Get a job in the games industry
Research <ul><li>Be clear about what job you would like and who you would ideally work for.  </li></ul><ul><li>SWOT your f...
Networking <ul><li>Networking efforts is to position yourself to interview and, even better, get hired for these unadverti...
Foot in the door <ul><li>Apply to big developers and publishers, not small studios. </li></ul><ul><li>Be as flexible on lo...
Portfolio <ul><li>Portfolio </li></ul><ul><li>20 pieces </li></ul><ul><li>Be prepared to leave it and not get it back </li...
Curriculum Vitae <ul><li>1 page unless you’re famous </li></ul><ul><li>Follow local CV conventions </li></ul><ul><li>Keep ...
Build online presence  <ul><li>Lodge your CV with </li></ul><ul><li>www.gamesindustry.biz/jobs/ </li></ul><ul><li>www.gama...
Cover letter <ul><li>A good cover letter is  </li></ul><ul><li>Tailored to the company you’re applying to </li></ul><ul><l...
Interviews <ul><li>Clean  </li></ul><ul><li>Punctual (let them know if you’re going to be late) </li></ul><ul><li>Studied ...
Interview technique <ul><li>You should come prepared with questions.  </li></ul><ul><li>How do you organise training? </li...
Resources <ul><li>Useful reads </li></ul><ul><li>http: //blogs . smh .com.au/screenplay/archives//018174.html </li></ul><u...
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Getting a job in the videogames industry

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Wisdom pulled from all over re getting a job making games

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  • Research shows that the interactive entertainment industry is currently experiencing large growth in Australia, stated earlier this month as being 15 per cent year-on-year. However, currently the industry is seen by many to be highly competitive, unstable, and not as financially rewarding as other similar industries, when comparing salaries against similar workloads in other IT fields. http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-get-a-job-in-the-video-game-industry How To Get A Job In The Video Game Industry
  • Getting a job in the videogames industry

    1. 1. Get a job in the games industry
    2. 2. Research <ul><li>Be clear about what job you would like and who you would ideally work for. </li></ul><ul><li>SWOT your future </li></ul><ul><li>Research likely companies. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify useful people inside target companies. </li></ul><ul><li>Read trade publications, both online and print, such as GIGnews.com, Gamasutra, Gamedev.net, GameDaily, and Game Developer </li></ul><ul><li>Professional associations such as the Games Developers Association Australia (GDAA), International Game Developers Association (IGDA) and the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences are also very useful resources. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Networking <ul><li>Networking efforts is to position yourself to interview and, even better, get hired for these unadvertised jobs. You never know who can help you, so talk to as many people as you can. The most important information you want to get from people when your networking is the names of other people you can contact. </li></ul><ul><li>As you get ready to network, keep in mind the purposes you want to accomplish: </li></ul><ul><li>Gather insider information and opinions </li></ul><ul><li>Make connections </li></ul><ul><li>Get your name circulating </li></ul><ul><li>Find mentors who will help you </li></ul><ul><li>Gather information to help tailor your resume and presentation to the target companies. </li></ul><ul><li>1-minute pitch-a 1-minute summary of who you are, what you have accomplished, and what you wish to accomplish. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.gamecareerguide.com/features/290/the_first_step__getting_a_game_.php?page=6 </li></ul>
    4. 4. Foot in the door <ul><li>Apply to big developers and publishers, not small studios. </li></ul><ul><li>Be as flexible on location as possible. Once you have gained industry experience, you will gain more control of where you end up working. </li></ul><ul><li>Work as a tester (QA). </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone wants experience -- get it however you can </li></ul>
    5. 5. Portfolio <ul><li>Portfolio </li></ul><ul><li>20 pieces </li></ul><ul><li>Be prepared to leave it and not get it back </li></ul><ul><li>Demo Game </li></ul><ul><li>“ If you are trying to get into the industry and don't have previous employment experience, you somehow need to demonstrate your ability, or prove that you can actually implement your ideas. … The best way, hands down, to prove your ability is to create a video game… it doesn't have to be a releasable commercial blockbuster, just a complete game, however simple, with a front end, a game, an end-of-game sequence, hi score table etc.” http://www.zee-3.com/pickfordbros/articles/getting_into_the_industry.php </li></ul><ul><li>Showreel </li></ul><ul><li>Short is better </li></ul><ul><li>Only your best work </li></ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul><ul><li>Professional -- keep it simple, clear navigation, legible design, spellchecked </li></ul><ul><li>No dead links, no silly widgets </li></ul><ul><li>Forefront your best work but don’t include work you’re not proud of </li></ul><ul><li>BE READY TO TALK INTELLIGENTLY ABOUT ANY OF YOUR WORK BUT BE SURE YOU HAVE ONE THAT YOU CAN SPECIFY AS ‘YOUR FAVORITE’ </li></ul>
    6. 6. Curriculum Vitae <ul><li>1 page unless you’re famous </li></ul><ul><li>Follow local CV conventions </li></ul><ul><li>Keep it serious, be confident but realistic </li></ul><ul><li>Too many jobs in too short a time can signal problems. </li></ul><ul><li>If it isn’t clear which is your given name and which is your surname, underline the latter. </li></ul><ul><li>Referees should be relevant, objective and professional </li></ul>
    7. 7. Build online presence <ul><li>Lodge your CV with </li></ul><ul><li>www.gamesindustry.biz/jobs/ </li></ul><ul><li>www.gamasutra.com/jobsearch/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.thegamesindustry.net/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.linkedin.com/ </li></ul>
    8. 8. Cover letter <ul><li>A good cover letter is </li></ul><ul><li>Tailored to the company you’re applying to </li></ul><ul><li>Short – about half a page – or 200-300 words </li></ul><ul><li>Neatly typed and laid-out </li></ul><ul><li>Grammatical, </li></ul><ul><li>Properly spelt. </li></ul><ul><li>It is polite to write the salutation (“Dear Ms. Manager,”) and the sign-off (“Yours sincerely”) by hand. </li></ul><ul><li>Double-check who you are applying to – telephone if you have to – and put their name, title and address correctly at the top of the page. </li></ul><ul><li>Show that you know something about the company and the industry. This is where your research comes in. Don't go overboard--just make it clear that you didn't pick this company out of the phone book. You know who they are, what they do and you have chosen them! </li></ul><ul><li>Use terms and phrases that are meaningful to the employer. (This is where your industry research and networking come in.) </li></ul>
    9. 9. Interviews <ul><li>Clean </li></ul><ul><li>Punctual (let them know if you’re going to be late) </li></ul><ul><li>Studied up on the organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Enthusiastic but never pushy, friendly but not sycophantic, focused but not aggressive, and keen but never desperate. </li></ul><ul><li>Always shake hands. </li></ul><ul><li>Based on Debrett’s “Modern Etiquette” </li></ul><ul><li>After an interview a short, polite letter to the main person who interviewed you can be a good idea. You should say ‘thank you’ and highlight anything you felt you might have missed in the interview (e.g. ‘I think that I may have forgotten to mention that although I dropped out of Harvard without graduating, I do run the world’s largest software corporation’) or anything you want to emphasise (e.g. ‘I feel my experience with 3D graphics in my last job would be very relevant to your project’). Very, very few people do this and it is a good way to make a strong, positive impression. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.gamedev.net/reference/articles/article599.asp </li></ul><ul><li>How to approach an interview </li></ul>
    10. 10. Interview technique <ul><li>You should come prepared with questions. </li></ul><ul><li>How do you organise training? </li></ul><ul><li>How will my work be assessed? (this is better than saying how often do I get a pay rise) </li></ul><ul><li>How do you ensure projects come in on time? </li></ul><ul><li>How are games designed? Who does the design? </li></ul><ul><li>Describe a typical team? </li></ul><ul><li>If a job offer is made – can I meet some prospective team members and my manager? </li></ul><ul><li>As with the cover letter, this is also a good opportunity for you to show some interest in the company. Look at their website before the interview and think of a couple of company-specific questions. </li></ul><ul><li>In the first interview you may not get a lot of time for questions, but you should make sure that all your questions are answered before you accept a job offer. You are interviewing them at this stage. </li></ul><ul><li>Also, be prepared to talk intelligently about the game development process and your favourite games as well as the usual kinds of interview questions. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Resources <ul><li>Useful reads </li></ul><ul><li>http: //blogs . smh .com.au/screenplay/archives//018174.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://kotaku.com/gaming/comic-con-07/how-to-get-a-job-in-the-games-industry-283073.php </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.gamecareerguide.com/features/392/how_to_really_get_your_first_job_in_the_game_industry.php </li></ul><ul><li>http://sloperama.com/advice.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.patrickcurry.com/thoughts/creating-the-ultimate-game-design-portfolio/ </li></ul><ul><li>Industry organisations </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.gdaa.com.au </li></ul>

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