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ANC - Sectoral committees in Romania

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ANC - Sectoral committees in Romania

  1. 1. SECTORAL COMMITTEESIN ROMANIADenmark, May 27- June 1, 2013Irina Dumitriu, PhDMethodological expert for the National Authority for Qualifications,IMI PQ NET Romania
  2. 2. “Sectoral approaches are a basic element oflifelong learning policy that includes initiativessuch as the European qualificationsframework (EQF), the European creditsystem for vocational education and training(ECVET) and the related issues of learningoutcomes and validation of non formal andinformal Learning”Cedefop, “Sectoral Partnerships”, 2009
  3. 3. Chronologyof the setting up of SCs in RomaniaJune 8, 2004June 8, 2004 – a Memorandum signed by the Romanian Government– a Memorandum signed by the Romanian Governmenton the Romanian NQF, changing the National Adult Training Boardon the Romanian NQF, changing the National Adult Training Board(NATB) into the National Authority for Qualifications (NAQ)(NATB) into the National Authority for Qualifications (NAQ)December 7, 2004December 7, 2004 –– Law 559Law 559 modifying the Law 132/1999 regarding132/1999 regardingthe setting-up, organization and functioning of the NATBthe setting-up, organization and functioning of the NATB fortransforming it into the NAQFebruary 25, 2005February 25, 2005 – a Tripartite Agreement for NQF signed between– a Tripartite Agreement for NQF signed betweenthe Romanian Government and the national representativethe Romanian Government and the national representativeconfederations of trade unions and employersconfederations of trade unions and employers
  4. 4. 2005 – 2008: 23 SCs are set up based on sector agreements betweensocial partners and the NATB/NAQ:1. Agriculture, fishery, fishing and hunting2. Environmental protection3. Geology, mining, energy4. Chemistry and petro-chemistry industries5. Electro, automation, electronics, IT industries6. Ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy and refractory products7. Mechanical engineering, precision mechanics, equipment anddevices8. Forestry, wood exploitation and processing, pulp and paperindustries9. Building materials, cement, glass, fine ceramics industries10. Construction
  5. 5. 11. Food, beverages and tobacco industry12. Textile, clothing, leather goods and footware13. Transport14. Post and telecommunications15. Mass-media, publishing and printing16. Commerce17. Finance, banking, insurance18. Public administration and services19. Tourism, hotels, restaurants20. Education and training, research and design, culture and sports21. Health, hygiene, social services22. Handicrafts and traditional crafts23. Other industries and services
  6. 6. The SCs’ main tasks mentioned in the Tripartite Agreement• To participate in the development of the normative framework onthe training, the competence assessment and certification;• To promote the competence based training and assessmentsystem,• To develop and update the qualifications relevant for each sector,under the coordination of the NATB/NAQ;• To validate qualifications and associated standards;• To identify the experts able to carry out occupational analysis, todefine competences and qualifications and also to assess andcertify competences based on standards;• To encourage the organisations’ and individuals’ participation inthe VET.
  7. 7. Further chronologyof the setting up of SCsThe Law 268/2009:the SCs had to be reorganised as legal entities,institutions for social dialogue of public interestwith well defined attributions in the field of qualificationsand with part of their operational costs and their costs with thesectoral checking and validation of occupational and trainingstandards services financed from the state budget
  8. 8. 16 SCs have been set up under the new law (1)1. Textile, clothing, leather goods and footware2. Tourism, hotels, restaurants3. Finance, banking, insurance4. Ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy and refractoryproducts5. Culture6. Machine building industry7. Public administration and services8. Health and social assistance9. Agriculture, fishery and fishing
  9. 9. 16 SCs have been set up under the new law(2)10. Training in environmental protection11. Transport12. Forestry, wood exploitation and processing, furnitureindustry13. Mass-media14. Construction15. Electricity, heating, oil and gas industry16. Petro-chemistry and chemistry
  10. 10. The attributes of the sectoral committees (1)• To participate in the design of national and sectoral training strategies;• To participate in the development of the normative framework on thetraining, the competence assessment and certification;• To promote the competence based training and assessment system;• To develop and update the qualifications relevant for each sector,under the coordination of the NAQ;• To validate the qualifications and their associated training standardsexcept those aquired within the higher education system;• To recommend the experts on different occupational areas able to carryout occupational analyses, to define competences and qualifications, tocarry out and validate occupational standards, to check and validatetraining standards, to assess and certificate competences based onstandards and to approve the work done by these experts.
  11. 11. The attributes of the sectoral committees (2)• To encourage the organisations’ and individuals’ participation in the VET;• To collaborate with ministries and other specialised bodies of the centralpublic administration, with autonomous administrative authorities, withnational and international NGOs, with training providers;• To provide consultancy to the social partners on employment and trainingof the workforce at sectoral level;• To carry out occupational analyses and studies regarding the labour forcedemand in the sector;• To give an advisory opinion on the updating of the Classification ofOccupations in Romania;• To propose to the training providers the demanded by the labour marketqualifications and their correlation with the jobs/occupations;• To decide on other activities to be carried out for the benefit of the sectorthey represent.
  12. 12. Further chronologyof the setting up of SCs2012: 8 of the legally established sectoralcommittees have joined forces by founding theNational Association of the Sectoral Committeesfrom Romania (NASCR)2013: 2 more SCs became members of theNASCR
  13. 13. The “Finance, banking, insurance” SectoralCommittee• more than 100 SC’s experts were trained as Occupational Analyses (AO)– Occupational Standards (OS) - related Qualifications (Q) developers,checkers and validators and as competence assessors; some of themdeveloped, checked or validated 24 OA, OS and related Q and developedand tested assessment tools for 15 occupations for which a competenceassessment and certification center was authorized in two ESF co-financed projects undertaken by the Romanian Banking Institute (RBI);• the SC took into discussion the results of an EBTN project implementedby several European banking institutes (including the RBI) proposing theadoption of 5 fundamental/general competences to be included in all theEU OS for the financial services industry;• In total, the SC has checked and validated 26 new OS and related Q and4 revised ones.
  14. 14. The “Ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy and refractory products”Sectoral Committee (“Metalurgia” SC)• The SC’s experts participated in the analysis of 9 qualifications,training standards and curricula in the vocational and technicaleducation within the strategic ESF co-financed project “Revisedcurriculum in vocational and technical education”• The SC is an active member of the South Muntenia DevelopmentRegion Pact for Employment and Social Inclusion• The SC’s experts are undergoing now the process of checking andvalidating the revision of 4 OS developed in the pilot stage of thisactivity in Romania (in 1997-1999 period)
  15. 15. The “Health and social assistance” Sectoral CommitteeSince it was set-up, the SC has checked and validated 14 new OS andrelated Q and 2 revised ones
  16. 16. The sectoral committees in Romania are only in anemerging stage of their institutional development and themain challenges are their financing and the training needsof a large number of experts to be able to develop a hugenumber of occupational standards and relatedqualifications that are demanded on the labour market.Making sectoral committees work should be a sharedresponsibility between social partners and the publicsector. Public and sectoral representatives need to workwith each other to understand each other’s strengths andweaknesses with respect to education and training policy.Sectoral committees need to share information andexperience not only at national level, but also at the EUand international level.

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