A presentation to  StartStrong : a children’s rights seminar on early and sustained support for children with a disability...
Attitudes to children, attitudes to disability and children’s rights <ul><li>The position of children in contemporary New ...
The social and economic position of children: some reflections
Three paradoxes <ul><li>We know poverty harms children - but they remain the group most likely to be in hardship </li></ul...
Childhood and poverty   Proportion of all individuals in low-income households by age Household Incomes in NZ: Trends and ...
Childhood and access to parents
Social disparities
In short, we have: <ul><li>Hardship within wealth </li></ul><ul><li>Poverty of time within families </li></ul><ul><li>Disp...
Three hypotheses <ul><li>Children are relatively invisible </li></ul><ul><li>Children carry little weight politically </li...
Children’s invisibility
Political weakness
Attitudes to children <ul><li>Children as ‘human becomings’ - the development view </li></ul><ul><li>Children as innocents...
A way ahead: children as citizens
Children as citizens: the new sociology of children <ul><li>Children as a unique social group with their own culture </li>...
Children as citizens Photographs of school children used with permission of Kawerau South School. Photo of mother and chil...
Children  with disabilities <ul><li>A children’s rights approach </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusive education </li></ul><ul><li>T...
A rights approach <ul><li>UN Convention on the Rights of the Child </li></ul><ul><li>UN Convention on the Rights of Person...
Inclusive education <ul><li>A rights focus? </li></ul>
The importance of attitudes
In conclusion…
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Attitudes To Children - Children’s Commissioner – Dr John Angus

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The IHC Childrens Rights Seminar on 23 March in Wellington which focused on Early and Sustained Support for Children with a Disability was a resounding success! Government and non-Government agencies, parents, advocates, and professionals from all sectors came together to discuss a range of issues facing children with a disability and their families in early life. The three presentations from the seminar can be accessed here and a further document stating IHC’s round up of the issues and plan for action will be released shortly.

IHC also announced the beginning of a new e-discussion group on this topic which received huge support, if you are interested in joining this group please email laura.o.donovan@ihc.org.nz indicating your interest and what you would like to get from this discussion group.

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Attitudes To Children - Children’s Commissioner – Dr John Angus

  1. 1. A presentation to StartStrong : a children’s rights seminar on early and sustained support for children with a disability Dr John Angus Children’s Commissioner Wellington, 22 March 2010 Attitudes to children, attitudes to disability and children’s rights
  2. 2. Attitudes to children, attitudes to disability and children’s rights <ul><li>The position of children in contemporary New Zealand </li></ul><ul><li>A children as citizens approach </li></ul><ul><li>Children with disabilities </li></ul>
  3. 3. The social and economic position of children: some reflections
  4. 4. Three paradoxes <ul><li>We know poverty harms children - but they remain the group most likely to be in hardship </li></ul><ul><li>We have smaller families - but children get less time from their parents </li></ul><ul><li>Social services have improved - but wide disparities remain </li></ul>
  5. 5. Childhood and poverty Proportion of all individuals in low-income households by age Household Incomes in NZ: Trends and indicators of inequality and hardship 1982-2008 (MSD 2009)
  6. 6. Childhood and access to parents
  7. 7. Social disparities
  8. 8. In short, we have: <ul><li>Hardship within wealth </li></ul><ul><li>Poverty of time within families </li></ul><ul><li>Disparities despite progress </li></ul>
  9. 9. Three hypotheses <ul><li>Children are relatively invisible </li></ul><ul><li>Children carry little weight politically </li></ul><ul><li>Some adult attitudes to children devalue them </li></ul>
  10. 10. Children’s invisibility
  11. 11. Political weakness
  12. 12. Attitudes to children <ul><li>Children as ‘human becomings’ - the development view </li></ul><ul><li>Children as innocents - the romantic view </li></ul><ul><li>Children as sinners - the fundamentalist view </li></ul>
  13. 13. A way ahead: children as citizens
  14. 14. Children as citizens: the new sociology of children <ul><li>Children as a unique social group with their own culture </li></ul><ul><li>Children as social actors capable of participating </li></ul><ul><li>Children as agents in their own lives not passive recipients </li></ul>
  15. 15. Children as citizens Photographs of school children used with permission of Kawerau South School. Photo of mother and child used with permission of the Families Commission.
  16. 16. Children with disabilities <ul><li>A children’s rights approach </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusive education </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of attitudes </li></ul>
  17. 17. A rights approach <ul><li>UN Convention on the Rights of the Child </li></ul><ul><li>UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>NZ Disability Strategy </li></ul>
  18. 18. Inclusive education <ul><li>A rights focus? </li></ul>
  19. 19. The importance of attitudes
  20. 20. In conclusion…

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