Best-Practices Webinar Series    The Power of Near-Peer Mentoring:     Supporting your First Generation        and Underse...
Panelists                                                                                                Joseph Colon     ...
Colorado State University
The Dream ProjectA student-initiated high school outreach program that connectsCSU students with first-generation and low-...
Dual Focus1. To give these college-bound high school students the assistance   they may not receive at home or elsewhere2....
Fast Facts•History: Began in 2008 under the leadership of Jim Rawlins; based        on the model at University of Washingt...
Who are Dream Scholars?•High school students attending Fort Collins area high schools•First-Generation, multicultural and/...
Who is the Dream Team?• 34 Students currently enrolled at CSU• Students who have already demonstrated leadership on campus...
How are they paired?Similarity in:1. Gender2. Ethnicity3. Life Experiences
Activities•Essay writing•SAT preparation classes•Signature events•Admissions weekends at CSU•1-on-1 with your CSU mentor
Best Practices1. Dream Team Training2. “For Students, By Students”3. Learning from Others
#1: Dream Team Training•A two-hour weekly class taught by Professor Blane Harding•Use a syllabus and workbook•Course Credit
Workbook & Syllabus
#2: For Students, By Students  “We believe in providing vehicles for student leadership and engagement.”Created for studen...
Student Leadership Chart   Classroom                             Community           External                             ...
#3: Learning From Others Bringing the success of University of Washington to CSU                           CSU 2010   CSU ...
Things to Consider1. Recruitment as the Byproduct, Not the Goal2. Teaching Professionalism
#1: Recruitment as Byproduct                             NOT THE GOAL! Last year, one third of the Dream Scholars matricul...
#2: Teaching Professionalism 1. Attention to detail and specificity of thought and language 2. Prompt response to communic...
Bryant University
4MILEA Peer Mentoring program for domestic and international students ofcolor designed to give them a ‘sense of belonging’...
Four PillarsC - CultureA – AcademicsP – Personal GrowthS – Social Development
Who are the Mentees?            125 first year students who represent                various cultural backgrounds.The prog...
Who are the Mentors?• 32 Current Bryant University students• Completed Application• Successful interview process• Many are...
Fast Facts• History: Founded 10 years ago, originally as an orientation        for international students• Staffing: Inter...
Key Components • Mentor Hiring Process • Summer Outreach • Week-long intense program • Fall and Spring Activities • Year-l...
Best Practices1. Integrating International and Multicultural Students2. Requiring a Year-Long Commitment
#1: Integration        • Shared experiences amongst underrepresented groups        • Ability to address issues of race    ...
#2: Requiring a Year•Address transition needs beyond the first week of school•Adequate time to build relationships between...
Something to Consider                  • Hiring mentors with integrity                    • Dispelling the ‘Clique’ MythRe...
Johns Hopkins University
MAPPMAPP (Mentoring Assistance Peer Program) focuses on thefirst year experience by supporting underrepresentedfreshmen at...
Targeted Areas of Support    • Academic Support    • Career Development    • Multicultural education/programming    • Serv...
Fast Facts•History: Began in 1992 by the Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA)to support African American, Hispanic/Latino...
Who are MAPP Mentees?• 165 Domestic (US) and International  Freshmen - African  American, Hispanic/Latinos, Native  Americ...
MAPPMAPP (Mentoring Assistance Peer Program) focuses on thefirst year experience by supporting underrepresentedfreshmen at...
Who are the Mentors?• 40-45 upper classmen• Leaders on campus• Academically successful• Selected after a Group Interview a...
How are they paired?• Major• Online Questionnaires
Best Practices1. Bi-Monthly MAPP Mentor Meetings (Mandatory)2. Semester Program Evaluations3. Student Committees
#1: Mandatory MeetingsBi-Monthly Meetings•1st meeting of the month:  In-service training/Mentor-mentee attendance• 2nd mee...
#2: Evaluation• Interactions between mentors and mentees• Accessibility of Mentor• Mentee Participation• Programming Oppor...
#3: Student CommitteesCommittees: Must plan 1 large and 1 small scale event a semester   Targeted committees enhance progr...
Things to Consider1. Data Collection – It can be hard to get2. Faculty Buy-In for programming – Again, it can be hard to get
#1: Collecting Data  It can be hard because:• Students have short attention spans• Small return• Everything is now done on...
#2: Get Faculty Buy-InIt can be hard because:     •Faculty can be fickle, even if they want to get involved     •Faculty s...
Contact Information Michelle Wellman                            Shontay Delalue King Colorado State University            ...
CSO Webinar: The Power of Near-Peer Mentoring
CSO Webinar: The Power of Near-Peer Mentoring
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CSO Webinar: The Power of Near-Peer Mentoring

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This is a Center for Student Opportunity Best-Practices Webinar for College Partners titled "The Power of Near-Peer Mentoring: Supporting Your First-Generation and Underserved Students"

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CSO Webinar: The Power of Near-Peer Mentoring

  1. 1. Best-Practices Webinar Series The Power of Near-Peer Mentoring: Supporting your First Generation and Underserved Students
  2. 2. Panelists Joseph Colon Michelle Wellman Shontay Delalue KingModerator: Alexandra Economou Assistant Director of Director of Access Center Director of Intercultural CenterDirector of Partner Relations Multicultural Affairs Colorado State University Bryant UniversityCenter for Student Opportunity Johns Hopkins University
  3. 3. Colorado State University
  4. 4. The Dream ProjectA student-initiated high school outreach program that connectsCSU students with first-generation and low-income students inFort Collins area high schools to assist in the college admissionsprocess, including: SAT prep, applications, writingessays, applying for financial aid, and finding scholarships.
  5. 5. Dual Focus1. To give these college-bound high school students the assistance they may not receive at home or elsewhere2. To simultaneously teach CSU students about educational opportunity and social mobility and examine these ideas in the context of Colorado State University
  6. 6. Fast Facts•History: Began in 2008 under the leadership of Jim Rawlins; based on the model at University of Washington, Seattle•Optional participation•Response Rate: about 80% of eligible high school students participate•Mentor: Mentee Ratio – 1:2•Average Time Commitment: 2-4 hours/week
  7. 7. Who are Dream Scholars?•High school students attending Fort Collins area high schools•First-Generation, multicultural and/or underserved students•Must be nominated by high school counselors•66 scholars in 2011
  8. 8. Who is the Dream Team?• 34 Students currently enrolled at CSU• Students who have already demonstrated leadership on campus• Students who went through the program the previous year• Have successfully completed a background check• Gone through a rigorous application and interview process
  9. 9. How are they paired?Similarity in:1. Gender2. Ethnicity3. Life Experiences
  10. 10. Activities•Essay writing•SAT preparation classes•Signature events•Admissions weekends at CSU•1-on-1 with your CSU mentor
  11. 11. Best Practices1. Dream Team Training2. “For Students, By Students”3. Learning from Others
  12. 12. #1: Dream Team Training•A two-hour weekly class taught by Professor Blane Harding•Use a syllabus and workbook•Course Credit
  13. 13. Workbook & Syllabus
  14. 14. #2: For Students, By Students “We believe in providing vehicles for student leadership and engagement.”Created for students, by students:• 100% Volunteer• 95% Student-Run
  15. 15. Student Leadership Chart Classroom Community External High School Administration Expansion Interaction Development Communication Interaction• CSU Classroom • Think Tank • Social Events • Development • High School • Expansion into Lead Meetings • Communicate new high schools• TA Experience opportunities to • Chipotle • Partnerships engage through: Fridays • Coordinate High • Expansion into School Visits• Guest Speakers  Website • Newsletter Updates other universities • Volunteer• Articles  Announcements Opportunities • Budget • FAFSA Nights  Facebook • Promotional  E-mails Materials• Discussions • “Community-in- • Grant Writing • Scholar • Mentor waiting” Recruitment Recruitment• Workshops • Signature Events • Retreats
  16. 16. #3: Learning From Others Bringing the success of University of Washington to CSU CSU 2010 CSU 2011 UW 2010 Dream scholars 18 66 457 Dream team 14 35 207 High 1 school 2 school 16 schools & Schools/Programs programs Money Raised $0 $1,670 $351,000 Enrolled in Higher 12 TBD n/a Education Enrolled at CSU 6 TBD n/a
  17. 17. Things to Consider1. Recruitment as the Byproduct, Not the Goal2. Teaching Professionalism
  18. 18. #1: Recruitment as Byproduct NOT THE GOAL! Last year, one third of the Dream Scholars matriculated at CSU (6 of 18 students) BUT The Dream Team helps Dream Scholars attend ANY college of their choice. It is about what is right for the Scholar, not CSU.
  19. 19. #2: Teaching Professionalism 1. Attention to detail and specificity of thought and language 2. Prompt response to communication 3. Attendance that is both on-time and reliable
  20. 20. Bryant University
  21. 21. 4MILEA Peer Mentoring program for domestic and international students ofcolor designed to give them a ‘sense of belonging’ on a predominantlywhite campus. 4 – 4 years at Bryant University M – Multicultural I – International L – Leadership E – Experience
  22. 22. Four PillarsC - CultureA – AcademicsP – Personal GrowthS – Social Development
  23. 23. Who are the Mentees? 125 first year students who represent various cultural backgrounds.The program is required for international students and strongly recommended for domestic students of color.
  24. 24. Who are the Mentors?• 32 Current Bryant University students• Completed Application• Successful interview process• Many are graduates of the program
  25. 25. Fast Facts• History: Founded 10 years ago, originally as an orientation for international students• Staffing: Intercultural Center Staff, student mentors, and volunteer faculty and staff from across campus• Mentor:Mentee Ratio – 1:5• Parent/Family Component: During the program week•Response Rate: Majority of people invited to attend do
  26. 26. Key Components • Mentor Hiring Process • Summer Outreach • Week-long intense program • Fall and Spring Activities • Year-long Mentoring
  27. 27. Best Practices1. Integrating International and Multicultural Students2. Requiring a Year-Long Commitment
  28. 28. #1: Integration • Shared experiences amongst underrepresented groups • Ability to address issues of race • Cost-Effectiveness relative to outcomesSource: At Home in the World: Bridging the Gap Between Internationalization andMulticultural Education by Christa L. Olson, Rhodri Evans, Robert Shoenberg, AmericanCouncil on Education, 2007.
  29. 29. #2: Requiring a Year•Address transition needs beyond the first week of school•Adequate time to build relationships between staff and students•Develop leaders for the upcoming year
  30. 30. Something to Consider • Hiring mentors with integrity • Dispelling the ‘Clique’ MythRecommended Reading:“Why are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?”: And Other Conversations About Raceby Beverly Daniel Tatum
  31. 31. Johns Hopkins University
  32. 32. MAPPMAPP (Mentoring Assistance Peer Program) focuses on thefirst year experience by supporting underrepresentedfreshmen at Hopkins. The program is designed to enhanceand develop underrepresented students through severallevels of involvement.
  33. 33. Targeted Areas of Support • Academic Support • Career Development • Multicultural education/programming • Service Learning/Community Service • Social programming
  34. 34. Fast Facts•History: Began in 1992 by the Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA)to support African American, Hispanic/Latinos, Asians, and NativeAmericans and improve retention• Optional Participation•Mentor: Mentee Ratio: 1:5• Oversight: Leadership Team (5 Veterans) and Assistant Director
  35. 35. Who are MAPP Mentees?• 165 Domestic (US) and International Freshmen - African American, Hispanic/Latinos, Native American, and Asian/Pacific Islander, etc.• Made a 1 year commitment and participate in monthly programming (Social, Community Service, Cultural, Academic)
  36. 36. MAPPMAPP (Mentoring Assistance Peer Program) focuses on thefirst year experience by supporting underrepresentedfreshmen at Hopkins. The program is designed to enhanceand develop underrepresented students through severallevels of involvement.
  37. 37. Who are the Mentors?• 40-45 upper classmen• Leaders on campus• Academically successful• Selected after a Group Interview and then Individual Interviews• Trained on diversity topics and effective counseling
  38. 38. How are they paired?• Major• Online Questionnaires
  39. 39. Best Practices1. Bi-Monthly MAPP Mentor Meetings (Mandatory)2. Semester Program Evaluations3. Student Committees
  40. 40. #1: Mandatory MeetingsBi-Monthly Meetings•1st meeting of the month: In-service training/Mentor-mentee attendance• 2nd meeting of the month: Business meeting/Cohort Family programming development
  41. 41. #2: Evaluation• Interactions between mentors and mentees• Accessibility of Mentor• Mentee Participation• Programming Opportunities• Overall value of MAPP• Suggestions for improvement Conducted at the end of every semester
  42. 42. #3: Student CommitteesCommittees: Must plan 1 large and 1 small scale event a semester Targeted committees enhance programming opportunities • Social Programming Committee • Diversity Committee • Academic Committee • Community Service Committee • Selections Committee
  43. 43. Things to Consider1. Data Collection – It can be hard to get2. Faculty Buy-In for programming – Again, it can be hard to get
  44. 44. #1: Collecting Data It can be hard because:• Students have short attention spans• Small return• Everything is now done onlineIt helps to:• Keep questions short and sweet• Measure their engagement (eg. How many MAPP programs have you attended?)• Create an incentive program for returns (eg. Catered dinner for cohort family)• Though online is easiest, have hard-copy evaluations available• Give immediate feedback to mentors (They can improve tactics immediately)
  45. 45. #2: Get Faculty Buy-InIt can be hard because: •Faculty can be fickle, even if they want to get involved •Faculty schedule does not coincide with student schedules • Faculty need expectations in writing It can help to: • Get student references for dynamic faculty • Invite new faculty involved • Keep your requests small
  46. 46. Contact Information Michelle Wellman Shontay Delalue King Colorado State University Bryant University Director of Access Center Director of Intercultural Center michelle.wellman@colostate.edu sdelalue@bryant.edu (970) 988-4569 (401) 232-6448 Alexandra Economou Joseph Colon Center for Student Opportunity Johns Hopkins University Director of Partner Relations & Outreach Assistant Director, Multicultural Affairs aeconomou@csopportunity.org colon@jhu.edu (301) 363-4226 (410) 516-8730

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