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Critical Information Literacy in
Computer Science (CSS) and
Technology
Caitlan Maxwell
University of Washington Bothell/Ca...
What’s in the literature?
Feminist theories of gender and technology:
“A core concern of the women’s movement since its
in...
Possibilities?
• CSS curriculum and education:
• Women in STEM
• Topics in Computing
• Tech companies are under scrutiny f...
Challenges?
• Similar challenges to other professional degrees:
• Relationship with CSS department
• Not every school has ...
Works cited
• Wajcman, J. (2007). From Women and Technology to Gendered Technoscience.
Information, Communication & Societ...
Critical Information Literacy in
Careers/Career Services
Caitlan Maxwell
University of Washington Bothell/Cascadia College...
What’s in the literature?
• Not much literature on critical approaches to career studies/services
• Career centers are int...
Challenges?
• Transition from college to
professional life
• Student activism can work for
or against students in the
prof...
Possibilities
• Collaborate with career services (as well as other
services) on campus
• Career fairs
• Workshops:
• Resea...
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Critical Information Literacy in Computer Science/ Career

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Presentation at ACRL 2017

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Critical Information Literacy in Computer Science/ Career

  1. 1. Critical Information Literacy in Computer Science (CSS) and Technology Caitlan Maxwell University of Washington Bothell/Cascadia College Campus Library
  2. 2. What’s in the literature? Feminist theories of gender and technology: “A core concern of the women’s movement since its inception has been women’s limited access to scientific and technical institutions and professions” (Wajcman, 2007, 288). Intersectional Black Feminist Technology Studies: Critical theories have challenged the neoliberal narratives that claim the Internet is the key to social liberation and empowerment. These critiques have done little, however, to examine how the “complex, global patterns of capital that build the material infrastructures of the information and communications revolution at the expense of Black life diasporically.” (Noble, 2016, 1). Austin Kleon (2007). lady justice/no border. Flickr.
  3. 3. Possibilities? • CSS curriculum and education: • Women in STEM • Topics in Computing • Tech companies are under scrutiny for lack of diversity • Intellectual property • Algorithms and the myth of neutrality • Community engagement--coding for social justice
  4. 4. Challenges? • Similar challenges to other professional degrees: • Relationship with CSS department • Not every school has a dedicated CSS liaison (the CSS liaison may have other subject areas) • Limited time with students • Undergraduate curriculum is skills based and linear • Most writing classes focus on technical writing/corporate writing • Very few courses that examine technology and society Wiredforlego (2013). LEGO Collectible Minifigures Series 6 : Lady Liberty. Flickr.
  5. 5. Works cited • Wajcman, J. (2007). From Women and Technology to Gendered Technoscience. Information, Communication & Society, 10(3), 287-298. • Noble, S. (2016). A Future for Intersectional Black Feminist Technology Studies. The Scholar & Feminist Online: Traversing Technologies. Published by the Barnard Center for Research on Women. 13.3-14.1, 1-2.
  6. 6. Critical Information Literacy in Careers/Career Services Caitlan Maxwell University of Washington Bothell/Cascadia College Campus Library
  7. 7. What’s in the literature? • Not much literature on critical approaches to career studies/services • Career centers are integrating ‘value’ work into curriculum: • Working with students to identify their personal values and locating employers that match those values • Some literature around information literacy and professional skills: • Project Information Literacy • Business IL and professional skills (Jason Sokoloff, Head Foster Business Library)
  8. 8. Challenges? • Transition from college to professional life • Student activism can work for or against students in the professional world • Corporate world doesn’t usually provide space for discussions on equity, diversity, and social justice topics RJ Matson. (2006). “Lady Justice Joins the Corporate Board” The St. Louis Post Dispatch.
  9. 9. Possibilities • Collaborate with career services (as well as other services) on campus • Career fairs • Workshops: • Researching corporate culture: • Mark Bieraugel--NDLC presentation • Provided a collaborative workshop on researching corporate cultures with the institution’s PRIDE Center and EOP staff • Career resources: • Include nonprofits/for-profits and social justice • Careers in community organizing Photo: @AltStatLiberty/Twitter

Presentation at ACRL 2017

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