Start Strong: A Children’s Rights
Perspective on the IHC Action Plan
Janis Carroll-Lind
Principal Advisor (Education)
Star...
Office of the Children’s Commissioner
In the core functions of advocacy,
monitoring or investigation
matters, the Children...
Role and Function
of the Children’s Commissioner
• Established 1989 under the Children,
Young Persons and their Families A...
The Children’s Commissioner Act 2003
• Previously in Children, Young
Persons and their Families Act 1989
• Independent Cro...
Consultation with Children
The Children’s Commissioner
must also ensure that children
and young people are able to
speak o...
The rights of every child and young person are
recognised and each enjoys good health,
education, safety and economic well...
Key Outcome Goals for OCC
• Every child is safe and nurtured
• Every child has adequate
resources and opportunities to
dev...
United Nations Convention on the
Rights of the Child
Personal Photograph Used With Permission
• An international treaty th...
What does UNCROC say?
• Contains 54 articles spelling out children’s
rights
• Four groups of rights
– Survival
– Protectio...
UNCROC: Article 3
In all actions concerning
children, the best interests
of the child should be a
primary consideration.
P...
Relevant UNCROC Articles
Article 2 No discrimination
Article 3 Best interests of the child
Article 6 Survival and developm...
Child
Home
Parents
Family
Education
Setting
Staff
Peers
Dual Socialisation Butterfly (Sommer, 2010).
The Child’s Questions (Podmore, May & Carr, 2001).
Strands of Te
Whāriki
Learning and Development
Questions
The “Child’s
Q...
Key Messages
• Children’s rights are not about having rights at
the expense of others.
• They are about ensuring that chil...
Children’s Right to a Perfect World?
Early Intervention?
Rapid Response?
Child Abuse in New Zealand
Tom Scott Productions
24 September 2003
In NZ the Poor Are Our Children
Source: Professor Innes Asher
Young People Voiced Poverty As
“
”
Education Advocacy Service
• Provide positive outcomes for early childhood services,
schools and learners by maintaining c...
Implementation Handbook Checklist
Article 23: Disabled children should enjoy a full and decent life, in conditions
which e...
Draft Framework for Action: Key Points
• The importance of relationships with support/provider organisations
• The need fo...
Te Ara Tukutuku Nga
Whanaungatanga o Nga Tamariki
Every child is safe, nurtured, educated, healthy and
has hope for the fu...
THE LIFE CYCLE APPROACH
0 - 4 YEARS10 - 14 YEARS
15 - 17 YEARS
SOCIAL
COGNITIVE
EMOTIONAL
PHYSICAL
5 - 9 YEARS
SECONDARY
ENTRY POINT
Family/Whanau:
-Death
-Separation
-Illness/Disability
-Abandonment
-Employment
-Imprisonment
-Crisis...
RESPONSIVENESS
Adapted from Making it Happen, 2006, England
Primary
professional
within
Universal
Services
Lead
practition...
Inquiry into Formal Education and
Care For Under-2s: Why ?
EC sector is characterised by its concern
for quality and good ...
Why Did We Do This Inquiry?
• NZ is moving quickly towards non-
parental care for under-2s
• Fastest growth is in services...
Elements of Quality Service Provision
• High adult-child ratio
• Small group sizes
• Educators’ training, qualifications, ...
Start Strong: Responding to Every Child
“For a government that wants to improve the lot of its
people, investing in the fi...
Janis carroll lind childrens commission presentation 14 october
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Janis carroll lind childrens commission presentation 14 october

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The Office of the Children’s Commissioner provides independent advocacy for the interests, rights and well being of New Zealand’s children and young people up to the age of 18 on laws, policies, practices and other matters that affect them.

The Children’s Commissioner has a statutory right to investigate any matters affecting children and young people (unless the issue is before the Court).

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Janis carroll lind childrens commission presentation 14 october

  1. 1. Start Strong: A Children’s Rights Perspective on the IHC Action Plan Janis Carroll-Lind Principal Advisor (Education) StartStrong Seminar on Early and Sustained Support for Children with a Disability and their Families 14 October 2010
  2. 2. Office of the Children’s Commissioner In the core functions of advocacy, monitoring or investigation matters, the Children’s Commissioner has a statutory responsibility to be an independent advocate for children and young people and to take cognisance of the diversity of children in New Zealand. Pictured: Young People’s Reference Group
  3. 3. Role and Function of the Children’s Commissioner • Established 1989 under the Children, Young Persons and their Families Act • Part of worldwide movement • Independent voice for children and young people • Focus on CYP & F Act - investigating, monitoring policies and practices
  4. 4. The Children’s Commissioner Act 2003 • Previously in Children, Young Persons and their Families Act 1989 • Independent Crown Entity • Statutory advocate for children and young people • Monitor Child, Youth and Family Services • Work with Government to give effect to UNCROC Photograph used with permission
  5. 5. Consultation with Children The Children’s Commissioner must also ensure that children and young people are able to speak out on issues that concern them. Photo used with permission of Cardinal McKeefry School
  6. 6. The rights of every child and young person are recognised and each enjoys good health, education, safety and economic wellbeing OCC Vision Photographs Used With Permission Taonga Education Centre If we want every child to be the best they can be, what do we need to do to ensure that it can happen?
  7. 7. Key Outcome Goals for OCC • Every child is safe and nurtured • Every child has adequate resources and opportunities to develop • Society’s attitudes and behaviour change to become more child- focused
  8. 8. United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child Personal Photograph Used With Permission • An international treaty that spells out the basic human rights of children everywhere • Represents NZ’s commitment to promote and protect children’s interests, welfare and positive development • Was ratified in 1993 • Applied to every child and young person up to the age of 18 years.
  9. 9. What does UNCROC say? • Contains 54 articles spelling out children’s rights • Four groups of rights – Survival – Protection: right to be kept safe from harm – Provision: right to the necessities of life, e.g. education, health services – Participation: right to have a say in matters affecting them Personal Photograph Used With Permission
  10. 10. UNCROC: Article 3 In all actions concerning children, the best interests of the child should be a primary consideration. Personal Photograph Used With Permission
  11. 11. Relevant UNCROC Articles Article 2 No discrimination Article 3 Best interests of the child Article 6 Survival and development Article 12 Voice and respect Article 18 Joint responsibility for child care Article 23 Access and integration for children with disability Article 28 Access to education Article 29 Purpose of education Article 30 Indigenous rights to language and culture Article 31 The right to play and recreation.
  12. 12. Child Home Parents Family Education Setting Staff Peers Dual Socialisation Butterfly (Sommer, 2010).
  13. 13. The Child’s Questions (Podmore, May & Carr, 2001). Strands of Te Whāriki Learning and Development Questions The “Child’s Questions” Belonging Do you appreciate and understand my interests and abilities and those of my family? Do you know me? Well-being Do you meet my daily needs with care and sensitive consideration? Can I trust you? Exploration Do you engage my mind, offer challenges, and extend my world? Do you let me fly? Communication Do you invite me to communicate and respond to my own particular efforts? Do you hear me? Contribution Do you encourage and facilitate my endeavours to be part of the wider group? Is this place fair for us?
  14. 14. Key Messages • Children’s rights are not about having rights at the expense of others. • They are about ensuring that children are treated with the same degree of human dignity and respect that we as adults take for granted.
  15. 15. Children’s Right to a Perfect World? Early Intervention? Rapid Response?
  16. 16. Child Abuse in New Zealand Tom Scott Productions 24 September 2003
  17. 17. In NZ the Poor Are Our Children Source: Professor Innes Asher
  18. 18. Young People Voiced Poverty As “ ”
  19. 19. Education Advocacy Service • Provide positive outcomes for early childhood services, schools and learners by maintaining children within the education system • Reduce barriers to learning which are created by conflict between early childhood services, schools, children and parents • Improve relationships between the early childhood/school sector and the community.
  20. 20. Implementation Handbook Checklist Article 23: Disabled children should enjoy a full and decent life, in conditions which ensure dignity, promote self-reliance and facilitate the child’s active participation in the community. • Easy access to an independent mechanism for considering complaints? • National and local arrangements to ensure that parents are given advice, financial assistance and practical help to bring up a child with disabilities? • Access to achieving the fullest possible social integration and individual development without discrimination in inclusive settings? • Involvement of organisations of children with disabilities in planning, policy development and evaluation at all levels of government?
  21. 21. Draft Framework for Action: Key Points • The importance of relationships with support/provider organisations • The need for more respect, flexibility, and timely responsiveness for professionals and support organisations • Access to high quality, integrated, and practical early support services across New Zealand • Access to early, accessible and accurate information on entitlements, resources, supports, how to engage services and who to raise issues with.
  22. 22. Te Ara Tukutuku Nga Whanaungatanga o Nga Tamariki Every child is safe, nurtured, educated, healthy and has hope for the future An Integrated Framework Weaving Pathways to Wellbeing: Photograph used with permission Kawerau South School Young People’s Reference GroupPhotographs Used With Permission Taonga Education Centre
  23. 23. THE LIFE CYCLE APPROACH 0 - 4 YEARS10 - 14 YEARS 15 - 17 YEARS SOCIAL COGNITIVE EMOTIONAL PHYSICAL 5 - 9 YEARS
  24. 24. SECONDARY ENTRY POINT Family/Whanau: -Death -Separation -Illness/Disability -Abandonment -Employment -Imprisonment -Crisis Child: -Abuse/serious injury -Onset of illness -Disability -Specialist assessment -Behavioural problems -Violence -Exclusion from school -Transience/Moves -Teenage parents Sex Education Use of Services Access to Services Access to Resources Intentional Injury Unintentional Injury Mental health Growth/Development Dental Nutrition Height/Weight Vision Hearing Immunisation PHYSICAL EMOTIONAL Resiliency Self-Esteem Strengths Behaviours Coping Problem Solving Identity Agency Values Attachment Transition Further Education Employment Engagement Assessment Special Needs Learning School Readiness Speech Language COGNITIVE Relationships -Family -Peers -Community Cultural Wellbeing Recreation Interactions Connections Interests Activities Interdependence Independence Dependence SOCIAL CRITICAL DOMAINS 0 - 4 Years 15 - 17 Years 10 - 14 Years 5 - 9 Years UNIVERSAL ENTRY POINTS
  25. 25. RESPONSIVENESS Adapted from Making it Happen, 2006, England Primary professional within Universal Services Lead practitioner Statutory or professional role Lead professional within cross- sectoral team Primary professional liaises with specialist Some additional needs UNIVERSAL SERVICES Primary professional within Universal Services Lead practitioner Statutory or professional role Lead professional within cross- sectoral team Primary professional liaises with specialist NIVERSAL SERVICES
  26. 26. Inquiry into Formal Education and Care For Under-2s: Why ? EC sector is characterised by its concern for quality and good outcomes for young children. BUT • There are many different interests at play. • OCC is considering the issues from a perspective of children’s interests - through the lens of infants and toddlers.
  27. 27. Why Did We Do This Inquiry? • NZ is moving quickly towards non- parental care for under-2s • Fastest growth is in services for this age group • Debate in the literature on the benefits, risks, impact, and quality of formal ECS for under-2s.Personal Photograph Used With Permission
  28. 28. Elements of Quality Service Provision • High adult-child ratio • Small group sizes • Educators’ training, qualifications, and skills • Positive responsive care relationship between educator and child • Adequate, well-defined spaces • Significant parental involvement • Attention to health and safety requirements • Socially, culturally, and developmentally appropriate curriculum Personal Photograph Used With Permission
  29. 29. Start Strong: Responding to Every Child “For a government that wants to improve the lot of its people, investing in the first years of life is the best money it can spend…” (Carol Bellamy, CEO of UNICEF, 2004). Photograph used with permission

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