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Global trends in Online, Open and Flexible education

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This presentation was held at the International Conference on Open and Distance learning for Sustainable Development in Agriculture - ODLSDA 2016 in Coimbatore, India. The conference was hosted by Tamil Nadu Agricultural University. The presentation focuses on global trends but with a specific perspective of India and its potential and challenges in the development of digital transformation of education.

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Global trends in Online, Open and Flexible education

  1. 1. Global Trends in Online, Open and Flexible Education Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Adviser International Council for Open and Distance Education 25 November 2016, ODLSDA Coimbatore 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 1
  2. 2. • ICDE is the leading global network for making quality learning accessible throughout the world using online, open, distance and flexible education. • We connect institutions, organisations and professionals from across the globe so that they can share ideas, resources and best practices, partner on major projects and advocate together. • We are the official partner of UNESCO, that shares that agency’s key aim – the attainment of quality education for all • ICDE believes that in pursuing education as a universal right, the needs of the learner must be central. 25 Years Support From Norway Who are we? Partner with UNESCO 50 years 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 2
  3. 3. ”TOWARDS INCLUSIVE AND EQUITABLE QUALITY EDUCATION AND LIFELONG LEARNING FOR ALL” Sustainable Development Goal 4 Education 2030 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 3
  4. 4. Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education) and Vice- President, RMIT, Australia Open, Transparent, Accountable and focus on good governance President: 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 4
  5. 5. Key role of ICDE 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 5 Membership organization Network, services and knowledge ProjectsEvents Policy work
  6. 6. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 6
  7. 7. Projects and initiatives 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 7
  8. 8. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 8
  9. 9. Insight papers and curated resources 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 9
  10. 10. India in the World Some indicators and trends 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 10
  11. 11. • Global indicators – India • Opportunities and growth • Reaching the potential through technology 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 11
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  13. 13. http://reports.weforum.org/global- competitiveness-report-2015-2016/ 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 13
  14. 14. India has climbed from rank 71 to 55 in one year A major shift in the world’s economic balance of power, from Europe and United States towards Asia – and India contributes significantly 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 14
  15. 15. 5 opportunities for growth and transformation in India • Acceptable living standards for all Indians • Sustainable urbanisation • Manufacturing for India, in India • Harnessing technology for India’s growth • Unlocking the potential of women Source: http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/employment-and-growth/indias-ascent-five-opportunities-for- growth-and-transformation 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 15
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  17. 17. But there are some challenges: • Bridge the urban-rural divide • Digital infrastructure • Computer literacy • Shift in competencies and skills 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 17
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  20. 20. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 20
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  22. 22. Perceptions of the use of technology in teaching and learning Has the world changed? Has education changed? 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 22
  23. 23. Student device ownership history, with 2016 projections http://www.educause.edu/ecar
  24. 24. Faculty views on mobile technology in the classroom
  25. 25. Faculty in-class BYOD policies and practices
  26. 26. Where the Digital Economy Is Moving the Fastest Bhaskar Chakravorti Christopher Tunnard Ravi Shankar Chaturvedi FEBRUARY 19, 2015 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 26
  27. 27. Focus: Higher Education 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 27
  28. 28. Mega trends: • Globalisation • Disruptive technologies • Demographics 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 28
  29. 29. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8B G3KOexi8 Example: Pepper, Watson 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 29 https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=cognitive+technologies+a nd+education&&view=detail&mid=4FDFBA52BEB89D240AE14FDFB A52BEB89D240AE1&FORM=VRDGAR
  30. 30. «We think cognitive technologies will fuel the digital transformation as the damp machine fuelled the industrial revolution». – IBM Norway. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 30
  31. 31. Eduational Trends – as observed by ICDE - 1/2 1. Open and distance learning is now going mainstream 2. Digital transformation is challenging the relevance of educational institutions all over the world 3. New developments as OER and MOOCs are fueling innovation in education 4. New methodologies; learning analytics, Big Data, and new online education systems, enable a shift to adapted, personalized learning and assessment. 5. Education is on the brink of a revolution caused by convergence of research. Education, Cognitive Psychology and Neuroscience: powerful advances in optimizing online learning experiences. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 31
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  35. 35. “Specialist ODL institutions have achieved so much over the past few decades. As demand for higher education surges worldwide, the ODL vision of accessible, low-cost, high-quality provision has never been more relevant. Renewed determination amongst specialist ODL institutions to benchmark student performance and institutional productivity, with fresh inspiration from new competition and delivery models, will take this precious legacy to new heights.” 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 35
  36. 36. New technologies and the potential for education: 1: Learning Analytics “Learning Analytics is the emerging field defined as “the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs” (Long & Siemens, 2011) 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 36
  37. 37. Learning analytics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUOrlp6AZ8E “enormous potential to improve the student experience at university” JISC, UK • As a tool for quality assurance and quality improvement • As a tool for boosting retention rates • As a tool for assessing and acting upon differential outcomes among the student population • As an enabler for the development and introduction of adaptive learning https://vimeo.com/105802864 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 37
  38. 38. Student interest in IPAS features ”Integrated Planning and Advising Services (IPAS) ” http:// www.educause.edu/ecar
  39. 39. http://www.policyconnect.org.uk/hec/research/report-bricks-clicks-potential-data-and-analytics-higher-education The Open University, UK, policy The UK Higher Education Commission 2016 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 39
  40. 40. New technologies and the potential for education: 2: Open Educational Resources (OER) “Open Educational Resources (OERs) are any type of educational materials that are in the public domain or introduced with an open license. The nature of these open materials means that anyone can legally and freely copy, use, adapt and re-share them.” UNESCO, http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/access-to-knowledge/open-educational- resources/what-are-open-educational-resources-oers/ 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 40
  41. 41. Key potentials of OER • Digital technologies have become ubiquitous in daily life and OER can harness the new possibility afforded by digital technology to address common educational challenges. • OER are a catalyst for social innovation, which can facilitate changed forms of interaction between teachers, learners and knowledge. • OER have an extended lifecycle beyond their original design and purpose. The process of distribution, adaptation and iteration can improve access to high-quality, context- appropriate educational materials for all.” http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/content/book/9789264247543-en01 Dec 201511.05.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 41
  42. 42. New technologies and the potential for education: 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 42 Has the world changed? Will education change?
  43. 43. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 43
  44. 44. 6. Lack of resources or lack of understanding of the concept of online, open and flexible education 7. Skills and the relation education – employment – lifelong learning is required 8. Quality, quality enhancement and accreditation become top priority issues. Trends – as observed by ICDE - 2/2 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 44
  45. 45. Indian education in the world • Higher Education in India – vision 2030 http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Higher-education-in-India-Vision-2030/%24FILE/EY-Higher-education-in-India- Vision-2030.pdf 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 45
  46. 46. Demographics – India “By 2030, India will be amongst the youngest nations in the world. With nearly 140 million people in the college-going age group, one in every four graduates in the world will be a product of the Indian higher education system. By 2030, the already existing challenges for Indian higher education – access, equity and quality – will only be greatly exacerbated unless we significantly transform our higher education model.” (Higher Education In India: Vision 2030) 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 46
  47. 47. Suggested solutions (India Vision 2030) • A student-centric, learning driven pedagogical model • A differentiated three-tiered university system • The effective use of technology 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 47
  48. 48. Intensive use of technology is a requirement • The need for scalability of education is unimaginable without intensive use of ICT • But be careful: “the MOOC way” is not the only way 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 48
  49. 49. What is a MOOC? A Massive Open Online Course (MOOC /muːk/) is an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the web.[1] In addition to traditional course materials such as filmed lectures, readings, and problem sets, many MOOCs provide interactive user forums to support community interactions among students, professors, and teaching assistants (Wikipedia) 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 49
  50. 50. What characterizes MOOCs? • Mostly non formal education (no credits) • Little student support • Mostly used by already highly educated people • High drop out rates • Providers struggle to find sustainable business models, e.g through “freemium models” 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 50
  51. 51. Then what is the solution? A fundamental change in pedagogical approach in line with efficient use of digital methodologies is recommended: blended learning, flipped learning, personalized, adaptive…. (This is also in line with what India Vision 2030 recommends) ……and it is not a quick fix! 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 51
  52. 52. The global quality agenda led by UNESCO • The SDGs • SDG 4 • Global and regional conventions • Quality enhancement initiative • 5 relevant for education • Education 2030: Towards inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all • Preparation of a Global Convention on the Recognition of Higher Education Qualifications – to be decided 2019 (UNESCO) • Quality assurance: Achieving sustainable development through a diverse provision of higher education, regional meetings and studies leading up to an international conference issuing guidance 2018 (UNESCO, INQAAHE, ICDE and COL) 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 52
  53. 53. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 53
  54. 54. Education 2030 Framework for Action (FFA) • UNESCO is entrusted to lead Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG4) - Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all - through the Education 2030 Framework for Action (FFA). 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 54
  55. 55. Main principles • Education is a fundamental human right and an enabling right. • Education is a public good, of which the state is the duty bearer. • Gender equality is inextricably linked to the right to education for all. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 55
  56. 56. ”Towards inclusive and equitable quality education and lifelong learning for all” 1. By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and Goal-4 effective learning outcomes 2. By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and preprimary education so that they are ready for primary education 3. By 2030, ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university 4. By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship 5. By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations 6. By 2030, ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy 7. By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development 8. Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, disability and gender sensitive and provide safe, nonviolent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all 9. By 2020, substantially expand globally the number of scholarships available to developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States and African countries, for enrolment in higher education, including vocational training and information and communications technology, technical, engineering and scientific programmes, in developed countries and other developing countries 10. By 2030, substantially increase the supply of qualified teachers, including through international cooperation for teacher training in developing countries, especially least developed countries and small island developing states 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 56
  57. 57. Target 3, point 43.: A well-established, properly-regulated tertiary education system supported by technology, Open Educational Resources (OERs) and distance education modalities can increase access, equity, quality and relevance, and narrow the gap between what is taught at tertiary education institutions and what economies and societies demand. The provision of tertiary education should be progressively free, in line with existing international agreements. Framework for Action Education 2030: November 2015 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 57
  58. 58. ICDE contributed - and, influenced the future: 20 November 2014: Open Education Key issues in policy for governments and senior management in higher education ICDE High Level Policy Forum 17 October 2015: “Higher education for the sustainable future we want. The way ahead for Online, Open and Flexible learning: Opportunities and Actions.” In partership with UNESCO, CoL and OEC Interventions, from UNESCO, ICDE and key experts and senior management: The Bali Message Global High Level Forum in Paris 9 – 11 JUNE 2015: Online, open and flexible higher education for the future we want UNESCO – in partnership with ICDE 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 58
  59. 59. QUALITY ASSURANCE: ACHIEVING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THROUGH A DIVERSE PROVISION OF HIGHER EDUCATION International Conference 2018 6 – 10 regional meetings 2016 - 2018 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 59
  60. 60. Quality issues • Opportunities – Access and scalability through online learning – Student support and mentoring systems – Learning analytics and other personalised technology enhanced learning systems • Challenges – Competencies • Faculty • Educational leaders • Quality agencies • Experts on quality assurance – Innovation – Access, inclusion – access to success – Ethics 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 60
  61. 61. The ICDE Quality initiatives • Benchmarking and good practice • Address quality: • Explore new methodologies: • Build future capacities • Models for Online, open, flexible and technology enhanced higher education • Global Quality Network • Learning analytics initiative • The Global Doctoral Consortium 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 61
  62. 62. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 62
  63. 63. The change • From focus on – Quality of students admitted – Qualification of faculty – Design and management of programmes – Rigour of marking – Course outputs as intended outcome? • To focus on – Student engagement and satisfaction – Data analytics to improve learning – Reflective assessments by students – Student-instructor- interaction – Assessments for learning – Faculty satisfaction and engagement 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 63
  64. 64. Where are we now? One year after……….. 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 64
  65. 65. http://gem-report-2016.unesco.org/en/home/ 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 65
  66. 66. World is not set to achieve key global education commitments until 2084. PROJECTIONS FOR EDUCATION 2030 2030 2042 2059 2084 Universal primary completion Universal Upper secondary completion Universal Lower secondary completion YEAR Education 2030 deadline Education 2030 deadline 2042 2059 2084 YEAR Global average Universal primary completion Universal Upper secondary completion Universal Lower secondary completion 2015 SDGs adopted 20872051 2062 Southern Asia After 21002080 2089 Sub-Saharan Africa 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 66
  67. 67. “Education needs to fundamentally change if we are to reach our global development goals” Press relase 6 September 2016 UNESCO: 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 67
  68. 68. Main Message: We need to fundamentally change education through inclusive quality and technology enhanced flexible education 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 68
  69. 69. Specific messages • Quality first: quality digital, open and flexible education • Collaboration, on all levels, on content, courses programmes, methodologies, infrastructure, internationalisation…. • Take leadership for change for the future we want – lead educational transformation 25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 69
  70. 70. ”TOWARDS INCLUSIVE AND EQUITABLE QUALITY EDUCATION AND LIFELONG LEARNING FOR ALL” Sustainable Development Goal 4: Education 2030 THANK YOUgjelsvik@icde.org www.icde.org Seize digital opportunities, lead educational transformation25.11.2016 Torunn Gjelsvik, Senior Advisor ICDE 70

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