FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop
                                                               ...
FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop
                                                               ...
FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop
                                                               ...
FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop
                                                               ...
FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop
                                                               ...
Stories from the field
    Enabling poor rural people
    to overcome poverty




                                        ...
IFAD/A. Manikowska




                                                                 businesses in poor rural communiti...
IFAD/A. Manikowska
are taking advantage of the current situation on
global markets, even though it is highly unstable.
   ...
“I work in a bank that provides credit to small rural producers,” she said. “For me, this
                                ...
Récits recueillis sur le terrain
      Oeuvrer pour que les
      populations rurales pauvres
      se libèrent de la pauv...
FIDA/A. Manikowska




                     Rosa Guamán, directrice de la coopérative   responsables qui n’ont pas encore ...
commerce équitable, et d’ignorer les marchés
locaux. Cette stratégie présente des avantages mais
aussi des risques.
    Le...
Flor Salazar, enseignante en tissage de la Fundación CholChol au Chili, travaille avec les
                               ...
Steps, Tones, and Sounds: the successful valorization of Afro Latin American
                                             ...
Steps, Tones, and Sounds: the successful valorization of Afro Latin American
                                             ...
Steps, Tones, and Sounds: the successful valorization of Afro Latin American
                                             ...
Learning Route in Green Markets

                                                                                Colombia,...
Learning Route in Green Markets

                                                                                  Colombi...
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Learning routes background documentation

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Learning routes background documentation

  1. 1. FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop th Nairobi 20th – 24 April 2009 BASIC STEPS IN THE DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A LEARNING ROUTE 23th April 2009 Ariel Halpern Procasur Regional Corporation procasur@procasur.org /ahalpern@procasur.org www.procasur.org Introduction Learning Routes: Learning and innovating from the local talents The Learning Routes are a continuous training process in field that aims to expand and diversify the local markets of technical rural services; including and giving value to the best experiences and knowledge of the institutions, associations, communities and rural families. Each Route is thematically organized around successful experiences, cases and practices in local and rural development, in which the local users and operators become facilitators. By organizing workshops, interviews, conversations and field activities, the Routes creates a space of individual and group learning for the visitors and the organizations that are being visited; they organize their learning elaborating their Innovations Plans that they aim to implement. Therefore, the impact of the Learning Routes is evaluated by its contribution to multiply and facilitate the adoption of the best solutions that expand the access of new and improved development services for the poor rural population. Objectives 1. Training of the human resources and increasing the social capital of the local organizations and the civil society 2. Creation of an efficient regional market of technical assistance services and exchange of innovative experiences. 3. Add value to the accumulated knowledge of the executing organisms, IFAD projects, and the beneficiaries’ organizations. Results Between 2006 and late 2008, the Learning Routes Programme, co-financed by IFAD and other donors, carried out 29 Learning Routes, with an average of 17 participants per route, benefiting directly 550 direct persons and indirectly around 3 300 more. On the other hand, around 170 beneficiaries associations, rural communities and local institutions supplied training services, mobilizing nearly 800 local talents, men and women that shared their knowledge and experiences fighting rural poverty. The Programme worked with 30 different nationalities and in 10 countries in LAC and Africa. GENERAL DIAGRAMM OF THE PROCESS 1 Casilla Postal n’ 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org
  2. 2. FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop th Nairobi 20th – 24 April 2009 STAGE I. TO KNOW: CONSTRUCTION AND ORGANIZATION OF ACCUMULATED OR EMPIRICAL KNOWLEDGE BY LOCAL RURAL ORGANIZATIONS. 1. Selection of the team in charge of the Route’s design. PROCASUR selects the team in charge of the technical and operational tasks for the Route’s design. A requisite profile is created, the relevant professionals are screened, and a selection process is conducted based on quality. 2. Identification of the training needs of the Route’s potential users. The aim is to identify precisely the universe of users for the services of each Learning Route, together with the specific demands for training, so as to achieve the design of one or several alternative learning processes, each one with direct user value. Through the review of current documentation, interviews with managers of projects and programs for poverty alleviation in the region, and advice from experts, relevant themes in demand by the players linked to rural development are identified. Priority is given to: i) work with professionals, technicians, partners and users of the projects in the region, and ii) the design and execution of Routes which underscore the heterogeneity of the rural world, attempting to achieve a shared diagnosis and pertinent action strategies which promote policy dialogue. 3. Selection of cases. Once the specific users are selected, the performances to be strengthened identified, and the main training needs defined, the process of selecting pedagogically relevant cases to be included in the Route as local talent training service providers begins. 1 This stage considers: i) to determine through consultation with experts the principal contents in discussions related to the topics addressed, and propose relevant experiences which are demonstrated to have user value, which can be considered state of the art; ii) define learning goals in which productive, economic, social and/or cultural working practices are detailed, and over which a positive impact is sought; iii) identify local and regional specialists on the topics of each Route as potential instructors; iv) design the itinerary of technical knowledge to be implemented, the specific activities to be carried out in each place, and the mechanisms to be applied for evaluating results, and v) operational planning of each Route, including administrative and financial aspects. 4. Systematization and preparation of the cases. Once the experience or case has become part of the activity, a process of participatory systematization is initiated in which the lessons learned, and the materials, presentations, and activities to be employed during the Route are prepared. At this stage, the protagonists of the cases reflect upon their own practices, an exercise which contributes to the construction of knowledge. The contribution of the case to the theme and the Route must be validated by experts. For the effective valorization of knowledge, the process of systematization must not be external. It should be participatory and lead to capacity building in its human resources. Through the use of basic tools of systematization and the preparation of training activities, the skills of local talents are fomented and the participation of peasant, micro entrepreneurs, and citizen’s groups in the markets for private training services and technical assistance are encouraged. 5. The selection of local and regional experts on the subject matter of each Route is a crucial task when beginning the design of training services, as is the management of updated 2 Casilla Postal n’ 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org
  3. 3. FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop th Nairobi 20th – 24 April 2009 information on key concepts and tools and on the cases which demonstrate high levels of innovation and educational potential. 6. Dissemination, convocation, and application. Activities are disseminated through PROCASUR’s Web page www.procasur.org, and through those of associated organizations, and are also published in regional media, as well as in a webfly or electronic bulletin which is sent to the directors of the organizations of potential users. Through these means the convocation is launched and the registration form and scholarship application may be downloaded, which can be returned to PROCASUR by fax, e-mail, or conventional mail. 7. User selection. To select users, the information provided in the registration form is analyzed. Applications are ranked according to basic criteria. 8. Preparation for the trip. Support is given to the cases for their final preparations and users are introduced into the thematic and operational aspects of the Route: i) activities in support of the case should be primarily concerned with the delivery of specific information about the group they will receive, such as names, ages, nationalities, memberships, and organizational expectations; assistance in the preparation of documents, presentations, and activities; the dissemination of information regarding the activities, both within the organization and outside of it, ii) the activities to prepare the user are both technical and operational. Basic documentation is delivered via e-mail and through PROCASUR’s Web page. In addition, a personal and institutional presentation is requested. This is based on a diagnostic pattern and is designed as an initial task for developing a more personalized service. On the operational side, a detailed itinerary and recommendations for each field visit are provided. STAGE II. TO KNOW HOW TO, KNOWLEDGE EN ROUTE 3 Casilla Postal n’ 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org
  4. 4. FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop th Nairobi 20th – 24 April 2009 1. Induction workshop. This is performed at the beginning of the Learning Route and offers an in-depth look at the approaches, concepts, tools, and experiences that are linked to the issues of the Route, providing a critical reflection of the practices of users and identifying their needs and expectations. Authorities knowledgeable on the theme participate, presentations relevant to the Learning Route are made, working groups are formed, and open discussions are held. It is also a motivational milestone in the implementation of the Learning Route. 2. Fieldwork. Corresponds to the field visits made to the cases previously selected, systematized, and incorporated. Representatives of these experiences have been authorized to organize the training services according to the pedagogical requirements of the users of each Route. In this way, the principal actors are the associations and peasant communities who present their experiences, answer questions, and exchange information pertinent to their activities. In addition, other local actors such as technicians, field technicians, municipal authorities, association leaders, financial operators, merchants, and small entrepreneurs who have collaborated in the implementation of the experience participate. The purpose is for users to achieve a comprehensive view of the case, identify the factors that have facilitated the processes of innovation, and examine in greater depth the results obtained. 3. Panel of experts. Complementing the field work, this is a panel that includes actors from civil society, the public and private sectors, NGOs, academia, thematic specialists, and others with knowledge relevant to the subject. 4. Workshops for the development of Innovation Plans. During the Route at least three workshops are carried out which are aimed at facilitating the adaptation of innovative products or services to the reality of users of the Learning Route. For this purpose, the Technical Coordinator has a teaching guide which covers the different parts of the trip, the participant’s return to his or her organization, and participation in the Learning Community. 5. Case Summary Workshop. This workshop aims to review the cases, study their outstanding aspects, and examine the concepts and approaches analyzed and discussed during the Induction Workshop. The activity finishes with conclusions and recommendations on the daily program, focusing on the usefulness of each experience and discussions about the performances of the users of the Route. In addition, a commitment is made to generate a series of recommendations for the local talents who participated in each Route, recommendations drawn from a review of the case conducted at the end of each workday. 6. Closing Workshop: The Route concludes with a workshop that discusses the main lessons learned during the Learning Route and the innovations available for adaptation. It provides a collective assessment of the experience and certificates of participation are awarded. 4 Casilla Postal n’ 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org
  5. 5. FIDAFRIQUE/IFADAFRICA Knowledge Management Launch Workshop th Nairobi 20th – 24 April 2009 STAGE III. CAN DO: IMPLEMENTING INNOVATIONS 1. Activities to reinforce learning. With the aim of improving the impact of training at the organizational level, activities will be undertaken to reinforce learning, as well as socialization, and the transferal of contents and the skills acquired. These activities are designed in accordance with the characteristics of each group. They are designed as activities suitable for professionals, technicians, and others with basic connectivity, and involve the implementation of a Virtual Learning Community (VLC). If the connectivity and digital literacy requirements are not met, local support activities are implemented, including in the field and distance advice. 2. Innovation Plan. The design of an Innovative Plan results in improved incorporation of learning by users through an applied exercise and also provides a concrete product for the organization. To encourage the process of reflection and dissemination of learning - the development of the plan considers stages of dissemination and validation by the community and/or organization - a contest fund has been created which co-finances the execution of the best plans, with an amount, term, and activities clearly established. 3. Systematization and dissemination of the results of the Route. Using a systematic and uniform model for all the Routes, the main lessons generated by each case are presented. In addition, the basic documentation (Log) and complementary information (Documentation Center) of the Route, including the photographic and video record, and the presentations made by participants, local talents, and the technical crew, is designed to be disseminated through PROCASUR’s Web page and in DVD form. This material is distributed to local talents with the aim of returning the results to the community, and is also provided to users and others of relevance in the rural world. 5 Casilla Postal n’ 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org
  6. 6. Stories from the field Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty IFAD/A. Manikowska ‘Learning routes’: sharing knowledge about market access in Ecuador and Peru Sharing, discussing and learning from organization specialized in building capacities for rural development – and cofinanced by IFAD. The successful and less successful routes involve visits to rural development projects experiences is the ultimate goal of all to learn about the struggles and successes small learning organizations. Since 2001, with entrepreneurs encounter when trying to start their the support of IFAD, a Latin American businesses and make them successful. This training organization specialized in rural approach is enriching both to the visitors – mainly development has promoted an innovative development professionals of various disciplines, learning approach known as ‘learning community leaders and policymakers – and their routes’. Participants of a learning route hosts, and provides opportunities for discussion on market access in poor rural territories and collective analysis. Themes of learning routes visited the business enterprises of five have included ecotourism, rural microenterprises, associations in Ecuador and Peru and rural microfinance and local development. took valuable lessons back to their own “The learning routes have been designed to fill activities and communities. a vacuum of knowledge among development practitioners and policymakers who have not yet Learning routes, known in Latin America as rutas found the answer to many basic development de aprendizaje, bring together a multidisciplinary questions,” says Ariel Halpern, coordinator of the group of rural development workers and partners learning route project at PROCASUR. in a series of thematic visits to communities that have faced development challenges. Simple questions, complex answers Photo: Members of a weavers’ association The learning routes are executed by the In March 2007, a learning route on Rural Poor talked to learning route participants about Regional Programme for Rural Development Territories and Successful Access to Dynamic the ups and downs of making their business Training (PROCASUR) – a Latin American training Markets included visits to five small-scale a success
  7. 7. IFAD/A. Manikowska businesses in poor rural communities in Ecuador • CACH, an association of weavers and Rosa Guamán, head of the Jambi Kiwa cooperative, shows participants the areas and Peru. The 18 participants from eight producers of artisanal handicrafts in rural areas where members collect and sell medicinal countries included producers’ representatives, of Chordeleg, in southern Ecuador herbs and tea development workers, market experts and • Café Femenino, an association of women members of the communities. coffee growers in Agua Azul, in the department The aim of the route was to try to determine of Cajamarca in Peru which factors make or break a poor rural • ACOPAGRO, an association of cocoa producers producer’s business. located in the valley of Huallaga Central, in the “There are no simple answers,” says Nuria jungle highlands of north-eastern Peru Felipe Soria, IFAD’s regional communication Learning from success – officer for Latin America and the Caribbean and a and from failure participant in the route. “There are many variables, including management capacities, Participants studied the successes and failures of capacity for innovation, leadership styles and the enterprises in the areas of markets and market opportunities, that determine how marketing opportunities, organization and successful a small business will be. The learning leadership, technology and innovation, and routes programme understands this complexity, business management. and that is why it takes a multidisciplinary One of the discussions among the participants approach to seeking answers and knowledge.” centred on the opportunities and constraints of fair Participants in the market access learning route trade markets. Four out of five of the communities visited the businesses of five rural associations: on the learning route chose to focus almost • Quesinor, a cheese-processing union of small exclusively on international organic and fair trade producers’ associations in the sierra norte markets without considering local markets. This of Ecuador strategy has its benefits but also its risks. • Jambi Kiwa, an association of traditional Fair trade markets usually offer higher prices, indigenous medicinal plant growers in which translate into higher profit margins and can Riobamaba, at the foot of the Chimborazo absorb small production volumes, unlike traditional volcano in central Ecuador markets. Small-scale Latin-American producers
  8. 8. IFAD/A. Manikowska are taking advantage of the current situation on global markets, even though it is highly unstable. However, the fair trade market is starting to reach the saturation point because of its popularity and the continual entrance onto the Learning route participants go through a Taking the lessons home market of small producers from all over the world. purification ceremony at Jambi Kiwa, an During interviews at the completion of the route, association of traditional indigenous participants indicated that the end of the route medicinal plant growers in Riobamaba, Recommendations for success Ecuador was actually just the beginning for them and Based on their observations and interaction with their organizations. members of the five associations, the participants Participant Cesar Visarrea is a capacity-building developed several recommendations. specialist at Consejo de Desarrollo de las Markets and marketing opportunities: Small Nacionalidades y Pueblos de Ecuador (CODENPE) rural producers should diversify their markets in Ecuador. CODENPE is a public institution rather than earmark all of their production for sale whose role is to promote the social, economic on the international solidarity market. One solution and cultural development of indigenous identities is to increase production to cater to a range of and peoples of Ecuador. markets instead of only one, even though it may “I’m particularly interested in strengthening the be the most attractive. capacity of these communities,” he said. “This Organization and leadership: Businesses that route is a great opportunity for me to learn about revolve around a specific product or skill should these experiences and about opportunities in be established by the producers themselves. If a accessing markets, so that I can then share this number of members are not producers, there knowledge with the communities we work with. should be mechanisms in place to ensure that the I was pleased to see that external partners and contribution of non-producers and producers to donors played an important role in stimulating the the business is equivalent. communities to outdo themselves and overcome Technology and innovation: Many of the market access difficulties. I think the methodology businesses analysed operate in markets that are of the route is excellent, and I would like to not yet fully formed and are not very demanding The learning route on Rural Poor develop similar thematic routes in Ecuador on or competitive, as in the case of the producers Territories and Successful Access to specific themes such as how fair trade and Dynamic Markets included visits to five of coffee and handicrafts for export. For the organic markets, bio-certification and quality small-scale businesses in poor rural others, innovation is an essential way of making communities in Ecuador and Peru requisites function. This is a work plan I’m taking a difference. away with me.” Business management: Before starting a Participant Ana Lucia Palaquibay, a financial business, no matter how small, it is necessary to advisor for Banco Solidario in Ecuador, said she develop a strategic plan and an operational plan, learned a lot about what needs to be done and and then develop mechanisms for implementing what should not be done in business management. the strategy.
  9. 9. “I work in a bank that provides credit to small rural producers,” she said. “For me, this KEY FACTS route is an excellent opportunity to better understand the realities of living in poor rural Regional Programme for Rural communities, and the challenges and difficulties poor people face when starting their own Development Training (PROCASUR) businesses.” Total cost: US$1.5 million Flor Salazar, a weaving teacher at the Fundación CholChol in Chile works with IFAD grant: US$900,000 indigenous Mapuche women, helping them develop their weaving skills and textile designs. Cofinancing: US$400,000 “I’m very interested in reconciling tradition and innovation in our textile production to participants in the programme and US$200,000 PROCASUR open up new markets for our products,” she said. “I see this route as a chance to learn Duration: 3 years how to do this. What I learned here is how other organizations with similar activities have Geographical area: Argentina, Bolivia, dealt with accessing new markets, which is my main focus at present. I will take home with Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, me a lot of what I have seen in these last 10 days.” Peru, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and Uruguay Jesús A. Pérez, a rural development expert at the Programme for the Economic Directly benefiting: 200 field Development of the Dry Region in Nicaragua, said that the main lesson he learned was how technicians, 60 farmers associations complex and difficult it is to give the correct support to people in their fight against poverty. and 400 rural organizations “As a rural development expert I work with poor farmers in the dry region of Nicaragua. Partners: IFAD projects in the region, farmers’ associations and rural I came to this route to learn about product innovation and how to introduce changes organizations in business management. In my country, there are families that have been producing the Status: ongoing same product in the same way for generations, and it’s important to me to be able to provide them with new options.” CONTACTS Louise McDonald, IFAD’s country programme manager for Swaziland, said the route was Roberto Haudry de Soucy a valuable opportunity to experience and learn about enterprise development and market Country Programme Manager, IFAD access in another region. Calle 72 No 7-82 of 702 Bogotá, Colombia “A significant difference between group formation in the two regions is the original Tel: +571 2177234 ext 200 or 202 purpose,” she said. “In Latin America most groups were formed around issues of culture Fax: 0571 2103064 and tradition and have since turned into enterprises. The organizational and planning skills E-mail: fidacolombia@cable.net.co of these groups were impressive to say the least – even over large distances – and our Raul Hopkins Regional Economist, IFAD region, Eastern and Southern Africa, could benefit from some of the lessons learned here.” Via Paolo di Dono, 44 Since 2002, a total of 40 learning routes have been implemented in six Latin American 00142 Rome, Italy countries, and in 2007 some transcontinental routes were added. At the end of 2007, Tel: +39 06 54592332 Fax: +39 06 5043463 Asian and African development experts visited 15 successful microfinance projects in Latin E-mail: r.hopkins@ifad.org America. In June 2008, the same experience was carried out in Africa. LINKS IFAD in Latin America and the Caribbean http://www.ifad.org/operations/projects/ regions/pl/index.htm Learning route on market access http://www.ruralpovertyportal.org/english/ regions/americas/rutas/index.htm PROCASUR www.procasur.org/fida Stories from the field http://www.ifad.org/story/index.htm Fernando Zelada, director of a marketing consultancy IFAD/A. Manikowska firm in Lima, analyses the marketing strategy of Quesinor, a cheese- processing union of small- scale producers Building a poverty-free world IFAD was created 30 years ago to tackle rural poverty, a key consequence of the droughts and famines of the early 1970s. Since 1978, IFAD has invested more than US$10 billion Enabling poor rural people International Fund for to overcome poverty Agricultural Development in low-interest loans and grants that have helped over 300 million very poor rural women Via Paolo di Dono, 44 and men increase their incomes and provide for their families. 00142 Rome, Italy Tel.: +39 0654591 September 2008 IFAD is an international financial institution and a specialized United Nations agency. Fax: +39 065043463 E-mail: ifad@ifad.org It is a global partnership of OECD, OPEC and other developing countries. Today, IFAD www.ifad.org supports more than 200 programmes and projects in 84 developing countries. www.ruralpovertyportal.org
  10. 10. Récits recueillis sur le terrain Oeuvrer pour que les populations rurales pauvres se libèrent de la pauvreté FIDA/A. Manikowska “Itinéraires d’apprentissage”: partager les savoirs sur l’accès au marché en Équateur et au Pérou Partager, débattre et tirer des communautés ayant été confrontées à des problèmes de développement. enseignements d’expériences heureuses Les itinéraires d’apprentissage sont mis en et moins heureuses, tel est l’objectif œuvre par le Programme régional de formation fondamental de toute organisation au développement rural (PROCASUR) – une d’apprentissage. Depuis 2001, avec organisation de formation latino-américaine l’appui du FIDA, une organisation de spécialisée dans le renforcement des capacités formation latino-américaine spécialisée pour le développement rural – et sont cofinancés en développement rural promeut une par le FIDA. Les itinéraires prévoient des visites de approche d’apprentissage novatrice projets de développement rural pour écouter les connue sous le nom d’“itinéraires petits entrepreneurs parler des luttes et des succès d’apprentissage”. Les participants à un qui ont marqué le lancement de leur activité et itinéraire d’apprentissage portant sur de leurs efforts pour la faire prospérer. Cette l’accès au marché dans les territoires approche, enrichissante tant pour les visiteurs – ruraux pauvres ont visité les entreprises essentiellement des spécialistes du développement de cinq associations en Équateur issus de diverses disciplines, des dirigeants et au Pérou et en ont ramené des communautaires et de hauts responsables – enseignements précieux pour leurs que pour leurs hôtes, favorise la discussion et l’analyse collective. Les thèmes des itinéraires propres activités et communautés. d’apprentissage ont couvert l’écotourisme, les microentreprises rurales, la microfinance rurale Les itinéraires d’apprentissage, connus en Amérique et le développement local. latine sous le nom de rutas de aprendizaje, Photo: Les membres d’une association de tisserandes évoquent, pour les participants à “Les itinéraires d’apprentissage ont été conçus rassemblent un groupe multidisciplinaire l’itinéraire d’apprentissage, les hauts et les bas pour pallier l’insuffisance des connaissances des d’intervenants et de partenaires du développement ayant jalonné l’histoire de leur entreprise rural pour une série de visites thématiques dans des praticiens du développement et des hauts aujourd’hui prospère.
  11. 11. FIDA/A. Manikowska Rosa Guamán, directrice de la coopérative responsables qui n’ont pas encore trouvé de Les participants à l’itinéraire d’apprentissage Jambi Kiwa, montre aux participants les réponse à bon nombre de questions de fond dans sur l’accès au marché se sont rendus dans les zones où les membres collectent et le domaine du développement”, déclare Ariel entreprises de cinq associations rurales: vendent des plantes médicinales et des Halpern, coordonnateur du projet des itinéraires • Quesinor, une union d’associations de petits tisanes. d’apprentissage au sein du PROCASUR. producteurs fabriquant du fromage dans la Sierra norte, en Équateur Des questions simples, des • Jambi Kiwa, une association de producteurs de réponses complexes plantes médicinales autochtones traditionnelles En mars 2007, l’itinéraire d’apprentissage de Riobamba, au pied du volcan Chimborazo, “Territoires ruraux pauvres et accès réussi à des dans le centre de l’Équateur marchés dynamiques” a prévu la visite de • CACH, une association de tisserands et de cinq petites entreprises de communautés rurales producteurs d’articles artisanaux dans les zones pauvres en Équateur et au Pérou. Les rurales de Chordeleg, dans le sud de l’Équateur 18 participants provenant de huit pays étaient • Café Femenino, une association de productrices des représentants de producteurs, des agents de café d’Agua Azul, dans le département de du développement, des experts du marché Cajamarca au Pérou et des membres de communautés. • ACOPAGRO, une association de producteurs de L’objectif de l’itinéraire était de tenter d’identifier cacao de la vallée de Huallaga Central, dans la les facteurs susceptibles de favoriser ou, au jungle des hauts plateaux du nord-est du Pérou. contraire, de couler une entreprise de petits Tirer les enseignements des succès – producteurs ruraux pauvres. et des échecs “Il n’existe pas de réponse simple”, déclare Nuria Felipe Soria, chargée de la communication régionale Les participants se sont penchés sur les succès et pour l’Amérique latine et les Caraïbes au FIDA et les échecs des entreprises dans les domaines participante à l’itinéraire. “Il y a de nombreuses suivants: possibilités d’accès au marché et créneaux variables, par exemple les capacités de gestion, commerciaux, organisation et exercice de l’autorité, l’aptitude à l’innovation, les styles d’exercice de technologie et innovation, et gestion de l’entreprise. l’autorité et les créneaux commerciaux, qui influent L’un des débats entre les participants a porté sur sur le succès futur d’une petite entreprise. Le les perspectives et les contraintes des marchés du programme des itinéraires d’apprentissage tient commerce équitable. Quatre des cinq communautés compte de cette complexité, et c’est pourquoi il de l’itinéraire d’apprentissage ont choisi de cibler adopte une approche multidisciplinaire pour dégager quasi exclusivement les circuits internationaux des des réponses et des savoirs.” produits issus de l’agriculture biologique et du
  12. 12. commerce équitable, et d’ignorer les marchés locaux. Cette stratégie présente des avantages mais aussi des risques. Les marchés du commerce équitable, qui offrent généralement des prix plus élevés, se traduisent par des marges bénéficiaires plus importantes et peuvent absorber de petits volumes de production, à la différence des marchés traditionnels. Les petits producteurs latino-américains profitent de la situation actuelle sur les marchés mondiaux, même si celle-ci est extrêmement instable. Toutefois, en raison de sa popularité et de l’arrivée continuelle sur le marché de petits producteurs du monde entier, le marché du commerce équitable commence à frôler la saturation. FIDA/A. Manikowska Recommandations pour réussir Forts de leurs observations et de l’interaction avec les membres des cinq associations, les participants ont élaboré plusieurs recommandations. Marchés et créneaux commerciaux: Les petits Desarrollo de las Nacionalidades y Pueblos de Les participants à l’itinéraire d’apprentissage sont soumis à une producteurs ruraux devraient diversifier leurs Ecuador (CODENPE), en Équateur. Le CODENPE est cérémonie de purification pendant leur marchés au lieu d’affecter toute leur production une institution publique dont le rôle est de promouvoir visite à Jambi Kiwa, une association au marché de la solidarité internationale. Une le développement social, économique et culturel des de producteurs de plantes médicinales autochtones traditionnelles de Riobamba, solution consiste à accroître la production pour identités et peuples autochtones de l’Équateur. en Équateur. approvisionner une gamme de marchés au lieu “Je m’intéresse en particulier au renforcement d’un seul, même si celui-ci est le plus attractif. des capacités de ces communautés,” explique-t-il. Organisation et exercice de l’autorité: Les “Cet itinéraire me donne une excellente occasion de entreprises fondées sur un produit ou une m’informer sur les expériences et les possibilités compétence spécifique devraient être établies par d’accès aux marchés afin de pouvoir transmettre les producteurs eux-mêmes. Si certains membres ensuite ces connaissances aux communautés avec ne sont pas producteurs, il faudrait mettre en place lesquelles nous travaillons. J’ai été heureux de des mécanismes en mesure de garantir que la constater que les partenaires et donateurs extérieurs contribution des non-producteurs et des producteurs jouaient un rôle important en stimulant les à la marche des activités soit équivalente. communautés afin qu’elles se surpassent et Technologie et innovation: Bon nombre des surmontent les difficultés d’accès aux marchés. Je entreprises analysées opèrent sur des marchés pense que la méthodologie des itinéraires est encore en devenir, ni très exigeants ni très remarquable et j’aimerais créer des itinéraires concurrentiels, comme c’est le cas pour les thématiques similaires en Équateur sur des thèmes producteurs de café et d’artisanat destinés à spécifiques tels que le mode de fonctionnement des l’exportation. Pour les autres, l’innovation est un marchés du commerce équitable et des produits moyen essentiel de marquer des points. issus de l’agriculture biologique, de la biocertification Gestion des affaires: Avant de lancer une et des normes de qualité. C’est un plan de travail entreprise, aussi petite soit-elle, il est nécessaire que j’emporte avec moi.” L’itinéraire d’apprentissage “Territoires d’élaborer un plan stratégique et un plan Ana Lucia Palaquibay (participante), conseillère ruraux pauvres et accès réussi à des opérationnel, puis de concevoir les mécanismes financière au Banco Solidario en Équateur, déclare marchés dynamiques” prévoyait la visite permettant la mise en œuvre de la stratégie. qu’elle a beaucoup appris sur ce qu’il faut faire et ne de cinq petites entreprises de pas faire en matière de gestion des entreprises. communautés rurales pauvres en Équateur et au Pérou. Rapporter les enseignements chez soi “Je travaille dans une banque qui offre du crédit Au cours des entretiens clôturant l’itinéraire, les aux petits producteurs ruraux,” déclare-t-elle. “Pour participants ont précisé que la fin de l’itinéraire moi, cet itinéraire est une excellente occasion de n’était, en fait, que le commencement pour eux et mieux comprendre les réalités de la vie des leurs organisations. communautés rurales pauvres, et les défis et les Cesar Visarrea (participant) est un spécialiste du difficultés rencontrés par les pauvres quand ils renforcement des capacités auprès du Consejo de lancent leur propre entreprise.”
  13. 13. Flor Salazar, enseignante en tissage de la Fundación CholChol au Chili, travaille avec les PRINCIPALES CARACTÉRISTIQUES femmes mapuche autochtones en les aidant à perfectionner leur art du tissage et à diversifier Programme régional de formation au les modèles de tissu. développement rural (PROCASUR) “Je suis très intéressée par la façon de concilier tradition et innovation dans notre production Coût total: 1,5 million d’USD textile dans la perspective d’ouvrir de nouveaux débouchés pour nos produits,” déclare-t-elle. Prêt du FIDA: 900 000 USD “Je considère que cet itinéraire m’a donné la chance d’apprendre comment y parvenir. J’ai Cofinancement: 400 000 USD des appris ici comment d’autres organisations conduisant des activités similaires ont réussi à participants au programme et 200 000 prendre pied sur de nouveaux marchés, ce qui est mon souci principal à l’heure actuelle. Je USD du PROCASUR rapporte avec moi beaucoup de ce que j’ai vu ces 10 derniers jours.” Durée: 3 ans Jesús A. Pérez, expert du développement rural dans le programme de développement Couverture géographique: Argentine, Bolivie, Brésil, Colombie, Équateur, économique dans la région aride du Nicaragua, explique que le principal enseignement qu’il a Paraguay, Pérou, République tiré est combien il est complexe et difficile de fournir un appui adéquat aux personnes qui bolivarienne du Venezuela et Uruguay luttent contre la pauvreté. Bénéficiaires directs: 200 techniciens “En tant qu’expert du développement rural, je travaille avec les agriculteurs pauvres dans la de terrain, 60 associations paysannes et 400 organisations rurales région aride du Nicaragua. J’ai participé à cet itinéraire pour m’informer sur l’innovation au niveau Partenaires: les projets du FIDA dans la des produits et sur la façon d’introduire des changements dans la gestion des entreprises. Dans région, les associations paysannes et les mon pays, il y a des familles qui font le même produit de la même façon depuis des générations, organisations rurales et il est important pour moi de pouvoir leur proposer de nouvelles options.” État d’avancement: en cours Selon Louise McDonald, chargée de programme de pays du FIDA pour le Swaziland, l’itinéraire lui a donné une occasion précieuse de découvrir le développement des entreprises et l’accès au marché dans une autre région et d’en tirer des leçons. PERSONNES À CONTACTER Roberto Haudry de Soucy “Une différence importante au niveau de la formation des groupements dans les deux Chargé de programme de pays, FIDA régions est l’objectif initial,” observe-t-elle. “En Amérique latine, la plupart des groupements se Calle 72 n° 7-82 de 702 sont constitués autour de caractéristiques culturelles et de traditions avant de se muer en Bogotá, Colombie entreprises. Les capacités d’organisation et de planification de ces groupements sont, pour le Tél: +571 2177234 poste 200 ou 202 moins, impressionnantes – même sur de grandes distances – et notre région, l’Afrique orientale Télécopie: +571 2103064 Courriel: fidacolombia@cable.net.co et australe, pourrait mettre à profit certains des enseignements tirés ici.” Raul Hopkins Depuis 2002, 40 itinéraires d’apprentissage au total ont été mis en œuvre dans six pays Économiste régional, FIDA d’Amérique latine et, en 2007, des itinéraires transcontinentaux y ont été ajoutés. Fin 2007, des Via Paolo di Dono, 44 experts du développement asiatiques et africains ont rendu visite à 15 projets de microfinance 00142 Rome, Italie performants en Amérique latine. En juin 2008, la même expérience a été réalisée en Afrique. Tél: +39 06 54592332 Télécopie: +39 06 5043463 Courriel: r.hopkins@ifad.org LIENS Le FIDA en Amérique latine et aux Caraïbes http://www.ifad.org/operations/projects/ regions/pl/index.htm Itinéraire d’apprentissage sur l’accès au marché http://www.ruralpovertyportal.org/english/ regions/americas/rutas/index.htm PROCASUR www.procasur.org/fida Sur le terrain Fernando Zelada, directeur d’une FIDA/A. Manikowska http://www.ifad.org/story/index.htm société de conseil en marketing à Lima, analyse la stratégie commerciale de Quesinor, une union de petits producteurs fabriquant du fromage. Bâtir un monde libéré de la pauvreté Le FIDA a été créé il y 30 ans pour s’attaquer à la pauvreté rurale, principale conséquence des sécheresses et des famines du début des années 70. Depuis 1978, le FIDA a investi plus de 10 milliards d’USD sous forme de prêts à faible taux d’intérêt et de dons, aidant ainsi plus de Oeuvrer pour que les Fonds international de populations rurales pauvres développement agricole 300 millions de femmes et d’hommes vivant dans une grande pauvreté en milieu rural à Via libèrent de la pauvreté se Paolo di Dono, 44 accroître leurs revenus et à faire vivre leur famille. 00142 Rome, Italie Tél.: +39 06 54591 Le FIDA est une institution financière internationale et une institution spécialisée des Septembre 2008 Télécopie: +39 06 5043463 Nations Unies. Il représente un partenariat mondial entre l’OCDE, l’OPEP et d’autres pays Courriel: ifad@ifad.org en développement. Le Fonds soutient actuellement plus de 200 programmes et projets dans www.ifad.org 84 pays en développement. www.ruralpovertyportal.org
  14. 14. Steps, Tones, and Sounds: the successful valorization of Afro Latin American music as a cultural asset in rural contexts 16 to 23 April, Colombia Learning Route Steps, Tones, and Sounds: the successful valorization of Afro Latin American music as a cultural asset in rural contexts 16 to 23 April, Colombia WHAT IS A LEARNING ROUTE? The Learning Route is a training methodology of an experiential nature, which provides opportunities for exchange, reflection, and analysis in an on-going learning process. During the Route, testimonies are shared and all of the actors involved in the cases studied participate in the experience. The Route developed by the ACUA Program and PROCASUR Regional Corporation fits into the theme of bringing value and recognition to cultural expressions, specifically musical, as assets for the development of the rural territories of Afro-descendant communities in Latin American included in the Program (Brazil, Bolivia, Columbia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru and Venezuela), by generating associated abilities and skills for local management. During the Route, participants will visit and exchange lessons learned with rural afro descendent musical groups who have been successful in bringing value and recognition to cultural assets, and where the local administration, in conjunction with other important players, has led to better income opportunities and an improved quality of life in the African- descendant communities where these kinds of experiences are located. The Route is organized and implemented within the framework of strategies developed by the Program Support for Rural Populations of African Descent in Latin America - ACUA - which is focused on providing value and recognition of their cultural expressions and assets, as well as fomenting closer links among and between networks and Afro peoples of the region, by achieving the following fundamental aims: i) develop the territory on the basis of cultural identity, ii) improve the quality of life of rural communities of African descent, and iii) strengthen the identity of communities through the formation of social networks, including the consolidation of regional institutions which seek an exchange of knowledge and experience among communities. WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THIS LEARNING ROUTE? Transfer to Afro rural leaders/developers of organizations and groups/communities included in the ACUA Program’s area of coverage the skills to develop processes for valorization of music as a cultural asset, so as to improve their capacities to manage, in a collective, sustainable and replicable way, within their areas of activity, actions to improve the quality of life and alleviate poverty in their territories. 1 Casilla Postal nº 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org
  15. 15. Steps, Tones, and Sounds: the successful valorization of Afro Latin American music as a cultural asset in rural contexts 16 to 23 April, Colombia WHAT ARE THE RESULTS OF THIS LEARNING ROUTE? It is expected that participants of this Route can: 1. Identify the cultural assets of their associations and communities, on three reference levels (potential, in development, and sustained). 2. Exchange experiences with peers (hosts and fellow participants of the Route) and capture their experiences, lessons and recommendations – emphasizing the development of innovations - to improve their management skills in association with other groups so as to expand opportunities for valorization of their cultural assets potential. 3. Systematize the lessons learned in terms of processes for cultural valorization (identity, heritage, territorial, and commercial). 4. Communicate their experience during the Route to other members of their organizations and communities, in order to trigger processes identified as valuable and likely to be replicated in their territories for the valorization of music as a cultural asset. WHAT TOPICS WILL BE ADDRESSED? 1. Particularities of afro Latin-American music in rural contexts relating to identity and territorial issues. 2. The potential of Afro-Latin American music to become an asset in sustained local development. 3. Specific characteristics of the music industry, with emphasis on the channels for broadcast and marketing, the legal and regulatory framework relating to intellectual property rights and the relevant public and private actors. 4. The chain of processes for the valorization of cultural activities: music as a dynamic springboard ie. as an activity capable of attracting market demand for other cultural manifestations. 5. Obstacles, innovative solutions, and the principal challenges for local administration of cultural manifestations, with particular emphasis on music. WHAT EXPERIENCES WILL WE VISIT? The Route will visit eight outstanding experiences in the valorization of Afro Latin American music as a cultural asset. Located in the Pacific region of Columbia, each experience will contribute relevant and novel elements relating to the central theme of the Route, and in accordance with their specific territorial, identity, and experiential characteristics. The learning itinerary will allow participants to study different experiences of the valorization of music as an asset for local development, through the development of learning and collective reflection of innovative and successful strategies with emphasis on the novel solution of obstacles, as well as visualizing future opportunities. HOW LONG DOES THE ROUTE LAST AND WHEN WILL IT TAKE PLACE? The Learning Route lasts eight days and will be held between June 16 to 23, 2009. 2 Casilla Postal nº 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org
  16. 16. Steps, Tones, and Sounds: the successful valorization of Afro Latin American music as a cultural asset in rural contexts 16 to 23 April, Colombia WHO CAN PARTICIPATE? The Learning Route has 18 places for managers and generators of cultural activities, and leaders of rural Afro descent, who will be selected according to the following criteria: 1. Local leaders, cultural managers and/or musical creators of Afro descent, with a proven track record in their chosen field. 2. Afro descendents who represent organizations with experience of at least two years in the valorization of Afro Latin-American music as a cultural asset. 3. Women of Afro descent who are local leaders, cultural and/or musical managers or generators. 4. Young people of Afro descent who are local leaders, cultural and/or musical managers or generators. Application is open to Afro descendents from Africa and those countries included in the ACUA Program, namely Brazil, Bolivia, Columbia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela. It should also be noted that six places are contemplated for Columbian nationals and 12 for nationals of the other above-mentioned countries. Conditions for application require applicants to: 1. Complete and submit the application form before Wednesday April 30, 2009 (email afrosrurales@procasur.org). 2. Submit an overview of up to two pages detailing previous experiences relevant to the themes of the Route. 3. Provide a sponsoring letter form the organization/musical group/community to which you belong. WHAT ARE THE COMMITMENTS OF THE PARTICIPANTS? 1. Review prior to the commencement of the Route the proposed educational content and participate actively in each and every activity that the Route entails, both during the preparation of the Route, while the Route is being carried out, and following its termination. 2. Design an innovation plan during the Route, and concentrate your efforts on implementing it, taking into consideration activities for the dissemination of lessons learned. The plan is a proposal to improve the management of your group/organization/community in the association with other groups, and in relation to the valorization of music as a sustainable cultural asset for local development, based on learning acquired during the Route. It is important to note that there will be a competition for the co-funding of the best ideas. 3. Participate actively in initiating and promoting actions of regional co-ordination among the organizations/groups/communities involved in the Route which respond to shared goals, as well as with other relevant associations/institutions. For additional information, write to: afrorural@procasur.org. 3 Casilla Postal nº 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org
  17. 17. Learning Route in Green Markets Colombia, May 17 to 24, 2009 CALL Learning Route in Green Markets Colombia May 17 to 24, 2009 WHAT IS A LEARNING ROUTE? It is an in situ experience involving an on-going training process, organized thematically around successful cases and best practices in biotrade and biobusiness. The Route is highlighted by the learning and testimonials from its users and makes possible the active participation of the actors directly involved in the development of each experience, who become the training service providers. The Learning Route in Green Markets will enhance participants' knowledge on the sustainable use of biodiversity and its connection to productive development, with criteria for environmental, social, and economic sustainability as alternatives to greater and better development for the rural poor. WHAT IS THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS LEARNING ROUTE? Foster exchange and reflection on practices and processes in order to convert knowledge and experience into socialassets that improve living conditions in rural communities. The Route is an opportunity to see things from a different perspective, within a cultural context and with production and commercial processes that provide more effective ways of doing things. WHAT ARE THE EXPECTED RESULTS OF THE LEARNING ROUTE? Internalized in small and medium-sized enterprises or marketing institutions the sustainable management of natural resources, the revaluing of social and cultural assets allowing for the sustainable development of the rural poor. Users are expected to achieve: 1. Assess the knowledge of players who take advantage of and use in a sustainable way Colombian biodiversity. 2. Increase knowledge about sustainable use of biodiversity and its connection with the productive development, with criteria for environmental, social, and economic sustainability. 3. Identify investment opportunities with organizations working in green markets, 4. Use the acquired learning to design an Innovation Plan in which solutions analyzed during the Route are creatively adapted to the diagnosis of participant’s own needs, conditions, and opportunities. 5. Contrast critically the contextual and internal elements of the case studies to identify the internal and external factors that make a green market organization successful. 6. Establish the difference between biobusiness and BioTrade. 1 Casilla Postal nº 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org
  18. 18. Learning Route in Green Markets Colombia, May 17 to 24, 2009 WHICH EXPERIENCES WILL BE STUDIED? Successful cases are selected for this Route, all with recognized trajectory and clear evidence of impact on the sustainable use of biodiversity in Colombia, including following areas: 1. Models of partnership and resource management 2. Investment in areas of socio-cultural and environmental conflict. 3. Good agricultural practices with results in productivity. 4. Businesses structured around native biodiversity. 5. Innovation for product development (diversification, packaging, bar code, etc.). 6. Marketing strategies. 7. The relationship between research, technological development and sustainable use of biodiversity products. 8. Community monitoring of environmental impacts. WHEN WILL IT TAKE PLACE? The Route will take place between May 17 and 24, 2009. WHO CAN PARTICIPATE? This Route is aimed at professionals of projects, companies or institutions that could potentially: (i) provide services to this kind of community/initiatives; (ii) purchase its products, or (iii) invest in building their business plans. CONDITIONS OF APPLICATION: 1. Complete and submit the entry form. 2. Submit a description of up to two pages of your previous experience in matters relating to the theme of the Route. HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO PARTICIPATE? The organizers of the Route on Green Markets will cover all costs relating to: 1. Transportation: The cost of all ground and air transfers required from the beginning to the end of the Route 2. Accommodation and meals required during the execution of the route. Pedagogical materials. 3. Insurance required by the participants. 4. Training materials for activities and experiences to be visited. Participants have to cover costs of travel to the Route and back and other personal expenses. ENQUIRIES For inquiries please contact: Ariel Halpern: ahalpern@procasur.org Phone: (56-2) 341 63 67) www.procasur.org / www.accionambiental.org 2 Casilla Postal nº 599, Ñuñoa, Santiago de Chile (+56-2) 3416367 / www.procasur.org / procasur@procasur.org

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