Marketing Your Library<br />Heroes, Tips & Tools                            to Promote Libraries and Resources<br />
We Share the Challenge<br />Today’s economy, and evolving roles for libraries and librarians, mean doing more with much le...
 Goals of this Session<br />Prepare you to increase awareness of the value of your library and its online resources by cov...
            One Second on “Marketing”<br />Means using strategies to move products or services from the producer to consum...
Create or provide the products/services that each group wants
Publicize or promote product/services so groups know you offer what they want
Evaluate for customer satisfaction… use feedback to enhance/expand your offerings.  Repeat process. </li></li></ul><li>   ...
User Needs Hero:Brian Mathews<br />Champion of user       experience, library design-thinking at Georgia Tech, now at UC/S...
Customer Behavior Hero:Anastasia Goodstein<br />	Youth marketing expert focused on new media<br />	Blog: Ypulse<br />Artic...
Next, Segment Customers<br />Columbus Metropolitan Library<br />   Used customer observation study to track behavior, then...
Segmentation and Branding Hero:Alison Circle<br />	CML’s director of marketing<br /> 	Formerly with Jack Morton Worldwide ...
            Plan How to Reach Segments<br />What are the most critical user groups for the success of your library?<br />C...
How can you build a better capability to reach to each group?
What are the key points/messages for each group.</li></li></ul><li>             For Each User Segment…<br />Set objectives...
Basic Approaches: Push/Pull<br />To push your message out to customers, choose such tactics as:<br />--Publicity<br />--Ad...
Push: Timing is Key<br />Farmington (MI) Community Library<br />Friends of the Library send member outreach mailings at ho...
            Pull: for Long-Term Results<br />Pull customers closer to  further inform and engage:<br />-- Website, blogs<b...
 Pull: Use Site to Start Conversation<br />The University of Toledo Libraries<br />polls students on aspects of library us...
Define Objectives and Measure<br />Optimum to set goals, measure progress toward strategic plan<br />Measuring can be as s...
Define Objectives and Measure<br />Bloomington (IL) Public Library<br />One of many to use Individual ROI Calculator for p...
“When you’re low on money…<br />“… marketing is one of the last things you should cut from your budget.”<br />- Kathy Demp...
“True Marketing” Hero:Kathy Dempsey<br />Library marketing consultant, firm is <br />Libraries Are Essential<br />Editor, ...
Think out of the box<br />Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library -- Job Search Kit<br />
Partnerships Work<br />Camden (NJ) County Library System<br />partners with SCORE – Service Corps of Retired Executives – ...
              Social Media: Ask Teens to Help<br />Penguin UK recruited teens to build its site on “the life inside books”...
ProQuest Marketing Toolkits<br />Versions for academic, public, K-12, corporate, and military libraries--on www.proquest.c...
Advice from the How-to Guides                      Evaluate Your Library’s Website<br /><ul><li>Is your URL easy to rememb...
Easy navigation from school’s home page?
Easy remote access?
Add a search bar/widget
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Marketing Your Library: Heroes, Tips & Tools to Promote Libaries and Resources

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Lynda James-Gilboe, ProQuest
ILA 2009 Annual Conference

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  • (talk through bullets)What do you need? MARKETINGRe: last bullet… we’ll touch on a range of library types today. I’ll use the terms ‘customer’… ‘user’… ‘patron’… and ‘student’, please know that they all refer to our marketing target.Technically, someone becomes a “customer” when they visit your library more than once. Until then, they’re a prospective customer or “prospect”
  • [talk through bullets]
  • [Talk thru bullet points]You could jump in at the “promote” stage of the process, but it won’t be as effective as when you start from the top. Marketing professionals find it extremely helpful to create a plan, and then work the plan.
  • [talk thru slide]—need to add a bit more on conclusions/how usedThe DNA Project was the passion of user experience librarian Brian Mathews, who recently moved from Georgia to UC/Santa Barbara [change slide]
  • [add a bit more color about Brian and his passion, any results]
  • If you’re a school librarian or media specialist, to reach students you need to be where they are: on social media. Anastasia Goodstein has some great insights on tweens and teens as customers. She is author of the Ypulse blog, which chronicles areas where marketing and popular teen culture overlap—that’s a very specialized area and Forbes magazine named it “Best of the Web”. She wrote a great article last year for School Library Journal, and was keynote speaker for the Michigan Library Association.
  • http://www.libraryjournal.com/flashVideo/element_id/2140319089/taxid/33552.html
  • Use techniques such as publicity (news releases to local community or campus media—low cost, labor only. Have others promote an event or service for youadvertising (in vehicles most targeted to your community), but always with a “call to action” promoting something specific for readers to do to come to the library or your websiteevents (get them inside with something fun)
  • At holiday and tax-prep time, people are rightly budget conscious… but they still can be convinced to join or renew their Friends of the Library membership.The Farmington (Michigan) Community Library sends a simple letter with a direct appeal for membership, highlighting the ways the library helps people--especially during a tight economy. They normally just include a reply envelope that also lists Friends benefits.Recently, someone donated a number of autographed books, and the Library used them in a raffle to encourage response within a two-week period. Both the renewal mailing and the new-member solicitation saw several hundred immediate replies, and with these two mailings the Library increased Friends membership from 900 to 1400 members (even with an increase in membership dues).
  • Once you have your broad objectives identified, it’s time to turn them into a marketing plan.
  • cite the source of the ROI calculator. It originally comes from Chelmsford Public Library in Massachusetts. Brian Herzog developed it and then the Maine State Library reformatted it and cleaned it up in 2006.
  • Describe contents of job search kitAlso mention example from Sioux City Library – Letter Promoting Job Search Resources. Bring letter to the library and they waive all fines.
  • http://www.spinebreakers.co.uk/Pages/Home.aspxEnlist teens to manage your social media. Even if your library already has its own Web site or page, have them set up a MySpace profile or create a Facebook page for your library. Students can also help you upload videos and photos, or add widgets and other Web applications. The U.K. division of Penguin Books has taken things one step further: it has recruited kids between the ages of 13 and 18 to run its new teen Web site, Spinebreakers.
  • Not just the templates in downloadable Word format, but also directions on how to get materials in hands of the media
  • Marketing Your Library: Heroes, Tips & Tools to Promote Libaries and Resources

    1. 1. Marketing Your Library<br />Heroes, Tips & Tools to Promote Libraries and Resources<br />
    2. 2. We Share the Challenge<br />Today’s economy, and evolving roles for libraries and librarians, mean doing more with much less<br />Today’s student – the digital native – defaults to the open Web for research<br />Many adults (and jobseekers) unaware of the range of services that libraries offer<br />Need targeted, high-impact, low-cost ways to reach and engage customers/users<br />
    3. 3. Goals of this Session<br />Prepare you to increase awareness of the value of your library and its online resources by covering:<br />How various marketing approaches can work together to attract and engage users<br />Tools to educate users about library databases – how they are more reliable and comprehensive than free Web<br />
    4. 4. One Second on “Marketing”<br />Means using strategies to move products or services from the producer to consumer<br />Marketing is a process…<br /><ul><li>Study customers (current and prospective), segment into groups, ask groups what they want from you
    5. 5. Create or provide the products/services that each group wants
    6. 6. Publicize or promote product/services so groups know you offer what they want
    7. 7. Evaluate for customer satisfaction… use feedback to enhance/expand your offerings. Repeat process. </li></li></ul><li> First, Study Customer Needs<br />Georgia Institute of Technology DNA Project: <br />“Decoding” the library user experience through weekly user interviews that reveal why some become regular library users and others don’t:<br />Why do they use the library? What triggers usage?<br />What need is being filled?<br />Once they’ve discovered something, did they use it again? Did they tell others about it?”<br />Identifying user patterns sets stage for marketing planning.<br />
    8. 8. User Needs Hero:Brian Mathews<br />Champion of user experience, library design-thinking at Georgia Tech, now at UC/Santa Barbara<br />Author, Marketing Today’s Academic Library <br />ALA Edition, 2009<br />Articles: American Libraries, Library Journal, C&RL News<br />Blogs: Ubiquitous Librarian; Designing Better Libraries<br /> www.brianmathews.com<br />
    9. 9. Customer Behavior Hero:Anastasia Goodstein<br /> Youth marketing expert focused on new media<br /> Blog: Ypulse<br />Article: School Library Journal May 2008<br /> Keynote: Michigan Library Assoc 2007<br /> Author, Totally Wired: What Teens & Tweens are Really Doing Online St. Martin’s Press 2007<br />
    10. 10. Next, Segment Customers<br />Columbus Metropolitan Library<br /> Used customer observation study to track behavior, then cluster analysis to segment into “personas” to inform marketing strategy<br />
    11. 11. Segmentation and Branding Hero:Alison Circle<br /> CML’s director of marketing<br /> Formerly with Jack Morton Worldwide branding (on Target account); Minnesota Public Radio, marketing Prairie Home Companion<br /> Blog:<br /> Bubble Room Library Journal <br />
    12. 12. Plan How to Reach Segments<br />What are the most critical user groups for the success of your library?<br />Create your own “personas” <br />For each group…<br /><ul><li>How do your user support capabilities stack up versus their expectations?
    13. 13. How can you build a better capability to reach to each group?
    14. 14. What are the key points/messages for each group.</li></li></ul><li> For Each User Segment…<br />Set objectives that can be measured<br />Identify the right tactics from your toolbox<br />Events/Activities Social Networking <br />Signs/Decorations Facebook, Twitter, etc. <br />Newsletters/Blogs <br />Press Releases <br />Print Advertisements<br />Radio<br />
    15. 15. Basic Approaches: Push/Pull<br />To push your message out to customers, choose such tactics as:<br />--Publicity<br />--Advertising & Promotion<br />--Events<br />Results are short-term, good for introducing new services, databases; recruiting Friends<br />
    16. 16. Push: Timing is Key<br />Farmington (MI) Community Library<br />Friends of the Library send member outreach mailings at holiday and tax time, and include time-based incentives … 2009<br />membership increased 40%<br />
    17. 17. Pull: for Long-Term Results<br />Pull customers closer to further inform and engage:<br />-- Website, blogs<br />-- Opt-in e-mail Newsletters, RSS feeds/Alerts <br />-- On-site promotion of collections/services/virtual library (fliers, posters, etc.)<br />-- How-to’s (database demos, user guides)<br />
    18. 18. Pull: Use Site to Start Conversation<br />The University of Toledo Libraries<br />polls students on aspects of library use and reports results weekly<br />
    19. 19. Define Objectives and Measure<br />Optimum to set goals, measure progress toward strategic plan<br />Measuring can be as simple as<br />Events: use registration process, send follow- up (inform about RSS feeds, alert system for further info). Count heads and opt-ins.<br />Promotions: drive response to website, use Google analytics, other free software to track response. <br />
    20. 20. Define Objectives and Measure<br />Bloomington (IL) Public Library<br />One of many to use Individual ROI Calculator for patrons to determine their view of library worth, measure customer satisfaction<br />
    21. 21. “When you’re low on money…<br />“… marketing is one of the last things you should cut from your budget.”<br />- Kathy Dempsey, Marketing Library Services Newsletter<br />May/June 2009<br />Five Ways Marketing Can Cut Costs<br />Use customer input to confidently determine which services to keep and which to cut<br />Use better marketing and promotion to tell folks about what you’ve already got<br />Save training time by creating quick tutorials or videos<br />Make your website work for all it’s worth<br />Lean more on your colleagues and consortia<br />
    22. 22. “True Marketing” Hero:Kathy Dempsey<br />Library marketing consultant, firm is <br />Libraries Are Essential<br />Editor, Information Today <br />Blogger, The ’M’ Word – Marketing Libraries<br />The Accidental Library Marketer<br />Information Today 2009<br />
    23. 23. Think out of the box<br />Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library -- Job Search Kit<br />
    24. 24. Partnerships Work<br />Camden (NJ) County Library System<br />partners with SCORE – Service Corps of Retired Executives – to mentor small businesses as part of its “Your Library, Your Lifeline” initiative<br />
    25. 25. Social Media: Ask Teens to Help<br />Penguin UK recruited teens to build its site on “the life inside books”—they named it Spinebreakers. <br />
    26. 26. ProQuest Marketing Toolkits<br />Versions for academic, public, K-12, corporate, and military libraries--on www.proquest.com<br />Detailed “How-to” Guides<br />
    27. 27. Advice from the How-to Guides Evaluate Your Library’s Website<br /><ul><li>Is your URL easy to remember?
    28. 28. Easy navigation from school’s home page?
    29. 29. Easy remote access?
    30. 30. Add a search bar/widget
    31. 31. Add some personality – and update often</li></li></ul><li>Advice from the How-to Guides Ask Users to Evaluate Your Site<br /><ul><li>How do different types of users the site?
    32. 32. Develop a survey/offer a suggestion box
    33. 33. Use what you learn… and ask for their help to implement</li></li></ul><li>Advice from the How-to Guides Be Where Your Users Are<br />Use social networks like MySpace, Facebook, Twitter; consider a blog.<br /><ul><li>Update your pages/status often with new content collection or service announcements
    34. 34. Keep your library events and happenings current
    35. 35. Offer an RSS feed or alert to make subscribers aware of updates</li></li></ul><li>Advice from the How-to Guides Using Publicity Tools<br />Make a media list of:<br /><ul><li>Campus and local newspaper(s)
    36. 36. Relevant e-newsletters
    37. 37. Local radio stations
    38. 38. Local TV stations & cable access</li></ul>Make them friends, keep them informed<br /> - Don’t just send releases…<br /> - Do invite for tours, events<br />
    39. 39. Advice from the How-to Guides Anyone Can Write a Good Release<br /><ul><li>Make it newsworthy
    40. 40. Connect your announcement with current events.
    41. 41. What’s unique about the new database? Why did the library spend the budget on it?
    42. 42. How will the database impact library users?
    43. 43. Incite a response with your headline – be bold!
    44. 44. State “the Five W’s” up front: Who, What, When, Where and Why
    45. 45. Include testimonials from faculty, students, fans. Quotes let reporters write a story that sounds like an interview without having to pick up the phone. </li></li></ul><li>Advice from the How-to Guides Using Print Ads, Radio Scripts<br />Plan your approach…<br /><ul><li>Get ad rates and editorial calendars from contacts on your media list
    46. 46. Use advertising & marketing students to help customize ads or radio scripts</li></ul>Place the ad or radio sponsorship…<br /><ul><li>Ask about free PSAs or bartering</li></ul>Track them… <br />- Measure database usage immediately after ads run<br />- Ask patrons, “Where did you hear about us?”<br />
    47. 47. Questions? Thank you.<br />

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