Thomas Lanier Williams
Born

March 26, 1911
Columbus, Mississippi, United States

Died

February 25, 1983 (aged 71)
New Yo...
 Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is a play by Tennessee

Williams. It was produced by the Playwrights’
Company. One of Williams's b...
 Cat on a Hot Tin Roof features several recurring

motifs, such as social mores, greed,
superficiality, mendacity, decay,...
 In cat on a hot tin of roof, Tennesse William described

him self to this drama by Brick’s Character.
 Brick embodies a...
 Brick's brokenness is materialized in his injury, a

broken ankle incurred while jumping hurdles on the
high school athl...
Background analysis
 Williams, like many other authors of his time, wrote

about the decade according to his personal
exp...
 During the 1950s women were conditioned to find their

worth in marriage and creating a sound family structure.
 The wo...
 . In the case of Maggie and Brick, he reminds her they are







simply living together and married only by name.
S...
 According

to the 1950s society, it was that
characteristic that made her even more beautiful.
Some modern feminists, fr...
Cat on a hot tin of roof
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Cat on a hot tin of roof

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the intrinsics of drama Cat On a hot tin roof

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Cat on a hot tin of roof

  1. 1. Thomas Lanier Williams Born March 26, 1911 Columbus, Mississippi, United States Died February 25, 1983 (aged 71) New York City, New York, United States Parents Edwina and Cornelius Coffin
  2. 2.  Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is a play by Tennessee Williams. It was produced by the Playwrights’ Company. One of Williams's best-known works and his personal favorite, the play won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1955. Set in the "plantation home in the Mississipi Delta of Big Daddy Pollitt, a wealthy cotton tycoon, the play examines the relationships among members of Big Daddy's family, primarily between his son Brick and Maggie the "Cat", Brick's wife.
  3. 3.  Cat on a Hot Tin Roof features several recurring motifs, such as social mores, greed, superficiality, mendacity, decay, sexual desire, repression, and death.  Much of the pathos found in Williams’s drama was mined from the playwright’s own life. One of them is in cat on a hot tin of roof.  Alcoholism, depression, thwarted desire, loneliness, and insanity were all part of Williams’s world.  His experience as a known homosexual in an era unfriendly to homosexuality also informed his work
  4. 4.  In cat on a hot tin of roof, Tennesse William described him self to this drama by Brick’s Character.  Brick embodies an almost archetypal masculinity, that of the self-possessed, self-contained, untouchable, and phallically intact man
  5. 5.  Brick's brokenness is materialized in his injury, a broken ankle incurred while jumping hurdles on the high school athletic field. In a sense, it is an injury incurred out of nostalgia for the early days of his friendship with Skipper, the time of what Maggie describes as their Greek legend. This injury, a wound in his otherwise intact masculinity, is also a figure for his castration, the unmanning implied in homosexual desire.
  6. 6. Background analysis  Williams, like many other authors of his time, wrote about the decade according to his personal experiences with women. His own accounts with women dealt with sensitivity to the way his mother and sister were treated by his father. “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” has extreme undertones of emotional, sexual, and spiritual need that are apparent in his character “Maggie the Cat”.
  7. 7.  During the 1950s women were conditioned to find their worth in marriage and creating a sound family structure.  The women in Williams’ play are portrayed as very dependent creatures with a variety of characteristics, each in their own very different but all three tied by the constraints of society.  Women were to marry, and no matter how miserable they were treated, they were to please their husbands.  There was also a tendency for women to stay in meaningless marriages because divorce was not supported by social standards.
  8. 8.  . In the case of Maggie and Brick, he reminds her they are     simply living together and married only by name. She seems to be in constant torture because she cannot experience intimacy (be it physical or emotional) with the man in which she has vowed the rest of her life to. It is obvious Brick does not appreciate the devotion of Maggie. He is in a state of denial about life (and his possible sexual orientation and attraction to Skipper) and has degraded Maggie since the beginning of the relationship. He also expresses how amazed he is that Maggie could possibly want to have a child with a man that hates her. Despite his abuse, Maggie stays married to a man who does not want her.
  9. 9.  According to the 1950s society, it was that characteristic that made her even more beautiful. Some modern feminists, from the 1960s (and even the late 1950s) to present day, would consider her weak but the pure fact that she could survive in that environment of moral decay is exasperating and courageous. Women need other women to confide in and to help take a stand, women in numbers are powerful; however, Big Mama and Mae are no help to Maggie. She is on alone for the duration of the play and cannot leave Brick because of her devotion and her dependency to his family.

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