Evocative Pedagogy Bricolage Curriculum Common Core

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IAEA 2013 Conference Presentation by Olivia Gude

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Evocative Pedagogy Bricolage Curriculum Common Core

  1. 1. with thoughts on Common Core and Next Generation Standards a presentation by Olivia Gude
  2. 2. ↳ On  what  basis  do  we  make  decisions   about  what  to  include  and  what  to  leave   out  of  today’s  art  curriculum? 😳 ↳ One  can’t  answer  this  question  any   longer  by  simply  saying,  “We  include the  basics,  the  fundamentals.” ↳ Because......
  3. 3. ↳ Because...... ↳ For  at  least  30  years  there  have  been   😳 many  knowledgeable  people  in  the  world   of  art  and  art  education  who  believe  that   focusing  on  elements  and  principles,   traditional  media  and  realist  drawing/ painting  is  not  a  sufficient  introduction  to   the  complexities  of  artistic  practice  in   today’s  global  societies.  
  4. 4. ↳ The  field  of  art  education  must  change. ↳ Because...... 😳 ↳ There  is  no  guarantee  that art  education  will  be  considered  an   important  aspect  of  contemporary   schooling  if  we  do  not  create  a  field  that   is  perceived  as  relevant  to  contemporary   cultural  and  educational  concerns.  
  5. 5. People  gain  insights  into  the  meanings   of  artworks  by  analyzing   subject  matter,   formal  and  structural  characteristics,   contextual  information,   the  use  of  media  and   various  art  making  approaches. 😳 Draft: Enduring Understanding––Next Generation Core Visual Art Standards
  6. 6. People  gain  insights  into  the  meanings   of  artworks  =y  analyzing   b TEXT subject  matter formal  and  structural context the  use  of  media  and   genres,  styles,                   approaches. 😳                  
  7. 7. Structuring understand  and  interpret the art education curriculum on TEXT art traditions academic and modernist does not give students the range of knowledge and skills NEEDED tthe  goals  of  contemporary  education   Common  Core
  8. 8. The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. .....
  9. 9. ....the Standards also lay out a vision of what it means to be a literate person in the twenty-first century. Indeed, the skills and understandings students are expected to demonstrate have wide applicability outside the classroom or workplace.
  10. 10. Students who meet the Standards readily undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works .... They actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews. They reflexively demonstrate the cogent reasoning and use of evidence that is essential to both private deliberation and responsible citizenship in a democratic republic.
  11. 11. Students who meet the Standards readily undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works .... They actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality artistic and informational texts that literary builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews. They reflexively demonstrate the cogent reasoning and use of evidence that is essential to both private deliberation and responsible citizenship in a democratic republic.
  12. 12. Common Core mandates focus on results rather than means an integrated model of literacy research and media skills blended into standards as a whole Shared responsibility for students’ literacy development
  13. 13. Shared Responsibility includes all teachers
  14. 14. Shared Responsibility includes art teachers all
  15. 15. visual culture visual literacy an integrated model of literacy research and media skills blended into standards as a whole ART DESIGN
  16. 16. Evocative & Provocative Pedagogy: to lead the child to lead the community
  17. 17. Evocative to call forth to bring to mind
  18. 18. Evocative & Provocative to arouse to feeling to arouse to action
  19. 19. Evocative & Provocative Pedagogy
  20. 20. ↳ Reach  students  “where  they  live.” 😳
  21. 21. What does this sign mean? a) pedestrians ahead warning b) pedestrians only–no vehicles c) school advance warning d) couples with boxes crossing
  22. 22. What does this sign mean? a) flagger ahead b) how to hold stinky things c) start driving really fast NOW d) pointing to doorway in the distance xxthat leads to another dimension
  23. 23. Mapping Curriculum
  24. 24. On  what  basis  do  we  decide?↴ ↱affective    evidence emotions,  sensations,  inklings   ↱cognitive    reasoning intellectual    explanations  
  25. 25. ↱affective    evidence emotions,  sensations,  inklings
  26. 26. blindfolded kids
  27. 27. 😳
  28. 28. 😳
  29. 29. computer
  30. 30. affective: spirit,  body    and    heart    justifications ↱cognitive    reasoning intellectual    explanations  
  31. 31. What  is  the  criteria  of  selection? Ask  2  questions:
  32. 32. ↳ Does  this  curriculum  support  students   in  engaging    and  making  personally   satisfying  and  meaningful  works  of  art,   craft  and  design? 😳
  33. 33. ↳ Does  this  curriculum  adequately   represent  a  range  of  the  art,resources, aesthetic  practices  and  cultural  concerns in  this  society  at  this  time? 😳
  34. 34. ↱What  methods?   ↱What  models? ↳What  projects?  
  35. 35. ↳What  is  a  project? ↳What  does  a  project  “do”?
  36. 36. ↳ Criteria  for  quality  projects  
  37. 37. ↳ Criteria  for  quality  projects   ↳ Value  engaging  in  authentic  artistic  processes  over                                               making  facsimiles.   ↳ Value  contemporary  practices  of  a  medium,                     over  curriculum  that  merely  recapitulates  the                     history  of  the  medium. ↳      Value  utilizing  skills,  forms,  and  vocabulary  in                     actual  contexts  over  de-­‐contextualized  exercises                     and  recipes.   ↳      Value:  investigating  over  symbolizing.  
  38. 38. ↳ What  does  a  good  project  do? ↳ Introduces  students  to  methods  of  making 😳              complexity  of  the  discipline ↳ Creates  opportunities  for  students  to  make  meaning              needs  of  students  and  communities
  39. 39. ↳ What  does  a  good  project  do? ↳ Introduces  students  to  methods  of  making 😳              complexity  of  the  discipline ↳ Creates  opportunities  for  students  to  make  meaning              needs  of  students  and  communities
  40. 40. projects= vehicles  of  aesthetic  investigation vehicles  of  artistic  investigation 😳 encode    methods of  experiencing   of  engaging of  exploring   of  making   of  generating  knowledge/insight of  being  in  the  world
  41. 41. artistic  practices vehicles  of  aesthetic  investigation vehicles  of  artistic  investigation 😳 encode    methods of  experiencing   of  engaging of  exploring   of  making   of  generating  knowledge/insight of  being  in  the  world
  42. 42. artistic  practice=an  artist’s  practice What  do  we  mean  by  artistic  practice? An  artist’s  practice  not  only  suggests  the   techniques  or  media  an  artist  uses  to  create  art,   but  also  fundamentally  the  artist’s   conceptual  approach  or  method  by  which  he  or  she   goes  about  making  art.   😳 the  warhol:  resources  and  lessons teaching  across  the  arts  and  humanities
  43. 43. Olivia  Gude’s  collaborative  public  art U.S.  street  art  movement–values  of  community Mexican  muralists–wall  composition community  arts–oral  history/storytelling   postmodern  text/image  art   collaborative,  socially  engaged  art  practices traditional  mosaics  tesslelation–form modernist  mosaics  tesselation–flatness 😳
  44. 44. OMG  omg 😳 Cannas  &  Corn:  a  Garden  Community,  2004 by  Olivia  Gude  &  community  residents
  45. 45. OMG  omg 😳
  46. 46. OMG  omg 😳
  47. 47. 😳
  48. 48. OMG  omg 😳
  49. 49. OMG  omg 😳
  50. 50. collaborative    art    practice generates  a  space  that  others  can  enter,   not  just  as  viewers,  but  as  participants. 😳 The  artist  can  utilize  this  artistic  practice  with   others  to  identify  content,  investigate  and   make. The  artist  puts  into  play  an  approach,  a   method  that  can  take  the  work  in  as  yet   unknown  directions.
  51. 51. project  =  borrowed  artistic  practice generates  a  space  that  others  can  enter,   not  just  as  viewers,  but  as  participants. 😳 I  can  utilize  this  artistic  practice  with  others   to  identify  content,  investigate  and  make. An  approach,  a  method,  is  put  into  play that  can  take  the  work  in  as  yet   unknown  directions.
  52. 52. Art  teachers  (Artist/teachers)  develop   vehicles  of  artistic  investigation  = projects. 😳 Paradoxically, students  both  inhabit  these  projects, these  capacities  for  experiencing  and  making, and  they  internalize  these  capacities.
  53. 53. How  can  we  build  high  quality vehicles  of  artistic  investigation  = projects? 😳 What  is  relevant  to  this  project,   to  this  practice  of  experiencing  and  making?     conceptual historical cultural   aesthetic     technical experiential behavioral
  54. 54. Mapping Curriculum On  what  basis  do  we  choose  projects  or sequences  of  projects? How  do  we  decide  which  vehicles  of   aesthetic  investigation  are  needed?   ANSWER   1
  55. 55. 😳 It  often  works  best  to  introduce artistic  practices  through  sequences  of  projects   that  develop  sensibilities, build  skills,  situate  within  historical  contexts   and  draw  out  cultural  implications.   Projects  are  not  mere  Exercises. Projects  have  intrinsic  value.       Projects:  individual  or  collaborative  enterprise  planned  and  designed  to  achieve  an  aim.
  56. 56. Expressionist    Self-­‐Portrait What  would  students  need  to  understand  and   be  able  to  do  in  order  to  make  an   expressionist  self-­‐portrait?  
  57. 57. Find  Your  Mark! (De)Generate  Painting   Spiral  Workshop  2009 😳
  58. 58. Wassily Kandinsky Composition IV 1911
  59. 59. Franz Kline Untitled 1952
  60. 60. MOVE THE PAINT! Rapidly take responsibility for the entire surface. Some of required activities in the painting exercises: Paint with the brush in your non-dominant hand. Paint standing as far away as possible from the easel . Paint as if you have no joints in your arm. Paint with your brush in a fist that is placed under your chin.
  61. 61. Abstract  Expressionism (De)Generate  Painting   Spiral  Workshop  2009 😳
  62. 62. At a certain moment the canvas began to appear to one American painter after another as an arena in which to act. What was to go on the canvas was not a picture, but an event. Harold Rosenburg, art critic
  63. 63. Jackson Pollock
  64. 64. Joan Mitchell Untitled 1956
  65. 65. Free  Form  Color  Investigation (De)Generate  Painting   Spiral  Workshop  2009 😳
  66. 66. Degenerating  Vegetable  Matter (De)Generate  Painting   Spiral  Workshop  2009 😳
  67. 67. Max Beckman Still Life with Helmet and Red Feather 1944
  68. 68. Gabrielle Munter Madonna with Poinsettas 1911
  69. 69. Denice Rinks Pears 1990
  70. 70. Giorgio de Chirico
  71. 71. Facial  Anatomy  Lesson (De)Generate  Painting   Spiral  Workshop  2009 😳
  72. 72. Expressive  Faces  Lesson (De)Generate  Painting   Spiral  Workshop  2009 😳
  73. 73. Chiaroscuro  Portraits  from  Life (De)Generate  Painting   Spiral  Workshop  2009 😳
  74. 74. Chiaroscuro–strong darks and lights create form
  75. 75. The Blinding of Samson by Rembrandt van Rijn, 1636
  76. 76. The NIghtmare by Henry Fuseli, 1781
  77. 77. Film still from The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari, directed by Robert Wiene, 1920
  78. 78. Film Noir
  79. 79. Sin City comic by Frank Miller, 1991
  80. 80. Expressionist  Self-­‐Portrait (De)Generate  Painting   Spiral  Workshop  2009 😳
  81. 81. Gilbert Stuart Portrait of George Washington
  82. 82. John Singer Sargent Vernon Lee
  83. 83. Egon Schiele Self Portrait 1912
  84. 84. Gabrielle Munter Meditation 1917
  85. 85. Victor Brauner Self Portrait with Plucked Eye 1931
  86. 86. Max Beckman
  87. 87. Emil Nolde
  88. 88. Lucian Freud Francis Bacon 1952
  89. 89. Frank Auerbach Portrait of Juliet Yardley Mills II 1984
  90. 90. Francis Bacon Self-Portrait 1971
  91. 91. Jean Michel Basquiat Untitled 1981
  92. 92. Chris Mars A Soother for Trudy 2007
  93. 93. Jenny Saville Rosetta 2006
  94. 94. Expressionist Self-Portrait (De)Generate Painting S
  95. 95. Mapping Curriculum On  what  basis  do  we  choose  projects  or sequences  of  projects? How  do  we  decide  which  vehicles  of   aesthetic  investigation  are  needed?   ANSWER   2
  96. 96. Neatness does not count. It  is  not  possible  to  develop  21st  century   curriculum  in  matching  sets.   Each  unit  is  an  element  or  principle.  Each  unit  introduces  a  different  media. Each  unit  is  based  on  a  period  in  art  history.
  97. 97. 😳 ↱ needs  of  students  and  communities   ↱ complexity  of  the  discipline
  98. 98. Principles  of  Possibility playing forming  self investigating  community  themes encountering  others attentive  living   designing  life empowered  experiencing empowered  making deconstructing  culture reconstructing  social  spaces elaborating  fantasies not  knowing
  99. 99. 😳 ↱ needs  of  students  and  communities   ↱ complexity  of  the  discipline
  100. 100. Liminality Complexity Ambiguity Hybridity Fluidity Uncertainty Paradox
  101. 101. The  disciplinary  strength  of  such  a  frame  is  its   acknowledgment  of  the  complex,  contradictory,   ever-­‐evolving  nature  of  artistic  practices.   curriculum
  102. 102. comprehensive curriculum
  103. 103. comprehensive insurance
  104. 104. What if a tree fell on your car? Will your insurance plan cover it?
  105. 105. What if a hail storm dents your car? Will your insurance plan cover it?
  106. 106. What if a giant inflatable sculpture landed on your car? Will your insurance plan cover it?
  107. 107. What if a giant inflatable sculpture of dog poo is in the news? Will your aesthetic understanding plan cover it?
  108. 108. What if an important artist deliberately destroys ancient urns? Will your aesthetic plan cover damage to your students’ belief in art?
  109. 109. Bricolage: 1.      a  construction  made  of  whatever  materials  are  at  hand;              something  created  from  a  variety  of  available  things. 😳 2.      a  piece  created  from  diverse  resources.
  110. 110. OMG  omg 😳 La Maison Picassiette, 1938-1964 by Raymonde Isadore
  111. 111. OMG  omg 😳
  112. 112. Bricolage  and  Bricoleur   has  a  long  history  in  theory,  including  in.... ↳  Subculture:  the  Meaning  of  Style  by  Dick  Hebdige  (1979)   which  identifies  the  repurposing  of  existing  objects  by  punks   as  a  form  of  “semiotic  guerilla  warfare”  against  the   dominant  culture.   😳
  113. 113. Bricolage  and  Bricoleur   has  a  long  history  in  theory,  also  including  in.... ↳  Handbook  of  Qualitative  Research  edited  by  Norman   Denzin  and  Yvonna  Lincoln  (2006)  to   “denote  a  multi-­‐methodological  form  of  research  that  uses   a  variety  of  research  methods  and  theoretical  constructs  to   examine  a  phenomenon.” 😳
  114. 114. Bricoleur: the  (w0)man  who  works  with  any  tools  at  hand 😳 Bricoleur  Art  Teacher: the  (w0)man  who  surveys  art  and  culture  and  chooses   those  tools  (cultural  theory  and  artistic  practices)  that   meets  the  needs  of  students  and  their  communities  by   providing  access  to  a  wide  range  of  interpretive  and   meaning  making  strategies.  
  115. 115. free  form  color  investigation  FIR
  116. 116. “Seeing  Into”  Surrealist  Survey Uncharted  Territories  of  the  Mind 😳 Bureau  of  Misdirection Spiral  Workshop  Office  of  Aesthetic  Investigation,  2011
  117. 117. Sensory  Senseless  Mapping Agency  of  Recollection Spiral  Workshop  2009 😳
  118. 118. Guide to the Psychogeography of Paris Guy Debord Situationist International
  119. 119. Vito Acconci Following Piece 1969
  120. 120. Abramovic & Ulay Relation in Time 1977 Marina Abramovic The Great Wall Walk 1988
  121. 121. Gabriel Orozco Yielding Stone 1992
  122. 122. Francis Alys Sometimes Making Something Leads to Northing 2009
  123. 123. Richard Long A Line Made by Walking 1969
  124. 124. Richard Long Sixty Minute Circle Walk on Dartmoor 1984
  125. 125. Yukinori Yanagi Wandering Position 1996
  126. 126. Making  Faces Liminality:  Alternative  Practices Spiral  Workshop  2010 😳
  127. 127. Bruce Nauman Self-Portrait as Fountain 1966-1967
  128. 128. Hannah Wilke S.O.S. Curlers 1975
  129. 129. Social  Situations Liminality:  Alternative  Practices Spiral  Workshop  2010 😳
  130. 130. add artists Cindy Sherman
  131. 131. add artists Charlie White Cocktail Party from the Understanding Joshua series 1991
  132. 132. Liminality - What is a social situation? An event where you interact with one or more persons. Check all the social situations you have been a part of: Surprise Party Graduation Party School Dance/Prom Baptism Extended Family Party (Family Reunion, etc.) Quinceañera Bar/Bat Mitzvah Birthday Party Wedding Name: Slumber Party Parent-Teacher/School Conference Liminality - What is a social situation? An event where you interact with one or more persons. Pizza Party Check all the social situations you have been a part of: School Tournament (Debate Team, Sports, etc.) Surprise Party Family Vacation Graduation Party Classroom Party School Dance/Prom Funeral Baptism Sporting Event (Spectator or Participant) Party etc.) Extended Family Party (Family Reunion, w/ Parents Quinceañera Party w/o Parents Bar/Bat Mitzvah Birthday Party What other types of social situations have you been a part of? Wedding Slumber Party Parent-Teacher/School Conference Pizza Party School Tournament (Debate Team, Sports, etc.) Family Vacation Classroom Party Funeral Sporting Event (Spectator or Participant) Party w/ Parents Party w/o Parents
  133. 133. Mapping Curriculum Bricolage Curriculum ↱ needs  of  students  and  communities                interrelated  with/supported  by   ↱

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