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Insights form the EAT-Lancet Report: Healthy diets from sustainable food systems

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Michael Clark
IFPRI-FAO conference, "Accelerating the End of Hunger and Malnutrition"
November 28–30, 2018
Bangkok, Thailand

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Insights form the EAT-Lancet Report: Healthy diets from sustainable food systems

  1. 1. Insights from the EAT-Lancet Commission Report: 
 Healthy Diets from 
 Sustainable Food Systems Michael Clark University of Oxford Livestock, Environment, and People Project michael.clark@dph.ox.ac.uk 29 November, 2018
  2. 2. Less than half the adult population
 has a healthy body weight Slide 1NCD-RISC (2018) BMI Group Men Women BMI < 18.5 (underweight) 8.1 9 BMI 18.5 to 20 (normal weight) 8.9 9.3 BMI 20 to 25 (normal weight) 40.7 39 BMI 25 to 30 (overweight) 28.4 24.8 BMI > 30 (obese) 11.5 15.7 Percent of Adult Population
  3. 3. The food system is a major
 source of GHG emissions Electricity Agriculture Industry Transportation 3 IPCC (2014) Slide 2
  4. 4. Tilman et al (2018) Slide 3 The food system is the largest
 threat to biodiversity
  5. 5. What are healthy diets from
 sustainable food systems? Slide 4
  6. 6. What is a healthy diet? Recommended intake (possible range), g/day Recommended intake (possible range), g/day Staples Dairy foods Whole grains 232 (0-60% of energy) Whole milk equivalents 250 (0-500) Starchy vegetables 50 (0-100) Fruit and vegetables Added fats Vegetables 300 (200-600) Palm oil 6.8 (0-6.8) Fruit 200 (100-300) Unsaturated oils 40 (20-80) Legumes Protein sources Pulses 50 (0-100) Beef and lamb 7 (0-14) Soy foods 25 (0-50) Pork 7 (0-14) Peanuts 25 (0-75) Poultry 29 (0-58) Tree nuts 25 Eggs 13 (0-25) Fish 28 (0-100) Added sugars All sweeteners 31 (0-31) Willett et al (2019) Slide 5
  7. 7. Are we eating healthy diets? Slide 6 0 100 200 300 R ed M eat(14g) Starchy vegetables (50g) Eggs (13g)Fish (28g) Poultry (29g) Vegetables (300g) Fruit(200g) D airy (250g) Legum es (50g) W hole grains (230g) N uts (25g) DietaryIntakein2010vs ReferenceHealthyDiet Recommended Intake Willett et al (2019)
  8. 8. Are we eating healthy diets? Slide 7 0 100 200 300 R ed M eat(14g) Starchy vegetables (50g) Eggs (13g)Fish (28g) Poultry (29g) Vegetables (300g) Fruit(200g) D airy (250g) Legum es (50g) W hole grains (230g) N uts (25g) DietaryIntakein2010vs ReferenceHealthyDiet 0 100 200 300 R ed M eat(14g) Starchy vegetables (50g) Eggs (13g)Fish (28g) Poultry (29g) Vegetables (300g) Fruit(200g) D airy (250g) Legum es (50g) W hole grains (230g) N uts (2 DietaryIntakein2010vs ReferenceHealthyDiet Recommended Intake Willett et al (2019)
  9. 9. Slide 8 0 100 200 300 R ed M eat(14g) Starchy vegetables (50g) Eggs (13g)Fish (28g) Poultry (29g) Vegetables (300g) Fruit(200g) D airy (250g) Legum es (50g) W hole grains (230g) N uts (25g) DietaryIntakein2010vs ReferenceHealthyDiet Are we eating healthy diets? 0 100 200 300 R ed M eat(14g) Starchy vegetables (50g) Eggs (13g)Fish (28g) Poultry (29g) Vegetables (300g) Fruit(200g) D airy (250g) Legum es (50g) W hole grains (230g) N uts (2 DietaryIntakein2010vs ReferenceHealthyDiet Recommended Intake Willett et al (2019)
  10. 10. Slide 9 0 100 200 300 R ed M eat(14g) Starchy vegetables (50g) Eggs (13g)Fish (28g) Poultry (29g) Vegetables (300g) Fruit(200g) D airy (250g) Legum es (50g) W hole grains (230g) N uts (25g) DietaryIntakein2010vs ReferenceHealthyDiet Are we eating healthy diets? Recommended Intake Willett et al (2019)
  11. 11. What are sustainable 
 food systems? Steffen et al (2015) Slide 10
  12. 12. Slide 11 0 50 100 150 200 250 G H G s C ropland areaN itrogen application Phosphorus application Freshw ateruse PercentofPlanetaryBoundary Year 2010 2050 The food system already surpasses environmental limits Env. Limit Willett et al (2019)
  13. 13. Slide 12 0 50 100 150 200 250 G H G s C ropland areaN itrogen application Phosphorus application Freshw ateruse PercentofPlanetaryBoundary Year 2010 2050 Food system impacts will increase 50-80% from 2010 to 2050 Env. Limit Willett et al (2019)
  14. 14. How can we achieve a 
 sustainable food system? Slide 13Willett et al (2019)
  15. 15. How can we achieve a 
 sustainable food system? Slide 14Willett et al (2019)
  16. 16. How can we achieve a 
 sustainable food system? Slide 15Willett et al (2019)
  17. 17. How can we achieve a 
 sustainable food system? Slide 16Willett et al (2019)
  18. 18. How can we achieve a 
 sustainable food system? Slide 17Willett et al (2019)
  19. 19. A combination of changes to the
 food system is needed Slide 18 1) Dietary transitions to diets with fewer animal
 source foods
  20. 20. A combination of changes to the
 food system is needed Slide 19 1) Dietary transitions to diets with fewer animal
 source foods 2) Changes in food production systems to 
 increase efficiency
  21. 21. A combination of changes to the
 food system is needed Slide 20 1) Dietary transitions to diets with fewer animal
 source foods 2) Changes in food production systems to 
 increase efficiency 3) Reductions in food loss and waste across
 the entire food supply chain
  22. 22. These changes will also help 
 achieve other global targets Slide 21
  23. 23. Acknowledgements
  24. 24. Acknowledgements Walter Willett Johan Rockström Brent Loken Marco Springmann Tim Lang Sonja Vermeulen Tara Garnett David Tilman Fabrice DeClerck Amanda Wood Malin Jonell Line Gordon Jessica Fanzo Corinna Hawkes Rami Zurayk Juan A Rivera Wim De Vries Lindiwe Sibanda Ashkan Afshin Abhishek Chaudhary Mario Herrero Rina Agustina Francesco Branca Shenggen Fang Beatrice Crona Elizabeth Fox Victoria Bignet Max Troell Therese Lindahl Sudhvir Singh Sarah Cornell Srinath Reddy Sunity Narain Sania Nishtar Anna Lartey Chris Murray

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