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State of Knowledge on Gender and Resilience: What Does the Evidence Show?

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State of Knowledge on Gender and Resilience: What Does the Evidence Show?

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Presented by Elizabeth Bryan, Senior Scientist, Environment and Production Technology Division (EPTD), International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), June 8, 2022. This presentation was for a lightning session on gender and resilience at a USAID Center for Resilience Cross-Agency Resilience Learning Event.

Presented by Elizabeth Bryan, Senior Scientist, Environment and Production Technology Division (EPTD), International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), June 8, 2022. This presentation was for a lightning session on gender and resilience at a USAID Center for Resilience Cross-Agency Resilience Learning Event.

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State of Knowledge on Gender and Resilience: What Does the Evidence Show?

  1. 1. State of Knowledge on Gender and Resilience: What Does the Evidence Show? Elizabeth Bryan (E.Bryan@cgiar.org), Senior Scientist, Environment and Production Technology Division (EPTD), International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) June 8, 2022 Credit: Carla Roncoli
  2. 2. Why pay attention to gender in resilience programming? Climate Crisis COVID-19 Food Price Crisis
  3. 3. Why Pay Attention to Gender in Resilience Programming? Multiple, overlapping global crises including climate change, COVID-19, and the global food crisis have differential effects on men and women. So the global community should: • Ensure programs to address these crises are implemented in a socially inclusive and gender equitable way • Reach the most vulnerable populations (often women) to mitigate potential harm • Enhance the effectiveness of interventions by ensuring that both men and women have the capacity to respond to shocks and stressors and contribute to increasing resilience, including achieving food security and improving health outcomes and nutrition
  4. 4. Gender, Climate Change, and Nutrition (GCAN) Framework: Gender and Resilience Dimensions ▪ Key elements of resilience requiring a gender lens: o Exposure and sensitivity to shocks and stresses o Resilience capacities o Decision-making context and responses choices oPathways and well-being outcomes
  5. 5. Conclusions and Policy Implications ▪ Appropriate interventions/approaches depend on the context ▪ Policies and interventions must incorporate a gender lens to close gaps ▪ Some promising interventions include: oHousehold and community dialogues to promote joint decision-making (budgeting, NRM etc) oClosing resource gaps (access to land/water) oGroup-based approaches (e.g. women’s self-help groups) oBuild women’s assets (e.g. through social protection programs targeted to women)

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