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Bridging gaps in information literacy skills using a customised information literacy for medical undergraduates - David & Pang

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Presented at LILAC 2018

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Bridging gaps in information literacy skills using a customised information literacy for medical undergraduates - David & Pang

  1. 1. Bridging information literacy gaps using a customised information literacy framework developed for medical undergraduates LILAC Conference, 2018 (April 4-6 2018) Rebecca David, Senior Assistant Manager Caroline Pang, Director
  2. 2. Overview 1. Our Student Services 2. Observations 3. IL Intervention a) Customised Information Literacy framework for LKCMedicine Students (Year 1 -5) 4. IL Intervention Tool a) PICO & Search Strategy Worksheet b) Year 4 Scholarly Briefing Session 5. Data Collection & Analysis 6. Conclusion 2
  3. 3. Our Student Services Student Consultation Sessions Background ▪ In 2016, our Year 4 students were the pioneer batch to pursue their Scholarly Project (6 weeks) ▪ Goal: Assist students to manage their literature search, writing styles and citations. Setup ▪ Developed Medical Library blog - Service Information - Student Booking Forms ▪ Email Replies 3 Our Student Services
  4. 4. Student Consultation Sessions Process 4 Our Student Services Typically 30 minutes Discussion Teaching Student follow-up Medical librarian Medical student OBSERVATIONS
  5. 5. Observations 5 Student consultation sessions (Observations) Strengths IL skill gapsTime • scoping their search terms • using MeSH browser • developing their PICO question • conducting advanced search on database • importing citations from database to EndNote • Instead of 30 minutes, each session lasted 45minutes to 1 hour • describe their research topic clearly • breakdown their research topic and identify the keywords • present at least 2-3 articles using Google or Google Scholar as a discussion tool (2) using databases to craft search strategies and find relevant articles 2 critical IL gaps (1) using the PICO (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) framework to scope their search
  6. 6. Process 6 Our Student Services Typically 30 minutes Discussion Teaching Student follow-up Medical librarian Medical student OBSERVATIONS (1) using the PICO (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) framework to scope their search (2) using databases to craft search strategies and find relevant articles 2 critical IL gaps Developed a customised IL framework for LKCMedicine students Benchmarks (selected): ACRL IL standards for Higher Education LKCMedicine curriculum IL practices from top 3 medical schools (World) Gold standards framework Library Intervention
  7. 7. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Standards1 The medical library framework anchors on the ‘Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education’ developed and reviewed by the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). The five standards developed by the ACRL, 2000 cover:  Standard 1: The information literate student determines the nature and extent of the information needed.  Standard 2: The information literate student accesses needed information effectively and efficiently.  Standard 3: The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.  Standard 4: The information literate student, individually or as a member of a group, uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.  Standard 5: The information literate student understands many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information ethically and legally. The medical library learning objective and outcomes framework for medical students’ aligns to Standard 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. The medical library’s learning objectives and outcomes are tailored to meet information literacy skills required at a ‘foundational level’ using ‘teachable moments’ during their course of study. LKC, School of Medicine2 Curriculum Standards (Aligned to the Imperial College London – Faculty of Medicine, MBBS programme)  Years 1 and 2: Integrated Science in a Medical Context  Year 3: Core Clinical Medicine in Practice  Year 4: Medicine for All Stages of Life & in Diverse Settings  Year 5: Preparing for Practice as a Doctor Top 3 Medical Schools in the world (2016) Medical/ Health Care Library Standards Harvard University, US • Mobile Resources for Medicine3 • EBM – Evidence Based Medicine4 (Information resources) • EBM Search Tips5 University of Oxford, UK • Research Skills – Health Care Libraries6 • Medical Literature search skills7 University of Cambridge, UK • Literature Search – Services Standards8 The gold standards framework Library9  Literature review  Grey Literature  Citations  Medical Terminologies at NLM10 Benchmarks used to develop our customised Information Literacy framework for LKCMedicine students 1. (2018). Alair.ala.org. Retrieved 19 March 2018, from https://alair.ala.org/bitstream/handle/11213/7668/ACRL%20Information%20Literacy%20Competency%20Standards%20for%20Higher%20Education.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y 2. Curriculum. (2018). Lkcmedicine.ntu.edu.sg. Retrieved 19 March 2018, from http://www.lkcmedicine.ntu.edu.sg/Programmes/Intro-to-MBBS-Programme/Pages/Curriculum.asp 3. Research Guides: Mobile Resources for Medicine: Mobile Apps/Websites. (2018). Guides.library.harvard.edu. Retrieved 19 March 2018, from https://guides.library.harvard.edu/hms/mobileApps 4. Research Guides: EBM - Evidence-based Medicine: Finding Evidence - EBM Resources. (2018). Guides.library.harvard.edu. Retrieved 19 March 2018, from https://guides.library.harvard.edu/hms/ebm 5. Research Guides: EBM - Evidence-based Medicine: Finding Evidence - Search Tips. (2018). Guides.library.harvard.edu.Retrieved 19 March 2018, from https://guides.library.harvard.edu/hms/ebm/SearchTips 6. Oxford LibGuides: Medicine: Medicine. (2018). Libguides.bodleian.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 19 March 2018, from https://libguides.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/healthcarelibraries 7. Oxford LibGuides: Medical Sciences : Research Resources: Literature searching. (2018). Libguides.bodleian.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 19 March 2018, from https://libguides.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/medsci/literaturesearching 8. Support, R., Service, L., Us, A., Library, A., Team, T., & Guide, L. et al. (2018). Literature Search - Service Standards - Medical Library. Medical Library. Retrieved 19 March 2018, from https://library.medschl.cam.ac.uk/research-support/literature-search-service/ls-service-standards/ 9. Gold Standard Framework - Library. (2018). Goldstandardsframework.org.uk. Retrieved19 March 2018, from http://www.goldstandardsframework.org.uk/library-4 10. Medical Terminologies at NLM. (2018). Nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 19 March 2018, from https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medical-terms.html
  8. 8. “ Research shows that when learners lack essential frameworks, they experience difficulties in narrowing, focusing or refining their topics [3,4,5]. 8 There is evidence from the literature that a year-by-year progressive learning framework, with laddered instruction that offers close integration with undergraduate medical curricula is effective [1,2,4]. 1. Brasley, S. S. (2008). Effective Librarian and Discipline Faculty Collaboration Models for Integrating Information Literacy into the Fabric of an Academic Institution. New Directions For Teaching And Learning, (114), 71-88. 2. Haraldstad, AM. (2002). Information literacy-curriculum integration with medical school’s syllabus. Liber Quarterly: The J of Euro Res Libr, 12(2): 192-198. Retrieved 1 February 2017, from http://liber.library.uu.nl/index.php/lq/article/view/7682/7718. 3. Kuhlthau, C. C. (1993a), Seeking meaning: A process approach to library and Information services. Norwood, NJ: Ablex 4. MacEachern, M., Townsend, W., Young, K., & Rana, G. (2012). Librarian Integration in a four-year medical school curriculum: a timeline. Med Reference Services Quarterly, 31(1),105-114. doi.org/10.1080/02763869.2012.641856 5. Rempel, H. G., & Davidson, J. (2008), Providing Information Literacy Instruction to Graduate Students through Literature Review Workshops. Issues In Science And Technology Librarianship, 53. Retrieved 1 February 2017, from http://www.istl.org/08- winter/refereed2.html.
  9. 9. 9Fig 1: Customised Information Literacy Framework for LKCMedicine (Year 1 to 5), Learning Progression of Search, Writing and Citation Skills, Medical Library) © Customised Information Literacy Framework for LKCMedicine Students (Year 1 to 5) Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Scholarly Project Year 5 Foundation level Advanced level IL Intervention Implementation (2016-2017)
  10. 10. 1 2Teaching students at a year 4 scholarly project briefing session using advanced search techniques on databases, writing and citation styles Year 4 scholarly briefing session Using a PICO and search strategy worksheet for students to complete before attending a consultation PICO and search strategy worksheet IL Intervention tools Topics Covered Literature Search Literature Review Citation Management Using Turnitin Booking of Student Consultation Sessions Q&A Implementation (2017)
  11. 11. Data Collection & Analysis Fig 1: Student response rate for Student Consultation Sessions, 2016 37 16 Fig 2: Student response rate for Student Consultation Sessions, 2017 69.23% 30.77% 24 54 Student Response Rate AY2016-17/2017-18 (Med Lib – STUDENT CONSULTATION SESSIONS) n=53 n=78
  12. 12. Feedback from students AY2016-17 (Med Lib – STUDENT CONSULTATION SESSIONS) Data Collection & Analysis Table 1: Outline of participants’ feedback received for qualitative data • Voluntary qualitative feedback was sent by Year 4 students via e-mail to our Medical Library account. • 4 students expressed positive feedback based on the “recommendations for project and citation tips”, followed by 3 students expressed the student consultation session were “helpful” to them. • 1 student expressed positive feedback on the “time spent for discussion” and “the medical library offering help to students”. • 1 student explained the consultation session was “useful” and returned for two more consultations.
  13. 13. Feedback from students AY2016-17 (Med Lib – STUDENT CONSULTATION SESSIONS) Data Collection & Analysis Follow up consultations via E-mail for non-respondents • Students (n=37) who did not respond to the consultation service were sent follow up e-mails. o MeSH terms o Recommended databases o Recommended article(s) o Suggested use of the PICO method o Citation management tips. • Students were given further elaboration via mass e-mail on how to format their citations. • 2 students who did not attend the consultation sessions gave positive feedback on the follow up e-mails.
  14. 14. Scholarly Project Survey AY2017-18 (Med Lib – STUDENT CONSULTATION SESSIONS) Q: Do you feel the library’s student consultation session services should continue for the following year? Adapted from: LKCMedicine Student Voice, Educational Quality Assurance, Scholarly Project Survey, AY2017-18, 3 October 2017 Data Collection & Analysis 93.9% Agreed Overall, students agreed the library should continue conducting student consultation sessions for the following year
  15. 15. Scholarly Project Survey AY2017-18 (Med Lib – BRIEFING) Q: How do you find the library’s Year 4 scholarly project briefing session? Adapted from: LKCMedicine Student Voice, Educational Quality Assurance, Scholarly Project Survey, AY2017-18, 3 October 2017 Data Collection & Analysis 60% Overall satisfactory rate • Almost half (48.1%) of the cohort (n=52) expressed that they were satisfied with the briefing session • 26.9% of students however felt they were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied (basically neutral)
  16. 16. Scholarly Project Survey AY2017-18 (Med Lib - SKILLS) Q: The skills I have gained while working on my Scholarly Project will be useful to me in the future. Adapted from: LKCMedicine Student Voice, Educational Quality Assurance, Scholarly Project Survey, AY2017- 18, 3 October 2017 Data Collection & Analysis Overall, students agreed that the skills gained was useful to them from the Scholarly Project 98.3% Agreed
  17. 17. Perspectives of acquired skills Writing Skills Benefits of writing skills “writing a narrative paper…the experience of writing a narrative paper is different from writing a scientific paper as well” “Report writing - I learnt that every aim or every piece of information I included in the results must be addressed in the discussion and conclusion.” “Problem solving writing” “I have learnt a different approach to writing up my exploratory report.” “Writing an actual paper. I appreciate the rigour better.” “Report writing was also significantly different from that in M1 & 2, in a sense that it required a more meticulous approach at answering the aim of the question to deliver a comprehensive answer. The process of writing the report would help towards further report writings for future research projects.” “…writing a report…” (13 participants) “…Basic understanding of report writing” “…Not only am I more acquainted with the whole process of writing a research paper, I am also able to read them better.” “…being able to write research papers…This was valuable experience in learning the dos and donts of writing a paper. I also learnt the process of submitting an abstract to a conference.” Using EndNote Benefits of EndNote “…to manage citations…” Research Skills Learning to Search for Articles “…literature search…” (3 participants) “finding information… ” “reading and analyzing research papers, which can guide evidence- based medicine skills in designing research and data analysis which could be applied to clinical research as well.” “…searching for (information in) scientific papers." Benefits of managing data Statistics “…statistics…(8 participants) “…Basic understanding of statistics…” “…doing statistics on my own research help me retain the skills better.” “Statistical analysis because research and reading papers will be a part of any clinician's work.” “SPSS - i am able to analyze data with greater confidence.” “Learning how to process statistical data and how to interpret it.” “…and how to perform statistical analysis …” Data Collection “data collection really helped me to learn how to use TTSH systems well…” Data Analysis “…data analysis - helped me underst and a bit more about statistics Benefits of Literature review “…doing literature review…” (11 participants) “Sifting through countless reviews and journals to find the most up to date sources for knowledge or clinical application purposes…” “…important skill that is used in any form of research.” “…impt to do evidence based medicine” “Literature review, to sieve through vast amounts of information available online…” Interpreting Systematic reviews “Process of conducting a systematic review and understandin g how evidence is synthesized may be helpful in interpreting studies.” Formulating research questions “…crafting research questions will help me in my own research in the future.” “…importan ce of forming a good research question and designing study.” Experience on research process “Understandi ng the research process “ “The rigour and process of research is universally applicable in whatever fields we choose in future. I can appreciate what goes into conducting research.” “Research skills” “How to plan and design research proj.” “Basic understanding of the planning and execution of a clinical research” “designing research…skills in future if we join a residency.” Experience in project management “I learnt how to start up a project and it also sparked my interest in the research aspect.” Q: Please explain which skills and why.
  18. 18. Conclusion 18 ▪ Student consultation sessions was first conducted in 2016 and continued in 2017 to help Year 4 students manage their literature search, writing styles & citation management. This service will continue in 2018. ▪ In 2017, survey questions in the Scholarly Project Survey AY2017-18 (Med Lib) received an overall positive feedback from students about their literature search, data and citation management. ▪ In 2018, the team will further enhance the Year 4 scholarly briefing session using a new intervention tool – “Tips Sheet” ▪ Evidence suggests that the most effective method of developing information literate students is to embed or integrate information literacy throughout the curriculum (Brown & Nelson, 2003; Samson, 2010; Tuttle et al., 2009). ▪ Requires collaborative efforts of educators, librarians, administrators, and the institution in which they all work. ▪ By doing this, the future direction provides medical librarians an opportunity to complement efficient literature search with the application of formal rules of evidence and develop an expert team of future healthcare professionals (medical students) from LKCMedicine.
  19. 19. Q & A 19
  20. 20. Thank you very much for your time 20 You can contact us at medlib@ntu.edu.sg

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