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The Future of a
Sustainable Global Food
System
Juergen Voegele
Sr. Director, Agriculture Global
Practice
The World Bank
Ph...
2
• Able to feed every person, every day, in every country with a
safe, nutritious and affordable diet (+35% more food - F...
Projected Trends Will Not Get Us There
3
Increase in Food Production (%) by 2030 Income Increase to 2030 (% per year)
Heal...
4
Global Food System: the need to focus on delivering improved nutrition and health
• The triple burden of malnutrition:
•...
5
The challenges of ending poverty, undernourishment, stunting, and
obesity vary across low- middle- and high-income count...
Producers
Reduce hunger
Reduce hidden hunger
Reduce excessive calorie intake
Improve food safety
Increase food availabilit...
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2016 Global Food Policy Report: The future of a sustainable global food system

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Presentation by Juergen voegele, Senior Director for the Agricultural Global Practice at the World Bank, for the launch of the 2016 Global Food Policy Report on March 31, 2016 in Washington, DC

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2016 Global Food Policy Report: The future of a sustainable global food system

  1. 1. The Future of a Sustainable Global Food System Juergen Voegele Sr. Director, Agriculture Global Practice The World Bank Photo credit: National Geographic, March 2016.
  2. 2. 2 • Able to feed every person, every day, in every country with a safe, nutritious and affordable diet (+35% more food - FAO) • Jobs and income gains in the food system to meet poverty reduction targets (+4.5% per capita income growth - DEC) Improved health outcomes End of hunger & reduced child stunting (to 5%) Reduced food related NCDs No net increase in obesity Improved sustainability Reduced GHG emissions Improved land & water mgt Protected local communities & biodiversity 2030 Vision for the Global Food System SDG Goal 2: End Hunger, achieve food security, and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture
  3. 3. Projected Trends Will Not Get Us There 3 Increase in Food Production (%) by 2030 Income Increase to 2030 (% per year) Health Outcomes (bn people) by 2030 GHG Emissions from Agriculture (% change) by 2030 +20%* +35% Trend Vision +13%* -25% Trend Vision 2.5%* 4.5%* Trend Vision • 2.5.% is 10 yr trend growth (2003-2012) of agricultural labor productivity in low income countries projected forward to 2030; 4.5% is estimated agricultural incomes gains of the poor needed to end poverty by 2030. • Trend assumes a 2oC warmer world by 2030 and an associated 10% reduction in food crop yields • Trend includes diets/consumption shifts with increased incomes • Trend assumes 8% undernourishment rate and 6.8 bn people in developing countries by 2030, Vision is 3%. • Trend: WRI estimates 0.5 0.2 1.4 0.7 Trend Vision Undernourished Obese
  4. 4. 4 Global Food System: the need to focus on delivering improved nutrition and health • The triple burden of malnutrition: • 795 million people afflicted by hunger • Over 2 billion deficient in key vitamins and minerals • Over 2 billion overweight or obese (2/3 in developing countries) • The overall burden of food borne diseases is comparable to that of major infectious diseases; the burden is highest for young children and in low- income countries (WHO, 2015) • The Global Food System needs to shift from being part of the problem to being part of the solution “Better Food: Shaping the Global Food System to Deliver Improved Nutrition and Health” prepared for the 2016 Spring Meetings of the World Bank and IMF
  5. 5. 5 The challenges of ending poverty, undernourishment, stunting, and obesity vary across low- middle- and high-income countries 47.2 12.5 27.0 12.0 37.6 24.3 3.34.6 7.5 18.8 Low Income Middle Income High Income Poverty headcount at $1.90 a day (% of total population) Undernourishment (% of total population) Stunting of children < 5 (%) Obesity (% of total population)
  6. 6. Producers Reduce hunger Reduce hidden hunger Reduce excessive calorie intake Improve food safety Increase food availability: crop and livestock productivity, resilience, reduced taxation of agriculture Reduce food loss through improved planning and storage Low income Middle income High income Processors/post-harvest Reduce hunger Reduce hidden hunger Reduce excessive calorie intake Improve food safety Consumers Reduce hunger Reduce hidden hunger Reduce excessive calorie intake Improve food safety Improve diet quality: align producer/price policies to demand, diversification, agricultural extension, R&D for nutrient-rich crops/bio-fortification, increase income earning opportunities for women Address the misuse of pesticides, control antibiotics use in livestock/aquaculture, safe irrigation Promote food fortification, reduce subsidy biases for ingredients in processed foods Support food labelling, restrict food/beverage advertising for children, limit specific dietary factors Enhance food safety regulations, control aflatoxin, support private operator food safety management Ensure policy consistency to reduce food price volatility, support public campaigns to reduce food waste, support home grown school feeding programs Expand nutrition education and home grown school feeding, promote healthy dietary guidelines Support consumer engagement in regulatory development processes, healthy dietary guidelines, reduce subsidy biases on foods high in salt, oil and sugar and consider taxing options

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