Jon Keefe - Online Communities

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Jon Keefe's presentation on Building Online Communities given at our Manchester Seminar on the 1st July and in London on the 6th July

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Jon Keefe - Online Communities

  1. 1. Building Online Communities<br />July 1st 2010<br />Jon Keefe CEO KMP Digitata<br />
  2. 2. Community Memory 1973<br />Community Memory ’73 1st Public BBS – Berkeley San Francisco experiment to understand how people would react to exchanging information via computer<br />
  3. 3. History of Communities online<br />Usenet ‘79 – organised into topical categories called newsgroups<br />Usenet resembled Bulletin Board Systems (BBS) which were precursors of today’s internet forums<br />MUD (Multi-User Dungeons)<br />multi-user real-time virtual world represented in text<br />IRC (Internet Relay Chat)<br />a form of real-time Internet text messaging (chat) or synchronous conferencing<br />Chat Rooms<br />BBS<br />SysOP home-hosted systems<br />Today’s Threaded Internet Forums<br />www.biofind.com<br />Community 2.0<br />Web 2.0 technologies plus a community<br />
  4. 4. Definition<br />When people carry on public discussions long enough, with sufficient human feeling, to form webs of personal relationships<br />Howard Rheingold <br />Author- Virtual Communities (1993)<br />
  5. 5. Other Leading Lights<br />Mark Granovetter<br />American sociologist at Stanford University<br /> Theories on the spread of information in social networks known as "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973).<br />Malcolm Gladwell<br />“The Tipping Point” where he talks of “the moment of critical mass, the threshold, the boiling point.”<br />
  6. 6. What makes up Online Community<br />An enabling technology<br />Ning, wordpress<br />A core topic<br />Passionate contributors<br />Background crowd<br />An unwritten social contract of trust<br />Moderators (sometimes)<br />
  7. 7. Examples of the purpose of online communities<br />Activism<br />Clan (gaming)<br />Research test bed<br />Technology Strategy Board 30,000 representative UK onliners www.innovateuk.org<br />Support Groups<br />
  8. 8. Examples of the purpose of online communities<br />Ethnography<br />Hobbies<br />www.flickr.com - photography<br />www.redbubble.com - poetry<br />Answers<br />www.blurt-it.com<br />A highly networked individual’s social graph<br />
  9. 9. Biofind<br />
  10. 10. Mercedes forum<br />
  11. 11. Second Life<br />
  12. 12. Make up of a community<br />Peripheral (i.e. Lurker)<br />– An outside, unstructured participation<br />Inbound (i.e. Novice)<br />Newcomer is invested in the community and heading towards full participation<br />Insider (i.e. Regular)<br />Full committed community participant<br />Leader (i.e. Champion)<br />A leader, sustains membership participation and brokers interactions<br />
  13. 13. Make up of a community<br />Peripheral =1000<br />Inbound =100<br />Insider =10<br />Leader =1<br />
  14. 14. Community participation<br />Lurkers don’t readily participate because they don’t believe they need to and in not doing so they are being helpful<br />Leaders participate because they believe that their actions will have positive outcomes<br />Member participation is not based on hierarchical needs or goals-driven theories but desire planning and they environment<br />Increasing participation in online communities: A framework for<br />human–computer interaction:JonathanBishop<br />
  15. 15. Dynamics of Communities<br />Lurker<br />Inbound<br />Insider<br />Leader 1<br />Lurker<br />Lurker<br />Inbound<br />Lurker<br />Host<br />Lurker<br />Leader 2<br />Insider<br />Lurker<br />Lurker<br />Inbound<br />Leader 3<br />Lurker<br />Insider<br />Inbound<br />
  16. 16. Value of Community<br />User 1<br />£<br />£ ?<br />Host<br />£<br />User 2<br />£ ?<br />£<br />£ ?<br />User 3<br />
  17. 17. Monetisation summary<br />Good Old fashioned cpc mechanisms<br />Subscription or freemium models<br />Relationship commissions <br />
  18. 18. Other value in community<br />Conversation/dialogue<br />Sentiment<br />Influence<br />Co-learning<br />Collaboration<br />
  19. 19. Qualitative Signs of success<br />Signs of ownership within the community<br />Self-policing<br />Rituals<br />Off-line actions begin<br />
  20. 20. Quantitative success metrics<br />Number of new members<br />Number leaving members<br />Member satisfaction<br />Number and type of content items created<br />Number of connections / relationships created<br />Time on site<br />Frequency of visits<br />Recommendations & Referrals<br />
  21. 21. Building a community<br />Don’t let technology drive the community<br />Seed content with known champions in the topic<br />Inaugural members act as roll models<br />Define code of conduct<br />Beta<br />Keep participation simple<br />Initially all content open unless as part of a reward<br />
  22. 22. Building a community<br />Politely provoke and reward participation<br />Track strangers/lurkers and try to promote them through desire<br />Be active and part of the community yourself<br />Set an example<br />It takes time!<br />
  23. 23. Summary<br />Online communities have social structure just like the real world because they comprise real people!<br />Online communities have a voice and an opinion<br />Online communities can be valued in many ways<br />
  24. 24. Summary<br />Be careful, you don’t want to be thrown out of your own community.<br />Because the lunatics will take over the asylum<br />
  25. 25. Thank you, any questions?<br />

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