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Accelerators for ending hunger & malnutrition

Accelerators for ending hunger & malnutrition

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Prabhu Pingali
IFPRI-FAO conference, "Accelerating the End of Hunger and Malnutrition"
November 28–30, 2018
Bangkok, Thailand

Prabhu Pingali
IFPRI-FAO conference, "Accelerating the End of Hunger and Malnutrition"
November 28–30, 2018
Bangkok, Thailand

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Accelerators for ending hunger & malnutrition

  1. 1. Accelerators for ending hunger & malnutrition PRABHU PINGALI PROFESSOR OF APPLIED ECONOMICS AND DIRECTOR TATA-CORNELL INSTITUTE FOR AGRICULTURE AND NUTRITION CORNELL UNIVERSITY IFPRI-FAO CONFERENCE ON ACCELERATING THE END OF HUNGER & MALNUTRITION, BANGKOK THAILAND, 28-30TH NOVEMBER, 2018
  2. 2. An accelerator is: a specific technological intervention, policy change, or institutional reform, often a combination thereof, that leads to transformative change at scale in the sustainable reduction of hunger and malnutrition. Transformative change in food systems requires a transition from a focus on quantity to an emphasis on quality, diversity & safety. Inter-sectoral synergies are essential for sustainable reductions in malnutrition in all its forms.
  3. 3. Hunger Reduction – lessons from the Green Revolution ➢There are no silver bullets: Technology is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for productivity growth ➢Infrastructure investments are essential – In India the GR succeeded only in areas with irrigation and road investments ➢Market incentives are crucial – rapid productivity growth in China resulted from the de-collectivization process of the late 1970s ➢Institutional reforms are vital – improved land tenancy rights and market reforms lead to Vietnam’s agricultural transformation
  4. 4. Limits to GR strategy for hunger reduction ➢ Regions left behind – narrow focus on promoting the top three staple grains ➢ Progress on hunger reduction but malnutrition persists – limited access to food system diversity and quality ➢ Intra-household equity gap – rural women not empowered to adequately share in the benefits of productivity growth ➢ Rising environmental trade-offs – poor incentives for adopting sustainable intensification practices
  5. 5. SDG 2: End hunger, Achieve Food Security, Improved Nutrition & Promote Sustainable Agriculture Specific Targets for 2030 2.1: End hunger & ensure access to safe, nutritious & sufficient food 2.2: End all forms of malnutrition, including child stunting & wasting by 2025 2.3: Double agricultural productivity & incomes of small scale producers 2.4: Ensure sustainable production systems & adaptation to climate change & extreme weather events 2.5: Maintain genetic diversity of cultivated plants & domesticated animals
  6. 6. A “Perfect Storm” of Global Threats & Challenges ➢ Rising urbanization and changing demographic structure of rural populations ➢ Changing diets & rapid rise in over-nutrition and epidemic of NCDs even as malnutrition rates remain high ➢ Global environmental and sustainability challenges, including climate shocks and extreme events ➢ Trade integration and declining competitiveness of developing country agriculture
  7. 7. Re-imagining accelerators for food systems change ➢ Diversify from commodity focused policy to a nutrition-sensitive food system ➢ Seek disruptive technological breakthroughs for enhancing resource efficiency, shelf life, food quality, safety and waste. ➢ Adapt new science tools, e.g. ‘big data’, ICT, and precision ag. to smallholder systems ➢ Promote opportunities for “Leapfrogging” traditional infrastructure constraints ➢ Improve targeting & management of safety net programs using ICT tools
  8. 8. Inter-sectoral synergy for addressing malnutrition Tata-Cornell Institute Conceptual Framework HOUSEHOLD FOOD SUPPLY & INCOME HOUSEHOLD ACCESS TO MICRONUTRIENTS NUTRIENT ABSORPTION & UTILIZATION INTRA-HOUSEHOLD Equity PATHWAY WASH PATHWAY FOOD DIVERSITY PATHWAY INCOME PATHWAY HOUSEHOLD FOOD ACCESS (Quantity, quality and diversity of food) INDIVIDUAL NUTRITION (Individual intake and absorption of nutrient-dense foods) IMPROVED NUTRITION OUTCOMES ALLOCATION OF FOOD TO WOMEN & CHILDREN
  9. 9. THANK YOU! Learn more about the Tata-Cornell Institute for Agriculture & Nutrition http://tci.cornell.edu

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