EU BEST PRACTICES
LONDON, ENGLAND
KKH4284 SUSTAINABLE URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
MUHAMMAD IMRAN MOHD JUNAIDI A133239
SYUHAIDAH HANI...
Introduction
• London is the capital city of England and the United
Kingdom.
• It is the most populated region, urban zone and
metropol...
Climate change
• London is already feeling the effects of climate change. It is
particularly vulnerable to flooding, subsidence, overheat...
Land use
• The city of London is the heart of the world leading
financial, business and maritime centre with a range of
business or...
Nature and biodiversity
• Biodiversity is the amazing richness and variety of wildlife
and habitats on Earth, from snowfields to rainforests and
f...
• The Mayor's Biodiversity Strategy is the first regional
biodiversity strategy with a statutory basis.
• The document det...
TRANSPORT
• Encourage walking, cycling and public transport
• Introduced Congestion Charge
• Charged £8 on vehicles wishing to enter...
ADVANTAGES
• A report from the Department for Transport claims:
• 70,000 fewer cars in Central London
• 6% more bus journe...
BEDDINGTON ZERO ENERGY
DEVELOPMENT(BEDZED)
• An environmentally friendly housing development in
Hackbridge, London, England.
• It was designed by the architect Bill ...
ADVANTAGES
• Space-heating requirements were 88% less
• Hot water consumption was 57% less
• Mains-water consumption has b...
WATER QUALITY
• The City of London receives its treated
water from both the Lake Huron Water
Supply System (approximately 85% of
the dai...
• On an annual basis, the City of London performs over
12,000 water quality tests.
• London also has 10 locations througho...
WASTE STRATEGIES
The Mayor’s key targets are:
Achieve zero municipal waste
direct to landfill by 2025.
Reduce the amount of household
was...
LONG TERM
INFRASTRUCTURE
INVESTMENT PLAN FOR
LONDON
• London’s infrastructure is already under pressure, and
London’s population continues to grow.
• Current projections sugg...
• The scope covers public
transport, roads, energy, water,
sewerage, waste and green
infrastructure.
• Critical social inf...
THANK YOU
EU Best Practices - London, England
EU Best Practices - London, England
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Task 4 for the Sustainable Urban Development Course in Civil Engineering

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EU Best Practices - London, England

  1. 1. EU BEST PRACTICES LONDON, ENGLAND KKH4284 SUSTAINABLE URBAN DEVELOPMENT MUHAMMAD IMRAN MOHD JUNAIDI A133239 SYUHAIDAH HANI HUSSIN A133529 SITI YUHANA YUNUS A133344
  2. 2. Introduction
  3. 3. • London is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom. • It is the most populated region, urban zone and metropolitan area in UK. • With the population of 21 million, it is the most populated municipality in the EU and accounting for 12.5% of the UK pop.
  4. 4. Climate change
  5. 5. • London is already feeling the effects of climate change. It is particularly vulnerable to flooding, subsidence, overheating and to water supply shortfalls. • Therefore to tackling climate change, the Mayor have required developments to make the fullest contribution to the mitigation of and adaptation to climate change and to minimize emissions of carbon dioxide. • The following hierarchy will be used to assess applications: • Using less energy, in particular by adopting sustainable design and construction measures • Supplying energy efficiently in particular by prioritizing decentralized energy generation • Using renewable energy
  6. 6. Land use
  7. 7. • The city of London is the heart of the world leading financial, business and maritime centre with a range of business orientated land use including offices, retail and hotels. • To encourage healthy lifestyle for all the City’s communities, city council have improved access to open space and facilities is encourage
  8. 8. Nature and biodiversity
  9. 9. • Biodiversity is the amazing richness and variety of wildlife and habitats on Earth, from snowfields to rainforests and from mountain tops to the deep ocean floor. • Even in 21st-century Britain the range of biodiversity is extraordinary. • In the busiest city park and the quietest rocky cove there is an enormous number of individual species, each one superbly adapted for its own environmental needs.
  10. 10. • The Mayor's Biodiversity Strategy is the first regional biodiversity strategy with a statutory basis. • The document details the Mayor's vision for protecting and conserving London's natural open spaces. • It seeks to ensure that there is no overall loss of wildlife habitats in London, and that more open spaces are created and made accessible, so that all Londoners are within walking distance of a quality natural space. • The strategy is an important first step in establishing a Londonwide framework for maintaining London’s diversity of wildlife.
  11. 11. TRANSPORT
  12. 12. • Encourage walking, cycling and public transport • Introduced Congestion Charge • Charged £8 on vehicles wishing to enter central London on weekday daytimes • The profit from the scheme is used to improve London’s transport infrastructure.
  13. 13. ADVANTAGES • A report from the Department for Transport claims: • 70,000 fewer cars in Central London • 6% more bus journeys • 12% more bicycle trips • 15 million litres of fuel saved per year • Extra £137m raised to invest in transport in 2006/7
  14. 14. BEDDINGTON ZERO ENERGY DEVELOPMENT(BEDZED)
  15. 15. • An environmentally friendly housing development in Hackbridge, London, England. • It was designed by the architect Bill Dunster to support a more sustainable lifestyle. • Zero energy-use only energy from renewable sources generated on site(777 square metres of solar panels) • Water efficient-most rain water falling on the site is collected and reused • Waste recycling-refuse:collection facilities are designed to support recycling
  16. 16. ADVANTAGES • Space-heating requirements were 88% less • Hot water consumption was 57% less • Mains-water consumption has been reduced by 50 % or 67% compares to a power shower household • The residents’ car mileage is 65% less
  17. 17. WATER QUALITY
  18. 18. • The City of London receives its treated water from both the Lake Huron Water Supply System (approximately 85% of the daily consumption) and the Elgin Area Water Supply System. • The water treatment of London's two primary water sources fall under the jurisdiction of two Boards: the Lake Huron Primary Water Supply System Joint Board of Management and the Elgin Area Primary Water Supply System Joint Board of Management.
  19. 19. • On an annual basis, the City of London performs over 12,000 water quality tests. • London also has 10 locations throughout the city in which continuous online sampling of chlorine residual is monitored. • All of these efforts help ensure that the water within the distribution system is always of high quality.
  20. 20. WASTE STRATEGIES
  21. 21. The Mayor’s key targets are: Achieve zero municipal waste direct to landfill by 2025. Reduce the amount of household waste produced from 970kg to 790kg per household in 2031. Increase London’s capacity to reuse or repair from 6,000 tonnes- a-year to 30,000 by 2031. Recycle or compost at least 60% by 2031. Cut greenhouse emissions by one million tonnes by 2031. Generate as much energy as possible from organic and non- recyclable waste.
  22. 22. LONG TERM INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT PLAN FOR LONDON
  23. 23. • London’s infrastructure is already under pressure, and London’s population continues to grow. • Current projections suggest London’s population will hit 10 million by the early 2030s. • Climate change presents further long term challenges. • To ensure London has the infrastructure needed to remain one of the best cities in the world to live, work and do business in. • The aim in developing a long term infrastructure investment plan is: to help the city prepare better for this growth over the very long term, while working out how we can overcome current problems and bring fresh thinking into delivering the infrastructure the city needs.
  24. 24. • The scope covers public transport, roads, energy, water, sewerage, waste and green infrastructure. • Critical social infrastructure is also included – in particular the overall amount and approximate distribution of housing (including affordable housing) and school places.
  25. 25. THANK YOU

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