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From Promise to
Impact
The Global Nutrition Report
• Independent
• Global
• All Forms of Nutrition
• Data Driven
• Encourages Accountability
What’s New in 2016?
• New Era: Global shift to SDGs
• New Opportunities: UN Decade of
Action
• New Data: On Implementation...
Outline
• Key Findings
• Calls to Action
• Takeaways
• What you can do
Key
Findings
1. Malnutrition creates ripples of
individual and societal challenges &
opportunities
Akin Adesina
President of the
African Development
Bank
“We need to
invest in gray
matter
infrastructure.”
“Neuronal
infras...
2. The world is off track
to reach global
targets—but there is
hope.
Meeting Targets: Where are we now?
Source: Authors, based on data from Stevens et al. (2013), UNICEF (2016b), UNICEF, WHO,...
3. Nutrition is central
to the SDGs
Nutrition feeds into 12 of the 17 SDGs — and
dozens of the indicators used to track the SDGs
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
3
7
7
12
12
Goa...
4. There is a gap between
current commitments and need
There are few SMART targets in country
plans
48 46
33
30
27
10
Stunting Exclusive
breastfeeding
Anemia in
women
Wasting Lo...
Few Countries have Targets for Diet Related
NCDs
32 32
25
Obesity Diabetes Salt Reduction
Source: Unpublished self-reporte...
5. SMART Commitments
and Targets Matter
• Countries: Nutrition targets & rate of stunting reduction
• Companies: Targets & performance
• Donors: Public commitment...
• SMART? Only 29%
• Aligned to all forms of
malnutrition? No. NCDs and
obesity missing.
• Response rate in 2016?
o 55% ove...
6. We must move
beyond talk to action
Coverage of nutrition-specific
interventions remains highly variable
across countries
0
20
40
60
80
100
Exclusive
breastfe...
Implementation of the International Code on
the Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes is
weak
47 45
61
95
100
82
62
Africa ...
Data source: WHO, 2015,
Progress on Implementing Diet
Policies is Slow
7. Today’s nutrition data are not
sufficient to maximize investment
Stunting prevalence by
region
Map of stunting rates in
Cambodia
• Number of people displaced by war has
risen
o 45 million in 2012, 60 million in 2014
• Too little data on nutrition of r...
Calls to
Action
1. Make the
political choice to
end all forms of
malnutrition
Reject current trends
continuation of current trends
WHA
goal
15% by 2025
15% by 2084
Anemia in Women
The ingredients for
success are well
known… ...and can
lead
to rapid
improvement
s
in nutrition.
Political leadership
& SM...
2. Invest more and
allocate better
To meet WHA targets by 2025 funding will
have to multiply:
Governments x 2
Donors x 3.5
Total x 3
World Bank/R4D
Shekar et...
Mismatch of donor funding and
disease burden for diet-related NCDs
10%0.04%
0.04% of donor aid
spending to diet
related NC...
4. Invest in
proven solutions
& find new ones
Look outside nutrition to affect
nutrition status
Source: Authors, based on data and analysis by Monica Kothari, Demograph...
agriculture and food
systems
social protection
women’s
empowerment
WASH
education
There are many ways to
support nutrition...
5. Tackle malnutrition—in all its
forms
Under 5 Stunting
Women’s Anemia
Adult Overweight
Ethiopia, Rwanda
Ghana, Japan, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Thailand
Argentina,
Au...
Malnutrition is not destiny. Ending it is a
political choice—supported by SMART
commitments for accountability.
Many count...
Three things you can do
• Challenge decision makers with evidence
on the slow pace of malnutrition reduction
• Make those ...
Thank you
Thank
you
INTERNATIONAL
FOODPOLICY
RESEARCH
INSTITUTE
IFPRI
RESEA RCH
PROGRA M ON
Agriculture for
Nutrition
and ...
Global Nutrition Report 2016: From Promise to Impact
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Global Nutrition Report 2016: From Promise to Impact

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Global Nutrition Report 2016 general presentation

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Global Nutrition Report 2016: From Promise to Impact

  1. 1. From Promise to Impact
  2. 2. The Global Nutrition Report • Independent • Global • All Forms of Nutrition • Data Driven • Encourages Accountability
  3. 3. What’s New in 2016? • New Era: Global shift to SDGs • New Opportunities: UN Decade of Action • New Data: On Implementation, Budgets • New Analyses: Funding Gaps • New Success Stories: Ghana, Kenya, Chile • New Calls to Action
  4. 4. Outline • Key Findings • Calls to Action • Takeaways • What you can do
  5. 5. Key Findings
  6. 6. 1. Malnutrition creates ripples of individual and societal challenges & opportunities
  7. 7. Akin Adesina President of the African Development Bank “We need to invest in gray matter infrastructure.” “Neuronal infrastructure is quite possibly going to be the most important infrastructure.” Jim Kim President, World Bank We couldn’t have said it better ourselves..
  8. 8. 2. The world is off track to reach global targets—but there is hope.
  9. 9. Meeting Targets: Where are we now? Source: Authors, based on data from Stevens et al. (2013), UNICEF (2016b), UNICEF, WHO, and World Bank (2015), and WHO (2015a).
  10. 10. 3. Nutrition is central to the SDGs
  11. 11. Nutrition feeds into 12 of the 17 SDGs — and dozens of the indicators used to track the SDGs 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 3 7 7 12 12 Goal 12: Sustainable cons &… Goal 17: Global Partnerships Goal 8: Growth & Employment Goal 16: Peace and Justice Goal 4: Education Goal 6: WASH Goal 10: Reduce Inequality Goal 11: Cities Goal 1: Poverty Goal 2: Hunger and Nutrition Goal 3: Healthy Lives Goal 5: Gender Equality Number of indicators highly relevant to nutrition Number of indicators not highly relelvant to nutrition Source: Authors
  12. 12. 4. There is a gap between current commitments and need
  13. 13. There are few SMART targets in country plans 48 46 33 30 27 10 Stunting Exclusive breastfeeding Anemia in women Wasting Low birth weight Under 5 overweight Percent of 122 Nutrition Plans with SMART Targets for.. Source: Authors, based on data from Chizuru Nishida and Kaia Engesveen.
  14. 14. Few Countries have Targets for Diet Related NCDs 32 32 25 Obesity Diabetes Salt Reduction Source: Unpublished self-reported data from the NCD Country Capacity Survey, provided by the WHO Surveillance and Population-based Prevention Unit, Department for Prevention of NCDs. Printed with permission. % Percent of 174 countries with targets for…
  15. 15. 5. SMART Commitments and Targets Matter
  16. 16. • Countries: Nutrition targets & rate of stunting reduction • Companies: Targets & performance • Donors: Public commitment & spending on nutrition Commitment and Impact go hand in hand
  17. 17. • SMART? Only 29% • Aligned to all forms of malnutrition? No. NCDs and obesity missing. • Response rate in 2016? o 55% overall o 30% for businesses • Financial commitments? o 60% met – good Nutrition 4 Growth Commitments
  18. 18. 6. We must move beyond talk to action
  19. 19. Coverage of nutrition-specific interventions remains highly variable across countries 0 20 40 60 80 100 Exclusive breastfeeding<6 months Minimum dietary diversity (6-23 mo) Zinc treatment for diarrhoea (U5) Vitamin A suppl. (U5) Iron suppl. (U5) Salt iodization (household) Iron-Folic acid suppl. 90+ days (pregnant women) Coverage%
  20. 20. Implementation of the International Code on the Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes is weak 47 45 61 95 100 82 62 Africa Asia Latin America and the Caribbean Europe North America Oceania GLOBAL Percent of countries with data (n=183) with no or few provisions of the Code in law Source: WHO, UNICEF, IBFAN 2016. Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes: National Implementation of the International Code, Status Report 2016. Geneva: WHO
  21. 21. Data source: WHO, 2015, Progress on Implementing Diet Policies is Slow
  22. 22. 7. Today’s nutrition data are not sufficient to maximize investment
  23. 23. Stunting prevalence by region
  24. 24. Map of stunting rates in Cambodia
  25. 25. • Number of people displaced by war has risen o 45 million in 2012, 60 million in 2014 • Too little data on nutrition of refugee populations o When they are measured (UNHCR), they are vulnerable • In the era of “Leave No One Behind” we need o Better monitoring of nutrition status Leave no one behind—refugees included.
  26. 26. Calls to Action
  27. 27. 1. Make the political choice to end all forms of malnutrition
  28. 28. Reject current trends continuation of current trends WHA goal 15% by 2025 15% by 2084 Anemia in Women
  29. 29. The ingredients for success are well known… ...and can lead to rapid improvement s in nutrition. Political leadership & SMART commitment Brazil Ethiopia Kenya Maharashtra Nutrition- oriented development Bangladesh Colombia Ghana Tanzania Data Systems Guatemala Indonesia Peru Strong implementation Argentina Burkina Faso Chile
  30. 30. 2. Invest more and allocate better
  31. 31. To meet WHA targets by 2025 funding will have to multiply: Governments x 2 Donors x 3.5 Total x 3 World Bank/R4D Shekar et al. 2016 Funding gaps: Substantial but bridgeable
  32. 32. Mismatch of donor funding and disease burden for diet-related NCDs 10%0.04% 0.04% of donor aid spending to diet related NCDs ($50m) Source: GNR 2016 10% % of disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa from diet related NCDs Source: GBD Update 2015
  33. 33. 4. Invest in proven solutions & find new ones
  34. 34. Look outside nutrition to affect nutrition status Source: Authors, based on data and analysis by Monica Kothari, Demographic and Health (DHS) surveys, 2005–2014. Source: Authors, based on data and analysis by Monica Kothari, Demographic and Health (DHS) surveys, 2005–2014.
  35. 35. agriculture and food systems social protection women’s empowerment WASH education There are many ways to support nutrition GNR analysis shows all 5 areas need strengthening
  36. 36. 5. Tackle malnutrition—in all its forms
  37. 37. Under 5 Stunting Women’s Anemia Adult Overweight Ethiopia, Rwanda Ghana, Japan, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Thailand Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Germany, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, FYR Macedonia, Tonga, USA, Uruguay Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Timor- Leste, Togo, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe Honduras, Nicaragua Algeria, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Dominican republic, El Salvador, Gabon, Georgia, Guyana, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Oman, Panama, Republic of Moldova, Saint Lucia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Seychelles, Suriname, Tunisia, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Venezuela Albania, Armenia, Botswana, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Guatemala, Haiti, Iraq, Lesotho, Libya, Namibia, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Vanuatu, Yemen 57 countries—Serious Problems
  38. 38. Malnutrition is not destiny. Ending it is a political choice—supported by SMART commitments for accountability. Many countries are on course to meet targe Many more are on the verge of doing so. Coexistence of multiple forms of malnutrition is the new normal. Nutrition stakeholders need to unite and then grow the nutrition constituency. Three takeaways
  39. 39. Three things you can do • Challenge decision makers with evidence on the slow pace of malnutrition reduction • Make those essential but challenging alliances for nutrition with those outside your immediate circle • Make SMART commitments for nutrition and ask others to do the same
  40. 40. Thank you Thank you INTERNATIONAL FOODPOLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IFPRI RESEA RCH PROGRA M ON Agriculture for Nutrition and Health LED BYIFPRI Universityof Indonesia Senegal (CLM)PakistanNigeriaMalawiGuatemala(SESAN)Ethiopia Universityof Abomey-Calavi Indonesia

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