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Future Smart Foods for Cambodia: Harnessing the Potentials of Future Smart Foods for Zero Hunger in Cambodia

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Sok Silo
IFPRI-FAO conference side event, "Accelerating the End of Hunger and Malnutrition"
November 28–30, 2018
Bangkok, Thailand

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Future Smart Foods for Cambodia: Harnessing the Potentials of Future Smart Foods for Zero Hunger in Cambodia

  1. 1. Future Smart Foods for Cambodia Harnessing the potentials of Future Smart Foods for Zero Hunger in Cambodia Dr. Sok Silo, Deputy Secretary General, Council for Rural and Agricultural Development, Office of the Council of Ministers, Kingdom of Cambodia 30 November, 2018, Bangkok
  2. 2. Presentation Outline I. Commitment of the Royal Government of Cambodia II. Future Smart Foods for diversity and sustainability III. Suggested Future Smart Foods for Cambodia IV. Conclusions for Cambodia V. Balancing interests and investments in new product development VI. New solutions for New Challenges
  3. 3. ▪ To address the issue of malnutrition, the Royal Government of Cambodia (RGC) has prioritized food security and nutrition and considers investment in nutrition as an “accelerator” to scale up the achievement of other SDGs relating to people’s well-being, human capital and national economic development, and the RGC has committed to Leave No One Behind. I- Commitment of the Royal Government of Cambodia
  4. 4. ▪ Samdech Prime Minister Hun Sen gave specific recommendations for dealing with malnutrition including that we must ‘Continue to invest in strengthening food diversification… by focusing on the diversification of climate-resilient and nutrition-rich crops and seeds and increasing production of vegetables, fruit, poultry and fish, food systems and changes of attitude in order to promote food security and nutrition, and food safety, and to improve food quality for the people.’ I- Commitment of the Royal Government of Cambodia
  5. 5. II- Future Smart Foods for diversity and sustainability ▪ Through its policy of agricultural diversification, the RGC and development partners have aligned their efforts to promote a wider range of crops for sustainable production and consumption. ▪ This is helping to shift the emphasis away from rice to a wider range of crops including vegetables, pulses, fruits and other crops. ▪ The search for future smart foods for Cambodia helps to extend the prospects for diversification and tailors the selection process around local adaptation, resilience to climate change, market potential and nutritional value.
  6. 6. III- Suggested Future Smart Foods for Cambodia 1. Wild Vigna (Vigna umbellate) 2. Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) 3. Taro (Colocasia esculenta) 4. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) 5. Ivy Gourd (Coccinia grandis) 6. Drum stick (Moringa oleifera) 7. Yam (Dioscorea Esculenta)
  7. 7. III.1. Wild Vigna (Vigna umbellate) ▪ Origin and distribution: Annual form, mostly grow in upland areas and drought tolerant. ▪ Part of plant used: Seed used for soup, glutinous rice cake and dessert. ▪ Nutrition and health benefit: high protein content, high sulphur amino acids and consequently a high chemical score. Moreover, the level of resistant starch was also high (64–75%). Trypsin inhibitors present thought to prevent cancer.
  8. 8. III.2. Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) ▪ Distribution and availability: Perennial vine and drought tolerant, mostly planted in sandy soils in lowland areas. ▪ Part of plant used: Roots are boiled, fried or made into dried chips while leaves are used for cooking and animal feeding. ▪ Nutrition and health benefit: High vitamin A, energy and carbohydrate, vitamin B6, vitamin C and Vitamin D and magnesium, which is the relaxation and anti-stress mineral.
  9. 9. III.3. Taro (Colocasia esculenta) ▪ Distribution and availability: Grown in both upland and lowland areas, mostly around the village beside the paddy field. ▪ Parts of plant used: corm and leaf. ▪ Nutrition and health benefit: Corm rich in carbohydrate and leaf rich in calcium. Health benefits of taro root include its ability to improve digestion, protect the skin, increase circulation, and lower blood sugar levels. Cooking negates toxic effects.
  10. 10. III.4. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) ▪ Distribution and availability: mostly grown in upland area. In lowland areas sometimes grown after wet season rice. ▪ Part of plant used: seed ▪ Nutrition and health benefit: Rich in energy, fat, carbohydrate, protein and manganese which have been shown to promote heart health.
  11. 11. III.5. Slek Bash or Ivy Gourd (Coccinia grandis) ▪ Distribution and availability: found among the wild plants near the village along the fences. ▪ Part of plant used: Leaf used for soup. Boiled leaves can be used for salad and eaten with fermented fish. ▪ Nutrition and health benefit: rich in vitamins and minerals including iron, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B1, dietary fiber and calcium. Reported to lower blood sugar level, prevent obesity, prevent kidney stones, lower heart disease and risk of stroke.
  12. 12. III.6. Drum stick (Moringa oleifera) ▪ Distribution and availability: Drum stick trees are planted along fences and in home gardens. Some commercial production ▪ Parts of plant used: leaves and seed ▪ Nutrition and health benefit: Rich in Ca, K, Vitamin C, and protein, highly nutritious and powerful anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and tissue-protective properties. Becoming more popular and has potential for value adding from making moringa powder.
  13. 13. III.7. Yam (Dioscorea Esculenta) ▪ Distribution and availability: Perennial vine and Yam typically plant in Humid tropic in both lowland and Upland areas. ▪ Part of plant used: Tubers are boiled, made a sweetened dessert, soups, fried or made into dried chips while leaves are used for cooking and animal feeding. ▪ Nutrition and health benefit: Vitamin A, energy and carbohydrate, vitamin B6, vitamin C and Vitamin D and High Potasium, Calcium, Phosphorus, magnesium .
  14. 14. IV- Conclusions for Cambodia ▪ A diversity of underutilized crops was found in Cambodia. ▪ Farmers tend to keep traditional practices in agriculture and maintain significant crop genetic diversity in their fields but there is rapid change underway. ▪ Rice is the main crop followed by cassava, maize and cashew nut, however, production still remain in difficulties in some areas due to drought, submergence and heat. ▪ Therefore, underutilized crops can play an important role in food security, nutrition and income generation. ▪ Some traditional varieties are rapidly replaced by the introduced variety due to preferences for high yield, commercial interests and lack of seed source (e.g. local maize) and thereafter are in danger of extinction.
  15. 15. Public Sector Interests ▪ Regulation of the private sector in the public interest ▪ Incentives for actions that promote sustainable production and consumption ▪ Investment of public funds in public goods including research for agricultural production and public health ▪ Information and education campaigns to guide the public and inform decision makers Private Sector Interests ▪ Market responsiveness is critical ▪ Value chains are primarily private sector networks ▪ Profitability the driving concern for the private sector ▪ Limited interest or capacity for investing in research activity ▪ Less interest in promotion of diversity V- Balancing interests and investments in new product development
  16. 16. VI- New solutions for New Challenges ▪ Government must proceed with caution in promoting the cultivation of specific crops in Cambodia. ▪ However, the selection criteria defining future smart foods ensure that both the interests of farmers and consumers are protected. ▪ We must examine the full range of species and varieties available for development, looking into the prospects for endemic or underutilised species to offer new solutions for the new challenges that we face in the future.
  17. 17. Thank You for your Attention !

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