Class #28

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  • “ You can’t say that you believe in human dignity or human rights if you’re not willing to defend them.” Maybe ask about this in a way that gets out what the Church is saying about ‘already, but not yet’
  • Video: “War is necessary” We recruit and train people to kill But we don’t tell them why it’s okay It’s not that it’s not hard to kill—people are shcoked at how hard it is to kill another human being But sometimes killing is morally justifiable War has been brought on to a peaceloving people In war, it’s not that morality doesn’t apply “ In war, morality is most important, b/c the soldier can do so much good or bad” War can be an awful, but necessary and morally right choice. “ You can’t say that you believe in human dignity or human rights if you’re not willing to defend them.” Asked how to defend killing on a listserv: -’done things I supremely regret; will I ever again be the person I used to like?’
  • Class #28

    1. 1. <ul><li>Just Cause </li></ul><ul><li>Competent Authority </li></ul><ul><li>Comparative Justice </li></ul><ul><li>Right Intention </li></ul><ul><li>Last Resort </li></ul><ul><li>Probability of Success </li></ul><ul><li>Proportionality </li></ul>
    2. 2. <ul><li>Discrimination </li></ul><ul><li>Proportionality </li></ul>D P
    3. 3. <ul><li>According to Just War Thinking: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Good consequences cannot make an otherwise bad (i.e., indiscriminate) act good; but ... </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bad consequences can make an otherwise good (i.e., discriminate) act bad. </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. What’s your reaction to Major Kilner’s statement from the video: “You can’t say that you believe in human dignity or human rights if you’re not willing to defend them”? Work into your response your understanding of what the Church means in The Challenge of Peace about the ‘already, but not yet’ dimension of the Kingdom of God. vt
    5. 5. <ul><li>review the two main categories of just war norms and how they originated, </li></ul><ul><li>examine what the Church sees as the relationship between the tradition of justified violence and the tradition of Christian pacifism, and </li></ul><ul><li>evaluate the application of these norms to specific contemporary conflicts. </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>I. The Just War Criteria </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A. Pacifism vs. Just War Thought </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1. “Already, but not yet” (§ 58) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2. Pacifism | Just War (2 traditions , §§ 62, 73 ) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How are they related? (§§ 73-74, 120-121) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B. Two Sets of Criteria </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>II. Some cases applying these criteria. </li></ul></ul>Jus ad bellum Jus in bello

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