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Measuring dietary outcomes with the MDD-W indicator

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Estefania Custodio
IFPRI-FAO conference, "Accelerating the End of Hunger and Malnutrition"
November 28–30, 2018
Bangkok, Thailand

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Measuring dietary outcomes with the MDD-W indicator

  1. 1. Measuring dietary outcomes with the MDD-W indicator Minimum Dietary Diversity for Women: The Status and the Opportunities Estefania Custodio, PhD, Scientific Officer, European Commission | November 30th of 2018, Bangkok FAO-EU workshop, Bangkok 27-28th November 2018
  2. 2. Beyond Hunger and Malnutrition
  3. 3. Measuring diet and the SDGs  Poor dietary habits have been consistently identified as one of the leading risk factors for ill health and mortality globally over the last 30 years.  In 2017 poor diets were associated with nearly 1 in 5 of all deaths*.  Yet, diet quality is not reflected in any of the SDG indicators *The Lancet, volume 392, issue 10159, November 10, 2018
  4. 4. Measuring diet- Dietary diversity indicators "Gold standard" methods for dietary data collection require exceptionally resource intensive data collection, processing and analysis and results have commonly been under-used. Result of a rising demand for simple indicators to reflect at least some aspects of diet quality Dietary diversity indicators have undergone thorough studies to have a nutrition meaning
  5. 5. Measuring diet- Dietary Diversity Indicators
  6. 6. The minimum dietary diversity for women of reproductive age– MDD-W The proportion of women 15-49 years of age who consumed food items from at least five out of ten defined food groups the previous day or night 1. Grains, white roots and tubers, and plantains 2. Pulses (beans, peas and lentils) 3. Nuts and seeds 4. Dairy 5. Meat, poultry and fish 6. Meat, poultry and fish 7. Eggs 8. Dark green leafy vegetables 9. Other vitamin A rich fruits and vegetables 10. Other fruits
  7. 7. MDD-W and SDG-2 Food SecurityNutrition
  8. 8. MDD-W and SDG-2 Target 2.1: By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round. Target 2.2:By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons
  9. 9. MDD-W and SDG-2 Target 2.2:By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons.
  10. 10. MDD-W is not perfect Reflects only one dimension of diet quality Does not reflect the quantities of nutritious foods consumed or other dimensions like moderation or balance/quality of macronutrients Is not appropriate for individual screening Should not be used as basis for dietary guidelines or communication messages Not single indicator is sufficient for everything
  11. 11. MDD-W: The opportunities  Can be used for assessments of diet quality at national and subnational levels in resource poor settings  Suitable for integration into large-scale surveys  Can be compared with previous assessments, so long as survey timing accounts for seasonality and same baseline and end line surveys are used  It can fill the gap of a food-based indicator for use in target setting, advocacy and impact evaluation of nutrition sensitive actions  Can inform on effective policy and improving diets and nutrition of women of reproductive age.
  12. 12. Where is MDD-W data collected? National (10) Impact Evaluation (21*) Data collection planned (30) *Ethiopia & Zambia are under national surveys
  13. 13. Minimum Dietary Diversity for Women: The Status and the Opportunities FAO-EU workshop, Bangkok 27-28th November 2018 Maria Antonia Tuazon and Alexandra Tung, Nutrition and Food Systems Division, FAO Francois Kayitakire, Joint Research Centre, EU and all participants of the workshop Thank you

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