    Supporting student choice and subject specialism. Flexibility was key – never expected students to do all 10 modules. Instead : envisioned max of 3.
    A holistic library experience – wanted students to engage with resources and services provided by all library teams – data, Special Collections as well as primary and secondary literature
    Digital badges to reward successful participation in modules
  • The Systematic Reviews module will help students understand what a systematic review is and when they should undertake one, as well as allow them to practice drafting search protocols and testing them for quality.

    Designed to help students who need to find literature  on  health-related  topics but who are not studying for clinical degrees, the Health literature module explores sources of health literature and how to search them. This includes the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Cinahl and the Lothian Health Services Archives at the Centre for Research Collections.
  • Data mindfulness : making the most of finding and managing data for your dissertation takes students on a step by step journey through the dissertation research process, focusing on understanding data, research design and managing and storing research data.

    In Finding and using digital news sources students can learn about using newspapers, news magazines, news wires, and broadcast news for research purposes. Both current and archive news sources are explored, and the course reflects on using news sources for language acquisition and learning about culture.
  • The Legal information module is an introduction to using legal information to support research in any subject areas. It uses case studies and step-by-step research activities as practical illustrations of the legal information landscape.
  • The Business information module introduces students to company and financial databases and sources for market research information and how to search them. Students can undertake a research activity to develop and practice their search techniques.

    In Digital primary sources and digital scholarship, students learn how to search the wide range of digital primary source databases covering over 500 years of world culture available from the University of Edinburgh Library, as well as open access sources. Students are introduced to library tools to help them develop skills and techniques in digital scholarship.
  • Students can use the Digital images module to discover digital images in library databases, open access sources and the University’s art, museum and library collections. There’s a detailed look at copyright, particularly in the context of artistic works, and practical tips on how to handle, download and reuse digital images.

    Special Collections Fundamentals aims to introduce students to what Special Collections are and how they might use them. As well as the practicalities of searching catalogues and visiting the reading room, the module covers the legal environment affecting Special Collections, including copyright and data protection.
  • LibSmart will give students the confidence they need to make the best use of online library resources for their studies. They will be able to earn digital badges to showcase their skills which they can add to their social media profiles or CVs. We recommend that students study modules from LibSmart II after completing LibSmart I.
  • LibSmart Communications Strategy 2021-22
    Communications Objectives
    • Position LibSmart as a fundamental component of academic skills development within Edinburgh’s hybrid teaching environment
    • Support Schools to use LibSmart to enable students to gain information literacy skills within and alongside course teaching
    • Raise awareness of support available from the Library Academic Support Team for Schools to use LibSmart effectively.

    Academic audiences
    Committees
    Newsletters
    Video
    Student audiences
    Peer to peer social media
    Plasma screens
    Video
    New student app
    Professional Services audiences
    Video
    EdHelp
  • Graphics developed by our LibSmart intern.
    She was given the brief and was involved in all project meetings from joining the team, then was given training and time to develop a number of graphics options for us.
    Options were brought back to the project team and wider ASL team for discussion, and top ideas were developed further into the LibSmart brand that we currently use. 
  • We created a number of standard slides that could be added into any presentation to introduce LibSmart to staff and students as part of our communications package. We also offered one-page summaries that could be used as top-line introductions for senior mangers, and made short videos, social media content, and plasma screen displays which all built from these basics and themes. 
  • Feedback from student reviewers in build phase
    Regular annual feedback from student intern reviewers – provided a lot of rich, detailed feedback
    Online evaluation survey
    Low response rate
    All positive
    Chiefly from PG students
  • Feedback from staff at all stages of development, including senior management at committee level.
    Buy-in from staff who’ve witnessed the resources being used and demonstrated by ASL colleagues in a live session with students.
  • Survey of Schools via academic support librarians – Nov 2021
    Most Schools
    • Link given in induction information
    Some Schools
    • Link on School sharepoint site
    • Academic staff have directed students to use LibSmart as part of their course teaching
    • Link included as part of School's research skills programme
    Few Schools
    • Students asked to complete LibSmart material as part of 'flipped classroom' ASL information literacy teaching
    • All students in a course cohort have been enrolled on LibSmart by course organiser
    2.1 Other ways that Schools are using LibSmart as part of teaching
    • Links on some Learn course pages- mainly Scottish Legal System and Advanced Legal writing courses.
    • Added to the Learn course for the P&IR 3rd year course Research Design in Politics and International Relations
    • Information and links to LibSmart have been included on the History Dissertation Learn site for UG students.
    • Several MHSES COs have contacted to ask if they could add LibSmart links to course pages in LEARN.
  • Different approaches were required for each group we were trying to engage with.​
    Academic staff:​
    Involved through whole process, from the idea for each module right through to asking for their consultation and then assistance with reviewing the final product. ​
    Made sure to give them everything they needed to promote to their students, suggestions of how the content might fit in with their curriculum, provided slides and blurbs for them to send out. ​
    Professional Services staff:​
    Promote internally – sometimes our departments don’t speak to each other enough to understand what’s going on.​
    Used avenues already existent – like the Knowledge Base for our EdHelp and Helpdesk teams. ​
    Make sure to be clear about what was expected from their involvement to respect their workload, and credit any resources or content which we borrowed.​
    Internally we wrote ‘ten top tips’ and linked to our sharepoint page, which has been popular with our own team.​
    Students​
    Really important to have student input, either through feedback forms or by volunteers/student interns. ​We had some paid student interns as part of transitions team review material, as well as our own student intern.
    Helped us see where the gaps were and talked even informally about how they like to receive info.
    Pothier article demonstrates badges as a tool for motivating students in a critical information skills environment.
  • Deanery of Biomedical Sciences, Deanery of Clinical Science – entire course cohorts were enrolled on LibSmart
    For CAHSS, top 3 Schools School of Social and Political Science, School of Health in Social Science, School of Law

  • Just over 10% badge participation / module completion
    No badge available for Systematic Review course
  • Wide scope: allowed for collaboration across departments which went surprisingly smoothly. Colleagues from our own department were paired with those from others to ensure communication flowed. Investment from other departments meant they cross promote our other resources now!
    Communications plan for promotion: developed with project team, ASL team and with input from students. Used Padlet as a way to gather information on audiences and consider how best to reach them. Having a structure helped us be organised and timely in our comms.
    Reporting: Useful to understand the interests of each stakeholder group in order to prepare the material in the most efficient way.
    Staff development tool : LibSmart was received with enthusiasm as a staff development tool for Library staff. It now forms part of the induction programme for all Help Services staff, which was unexpected.
  • LibSmart II more complex to ‘sell’

    Communications : LibSmart I benefited from Sep 2020 communications programme to all students to support transition to online learning. In Sept 2021 onwards, LibSmart has been less visible. Remains a challenge to communicate to students benefits of doing LibSmart.
    Self-enrol course on online learning portal – students don’t self enrol
    LibSmart II more complex to ‘sell’ – variety and scale of content
    Teaching Support : For LibSmart I’s first presentation we provided discussion board support + workshop sessions. But level of live interaction was low and questions asked were often general “how to use the library” questions. For presentation in second academic year, we removed dedicated support and directed enquiries to central EdHelp library enquiry service which was more sustainable.
  • Built on positive feedback from students on Widening Participation programmes
    Board approval to run as a Centre for Open Learning Short course in 2022/23
    Credit bearing
    Run in parallel with other COL courses
    Provides enhanced discussion board / tutor support
    Taught and assessed by ASLs
  • Our ambition for Curriculum Transformation is to:

    Generate an outstanding educational experience for students
    Increase our impact in how teaching is administered and supported, and
    Create greater alignment with institutional strategic priorities.
    Focus on:
    Student skills
    Transition points
    Interdisciplinarity
    LibSmart is a fit with this

    Curriculum transformation ‘Ready for HE’ working group
    At the time of writing : waiting for strategic consultation paper. Discussing questions like automatic self enrolment.
  • Content Review
    LibSmart I
    LibSmart II


    Further modules?
    Chemistry
    Data literacy
    Wikimedia
  • COVID-19 enabled the creation of a new online information literacy course. LibSmart was catapulted by COVID – project gained traction and publicity on the back of transition to online teaching in COVID-19 pivot. Previously little impetus for online delivery.

    We aimed to create a uniquely Edinburgh experience with a holistic library landscape including data and special collections
    We created new and lasting links within curriculum landscape
    Delivered 2 new courses at speed – at least 1500 students have benefited from them
    Foundations for future development

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