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Academic staff perspectives of student digital literacy skills - Angela Newton

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Presented at LILAC 2018

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Academic staff perspectives of student digital literacy skills - Angela Newton

  1. 1. Academic staff perspectives of student digital literacy skills Angela Newton April 2018
  2. 2. Context • Library strategic action: –What can Skills@Library do to support student* digital literacy? –Investigation of current good practice, literature, research, perceptions. *Undergraduate and Masters students at the University of Leeds
  3. 3. The survey Bristol Online Surveys Likert scale, multi-choice, free response questions Distributed to academic staff in most faculties at Leeds 143 responses from staff teaching Undergraduate and Masters students
  4. 4. Respondents by faulty Arts Humanities and Cultures = 59 Medicine and Health = 27 Engineering = 18 Education, Social Sciences, Politics and Law = 18 Biological Sciences = 10 Maths and Physical Sciences = 10 Environment = 0 Business = 0
  5. 5. What did they say? Students are motivated to learn new digital literacy skills. Students are given opportunities to develop their digital literacy skills at Leeds Students are routinely expected to source appropriate information online without guidance. Students graduate from Leeds with digital literacy skills that are good enough for graduate work.
  6. 6. What did they say? Students coming to Leeds don’t have good enough digital literacy skills. Students don’t think enough about the credibility of the digital information they use. Students are not proficient in using appropriate digital tools and resources for their study/research
  7. 7. Opinion was divided on whether: Students are able to create and curate their own online learning spaces (e.g. Evernote or Google Docs) Students make effective use of the digital tools provided by the University. Leeds students are given guidance about creating and curating their digital profile(s).
  8. 8. Free response comments Lots of students lack Microsoft skills (e.g. long documents, Excel) Coding should be considered a basic digital literacy skill Staff expectations are high Students overestimate their digital literacy and are embarrassed to ask for help Students are competent with social media, but this doesn’t equip them for assessing information Students believe that all ‘answers’ can be found online rather than through enquiry
  9. 9. What would you do?
  10. 10. How did staff want Skills@Library to help? Provide more help for students on critical analysis More face-to-face help - there are too many online tutorials already Self assessment quizzes Tailored activities on how to find information for your subject Webinars and videos on digital literacy topics Online learning activities to develop student digital literacy
  11. 11. How did staff want Skills@Library to help? Provide more help for students on critical analysis More face-to-face help. There are too many online tutorials already Self assessment quizzes Tailored activities on how to find information for your subject Webinars and videos on digital literacy topics Online learning activities to develop student digital literacy
  12. 12. What can we conclude? Everyone agrees that digital literacy is important Everyone has a different view of what digital literacy is Staff don’t always know about or use existing services Is there ‘too much’ online only training in HE? We need to make digital literacy more obvious as a ‘thing’ that Skills@Library offer support for

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