Territories	
  &	
  Entrepreneurs:	
  
	
  
Ini0al	
  ideas	
  for	
  a	
  
Compara0ve	
  Territorial	
  Benchmarking	
  
...
INDEX:	
  
0.-­‐	
  Bio/Background	
  
	
  
1.-­‐	
  Research	
  Ques0on:	
  	
  
Territories	
  &	
  Entrepreneurs:	
  Pl...
hYp://about.me/icalzada	
  	
  
0.-­‐	
  Bio/Background	
  
	
  
•  Sociologist	
  +	
  MBA	
  by	
  Deusto	
  University	...
1.-­‐	
  Research	
  Ques0on	
  
	
  
	
  
Why	
  should	
  we	
  link	
  	
  
Territories	
  &	
  Entrepreneurs?	
  
	
  ...
1.-­‐	
  Research	
  Ques0on:	
  Overview	
  about	
  Time,	
  Space,	
  Place	
  and	
  Territory	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  ...
2.-­‐	
  Case	
  study:	
  Mondragon	
  (Basque	
  Country,	
  Spain).	
  
	
  
	
  
Why	
  should	
  we	
  highlight	
  (...
2.-­‐	
  Case	
  study:	
  Mondragon	
  (Basque	
  Country,	
  Spain).	
  
	
  
	
  
DESCRIPTION	
  
	
  
INTERPRETATION	
...
2.-­‐	
  Case	
  study:	
  Mondragon	
  (Basque	
  Country,	
  Spain).	
  Descrip0on	
  
	
  	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
by Fran Castill
2.-­‐	
  Case	
  study:	
  Mondragon	
  (Basque	
  Country,	
  Spain).	
  Descrip0on	
  
	
  	
  
	
  
	
 ...
 
Type	
   	
   	
   	
  Worker	
  coopera?ve	
  federa?on	
  
	
  
Founded	
   	
   	
   	
  1956	
  
	
  
Founder(s)	
  ...
2.-­‐	
  Case	
  study:	
  Mondragon	
  (Basque	
  Country,	
  Spain).	
  Descrip0on	
  
	
  	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
by Fran Castill
•  A.-­‐	
  The	
  Mondragon	
  coopera?ve	
  group,	
  named	
  officially	
  
Mondragon:	
  Humanity	
  at...
•  C.-­‐	
  In	
  the	
  industrial	
  area	
  the	
  percentage	
  of	
  interna?onal	
  
	
  sales	
  in	
  2010	
  amou...
•  E.-­‐	
  The	
  Mondragon	
  group	
  reflects	
  the	
  concern	
  of	
  
combining	
  the	
  basic	
  objec?ves	
  of	...
•  G.-­‐	
  The	
  Mondragon	
  coopera?ves	
  have	
  been	
  
construc?ng	
  a	
  wide	
  network	
  of	
  subsidiaries	...
2.-­‐	
  Case	
  study:	
  Mondragon	
  (Basque	
  Country,	
  Spain).	
  Interpreta0on	
  
	
  
	
  
Download	
  the	
  c...
by Fran Castill
1)	
  During	
  the	
  last	
  two	
  decades	
  many	
  coopera?ves	
  
belonging	
  to	
  the	
  Mondrag...
by Fran Castill
3)	
  Mul0na0onal	
  companies	
  and	
  democracy	
  seem	
  to	
  be	
  
antagonis?c	
  terms:	
  mul?na...
by Fran Castill
4)	
  However,	
  exploring	
  and	
  innova?ng	
  different	
  ways	
  that	
  
exist	
  to	
  democra?se	...
by Fran Castill
To	
  sum	
  up:	
  
	
  
1.-­‐	
  The	
  increased	
  presence	
  of	
  mul?na?onal	
  corpora?ons	
  imp...
by Fran Castill
Three	
  complimentary	
  approaches:	
  
	
  
1.-­‐	
  Objec?ve	
  
2.-­‐	
  Realis?c	
  
3.-­‐	
  Cri?ca...
1.-­‐	
  OBJECTIVE	
  approach:	
  
	
  
	
  
•  The	
  Mondragon	
  group	
  reflects	
  the	
  concern	
  of	
  combining...
2.-­‐	
  REALISTIC	
  approach:	
  
	
  
•  We	
   are	
   not	
   some	
   paradise,	
   but	
   rather	
   a	
   family	...
3.-­‐	
  CRITICALLY	
  CONSTRUCTIVE	
  approach:	
  
	
  
•  However,	
   Dr	
   Igor	
   Calzada,	
   in	
   his	
   chap...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  7/7.	
  
	
  
1.-­‐	
  Bees	
  &	
  Trees	
  
	
  
2.-­‐	
  Local	
  Communi0es	
  
	
  
3.-­‐	
  Tec...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  1/7	
  Key	
  Idea	
  
	
  
	
  
1)  Bees	
  &	
  Trees	
  Alliance:	
  Entrepreneurs	
  &	
  Compani...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  1/7	
  Key	
  Idea	
  
	
  
1)	
  Bees	
  &	
  Trees	
  Alliance.	
  
©	
  Igor	
  Calzada	
  2013	
  
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  2/7	
  Key	
  Idea	
  
	
  
2)	
  Back	
  to	
  the	
  Local	
  Communi0es:	
  
	
  
•  It	
  is	
  n...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  3/7	
  Key	
  Idea	
  
	
  
3)	
  Technocentric	
  èAnthropocentric	
  èBiocentric	
  approach	
  o...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  4/7	
  Key	
  Idea	
  
	
  
4)	
  ê	
  Communitarian	
  Social	
  Capital	
  (CSC):	
  
	
  
•  Inte...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  5/7	
  Key	
  Idea	
  
	
  
5)	
  Case	
  1:	
  IDeO	
  ORONA,	
  Innova0on	
  City:	
  Good	
  curre...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  6/7	
  Key	
  Idea	
  
	
  
6)	
  Case	
  2:	
  LEINN	
  degree.	
  Good	
  current	
  prac?ce.	
  
	...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  6/7	
  Key	
  Idea.	
  
	
  
6)	
  Case	
  2:	
  LEINN	
  degree.	
  Good	
  current	
  prac?ce.	
  
...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  7/7.	
  
	
  
7)	
  Challenge:	
  
	
  
•  The	
  great	
  challenge	
  for	
  Social	
  Innova?on	
 ...
2.-­‐	
  Chapter:	
  7/7.	
  
	
  
1.-­‐	
  Bees	
  &	
  Trees	
  
	
  
2.-­‐	
  Local	
  Communi0es	
  
	
  
3.-­‐	
  Tec...
3.- Current PostDoc Research:
•  Aims:
1.- To design a Systemic Analytical Framework to diagnose/intervene
Territories:
Ba...
3.- Current PostDoc Research:
•  Methodological phases:
Organizing the research in two complementary phases:
–  The Future...
Methodological phases:
Conceptual	
  Approach	
   Analy?cal	
  Approach	
   Empirical	
  Approach	
   Applied	
  Approach	...
5-­‐System	
  	
  
Analy0cal	
  
Systemic	
  
Framework	
  è	
  
Content’s elements: 5 Systems
©	
  Igor	
  Calzada	
  20...
Content’s elements: 3 Scales
©	
  Igor	
  Calzada	
  2013	
  
Content’s elements: 3 Scales
#PROJECT	
  
©	
  Igor	
  Calzada	
  2013	
  
Territory	
  è #Macro	
  
Content’s elements: 3 Scales
©	
  Igor	
  Calzada	
  2013	
  
Territory	
  è #Micro	
  
Content’s elements: 3 Scales
©	
  Igor	
  Calzada	
  2013	
  
Territory	
  è #Meso	
  
Content’s elements: 3 Scales
©	
  Igor	
  Calzada	
  2013	
  
Territory	
  è 3	
  Case	
  studies:	
  PhD 	
  
DUBLIN	
  
PORTLAND	
  
BASQUE	
  
Territory	
  è 3	
  Case	
  studies:	
  PostDoc 	
  
LIVERPOOL/MANCHESTER	
  
BASQUE	
  
ORESUND	
  
City-Region cases Typology
Oresund:
Malmö + Copenhagen
• Transborder
• high territorial sinergies
• in-between two Nation-...
Territory	
  è 3	
  Case	
  studies	
  PostDoc 	
  
©	
  Igor	
  Calzada	
  2013	
  
3.- Current PostDoc Research:
Conclusions:
1.  · Territory seen as City-Region
2.  · Approached from Social Innovation Ana...
Thanks	
  for	
  your	
  alen0on	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Dr	
  Igor	
  Calzada	
  
hYp://www.igorcalzada.com	
  
hYp://about.me...
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Social Entrepreneurship Research Colloquium Skool Centre Territories & Entrepreneurs Initial Ideas for a Comparative Territorial Benchmarking 23rd july 2013 Säid Business School Oxford University

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This presentation was shown on the 23rd July 2013 in the Social Entrepreneurship Research Colloquium organized by Skool Centre at the Säid Business School, University of Oxford (UK). The starting point is the Mondragon case from the Social Innovation published in the Edward Elgar's International Handbook, but the main purpose is presenting some initial ideas to highlight the importance of the Territory as the main asset in order to Social Entrepreneurship can be flourished among the collaboration of the territorial agents.

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Social Entrepreneurship Research Colloquium Skool Centre Territories & Entrepreneurs Initial Ideas for a Comparative Territorial Benchmarking 23rd july 2013 Säid Business School Oxford University

  1. 1. Territories  &  Entrepreneurs:     Ini0al  ideas  for  a   Compara0ve  Territorial  Benchmarking     Dr.  Igor  Calzada,  Ph.D.   PostDoctoral  Research  Fellow  at  the     University  of  Oxford  (UK).       Future  of  Ci?es  FoC  Programme,  COMPAS  &  InSIS.   &     Ikerbasque,  Basque  Founda?on  for  Science.   Lecturer  &  Senior  Researcher  at  the  University  of  Mondragon  (Spain).   2013  Research  Colloquium  on  Social  Entrepreneurship   Skoll  Centre  for  Social  Entrepreneurship,  Säid  Business  School.  University  of  Oxford  (UK)   12:15-­‐13:00   23rd  July  2013.  
  2. 2. INDEX:   0.-­‐  Bio/Background     1.-­‐  Research  Ques0on:     Territories  &  Entrepreneurs:  Place  MaYers     2.-­‐  Case  study:  Descrip0on  &  Interpreta0on.   Mondragon  case,  published  in  the  Interna?onal  Handbook   on  Social  Innova?on.     3.-­‐  Current  PostDoc  Research:  (Work-­‐In-­‐Progress)   Ini?al  ideas  for  a  Compara?ve  Territorial  Benchmarking  
  3. 3. hYp://about.me/icalzada     0.-­‐  Bio/Background     •  Sociologist  +  MBA  by  Deusto  University     •  10  years  in  Mondragon  Group   –  Innova?on  field   –  University:  Lecture  and  Senior  Researcher.   •  Also  ins?tu?onal  and  poli?cal  arena   •  PhD  in  the  west  of  USA   •  Thesis:     –  Comparing  Basque  Country,  Portland  (Oregon)  and  Dublin  (Ireland)   •  Right  now:    Doble  affilia?on   –  University  of  Oxford  (UK)  Future  of  Ci?es  Programme   –  Ikerbasque,  Basque  Founda?on  for  Science   •  PostDoc:   –  Comparing  Oresund  (SE&DK),  Liverpool/Manchester  (UK)  and  Basque   Country.  
  4. 4. 1.-­‐  Research  Ques0on       Why  should  we  link     Territories  &  Entrepreneurs?     Because,  PLACE  MATTERS  
  5. 5. 1.-­‐  Research  Ques0on:  Overview  about  Time,  Space,  Place  and  Territory           •  David  Harvey  (1990):  “Time  had  destroyed  Space”   •  Daniel  Innerarity  (2013):  “An  economic  geography  of  crea7vity  is   established  that  requires  a  significant  number  of  modifica7ons  in  a  way   territories  are  governed”   •  Ulrick  Beck  (2007):  “Territories  are  not  longer  ‘container  spaces’”   •  Anne  Lee  Saxenian  (2007):  “There  is  a  linkage  between  the  way  technology   entrepreneurs  build  regional  advantage  in  order  to  compete  in  global   markets”   •  Heather  Haveman  (2013):  ”As  spa7al  barriers  decline,  compe77on   expands  geographically  (space  maEers  less)  and  site  of  produc7on   becomes  more  relevant  (place  maEers  more)”  
  6. 6. 2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).       Why  should  we  highlight  (nowadays)     the  Territory  &  Social  Entrepreneurship,     (both  together)     when  refers  to  Mondragon  case?    
  7. 7. 2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).       DESCRIPTION     INTERPRETATION    
  8. 8. 2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Descrip0on            
  9. 9. by Fran Castill 2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Descrip0on            
  10. 10.   Type        Worker  coopera?ve  federa?on     Founded        1956     Founder(s)      José  María  Arizmendiarrieta     Headquarters      Mondragón,  Basque  Country,  Spain     Area  served      Interna?onal     Key  people      Txema  Gisasola  (Chairman)     Revenue        14,832  million  €  (2011)[1]     Employees      80,321  (2012)     Divisions        Finance,  Industry,  Retail,  Knowledge     Website        www.mondragon-­‐corpora?on.com       2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Descrip0on          
  11. 11. 2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Descrip0on            
  12. 12. by Fran Castill •  A.-­‐  The  Mondragon  coopera?ve  group,  named  officially   Mondragon:  Humanity  at  Work:  Finance-­‐Industry-­‐ Retail-­‐Knowledge,  has  aYracted  the  interest  of  many   researchers,  both  in  the  field  of  economic  democracy   as  well  as  in  business  in  general.     •  B.-­‐  The  experience  launched  in  1943  with  the   founda?on  of  a  Polytechnic  School,  has  become  a   coopera?ve  network  of  more  147  coopera0ves,   structured  into  four  groups  —  industrial,  financial,   distribu0on  and  research  &  training  —  today   employing  almost  80,321  persons  with  a  turnover  of   over  14,832  million  Euros  in  2011  (Mondragon,  2012).     2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Descrip0on            
  13. 13. •  C.-­‐  In  the  industrial  area  the  percentage  of  interna?onal    sales  in  2010  amounted  to  62.5%.       •  D.-­‐  It  should  be  noted  that  of  the  3.594  million  Euros  in   interna?onal  sales,  2.309  million  (56.7%)  corresponded   to  exports  from  the  produc0on  plants  in  the  Basque   Country  and  the  rest  -­‐1.555  million,  43.2%  -­‐   corresponded  to  the  produc?on  on  in  the  foreign   subsidiaries.   2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Descrip0on            
  14. 14. •  E.-­‐  The  Mondragon  group  reflects  the  concern  of   combining  the  basic  objec?ves  of  a  business   development  in  capitalist  markets  with  the  use  of   democra?c  methods  in  its  organiza?on,  job  crea?on,   promo?on  of  its  workers  in  human  and  professional   terms  and  commitment  to  the  development  of  its  social   environment  (Erras?,  2003).     •  F.-­‐  The  development  of  this  experience  over  the  last   decade,  par?cularly  on  an  interna?onal  level,  has   thrown  up  ques?ons  regarding  the  viability  of  the   Mondragon  coopera0ve  model  and,  consequently,  of   the  coopera?ve  model  in  general.   2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Decrip0on            
  15. 15. •  G.-­‐  The  Mondragon  coopera?ves  have  been   construc?ng  a  wide  network  of  subsidiaries  all  over   the  world,  93  subsidiaries  and  more  than  13.000   workers  in  2010,  mainly  in  emerging  na?ons  BRIC      (13  subsidiaries  in  China,  8  in  Czech  R.,  7  in  Mexico,  6  in    Poland  and  Brazil,  etc…).   •  H.-­‐  The  strategy  has  involved  acquisi?on  of   businesses  and  the  cons?tu?on  of  private  capital   affiliated  companies  (Mondragon,  2011).     2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Descrip0on            
  16. 16. 2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Interpreta0on       Download  the  chapter  here:  hYp://www.igorcalzada.com    
  17. 17. by Fran Castill 1)  During  the  last  two  decades  many  coopera?ves   belonging  to  the  Mondragon  coopera?ve  group  have   pursued  a  strategy  of  interna0onal  growth  that  had   transformed  the  original  local  coopera0ves  into   mul0na0onals  groups  with  many  affiliated  companies   all  over  the  world.   2)  The  main  issues  are  how  long  Mondragon   mul0na0onals  will  remain  key  creators  of  jobs  and   wealth  in  the  Basque  country  and  whether  or  not  the   coopera0ve  democra0c  model  will  prevail  among  its   subsidiaries.   2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Interpreta0on            
  18. 18. by Fran Castill 3)  Mul0na0onal  companies  and  democracy  seem  to  be   antagonis?c  terms:  mul?na?onal  refers  to  the  capacity   for  control  by  a  centralised  unit  distant  from  the  various   units  spread  over  a  number  of  countries  (hetero-­‐ management),  while  the  concept  of  democracy  refers  to   the  direct  control  by  those  involved  in  the  process  (self-­‐ management),  as  it  happens  in  the  coopera?ves.     2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Interpreta0on            
  19. 19. by Fran Castill 4)  However,  exploring  and  innova?ng  different  ways  that   exist  to  democra?se  companies,  even  mul?na?onals,  is  a   challenge  which  cannot  be  ignored  by  society  nor  by   companies  if  they  wish  to  con?nue  producing  goods  and   services  in  a  way  that  is  dis?nct  from  the  tradi?onal   capitalist  enterprises.  Seeking  produc0ve  mul0na0onal   business  models,  ones  as  democra0c  as  possible,  is  a   challenge,  above  all  for  those  democra0c  companies,  as   Mondragon  coopera0ves,  that  have  had  to  become   mul0na0onals.   2.-­‐  Case  study:  Mondragon  (Basque  Country,  Spain).  Interpreta0on            
  20. 20. by Fran Castill To  sum  up:     1.-­‐  The  increased  presence  of  mul?na?onal  corpora?ons  impose  a  series  of   obliga?ons  on  industrial  companies:  size  and  be  located  in  the  most  favourable   places.     2.-­‐  M  has  transformed  in  the  last  decade:   Basque  Country  based-­‐  produc?on  coopera?ves  è To  a  large  mul?na?onal  group  with  coopera?ve  plants  and  mul?ple  non-­‐coopera?ve   produc?on  subsidiaries  in  Eastern  Europe,  La?n  America  and  especially  China.     3.-­‐  M  has  seen  the  challenge  of  interna?onal  expansion  as  a  way  to  improving   compe??veness  for  the  preserva?on  of  the  local  and  coopera?ve  employment:   3.1.-­‐  Re-­‐loca?ons  may  be  a  loose  of  local  jobs.   3.2.-­‐  Investment  in  gradual  transforma?on  of  low  value-­‐added  jobs.     4.-­‐  In  spite  of  this,  re-­‐loca?on  has  just  only  begun.     5.-­‐  Industrial  coops  wonder:  Not  loosing  their  iden?ty,  deeply  rooted  in  the   community  and  based  on  a  democra?c  business  model.      
  21. 21. by Fran Castill Three  complimentary  approaches:     1.-­‐  Objec?ve   2.-­‐  Realis?c   3.-­‐  Cri?cally  Construc?ve  
  22. 22. 1.-­‐  OBJECTIVE  approach:       •  The  Mondragon  group  reflects  the  concern  of  combining  the  basic   objec7ves  of  a  business  development  in  capitalist  markets  with   the  use  of  democra?c  methods  in  its  organiza?on,  job  crea?on,   promo?on  of  its  workers  in  human  and  professional  terms  and   commitment  to  the  development  of  its  social  environment   (Erras?,  2003).       •  This  strategy  has  reinforced  the  compe00ve  posi0on  of  the   companies  but  has  produced  contradic0ons  between  the  basic   objec?ves  of  a  business  organisa?on  compe?ng  in  interna?onal   markets  and  the  historical  core  principles  and  values  of  the   Mondragon  coopera?ves  (Erras?,  2003)  
  23. 23. 2.-­‐  REALISTIC  approach:     •  We   are   not   some   paradise,   but   rather   a   family   of   co-­‐opera7ve   enterprises   struggling   to   build   a   different   kind   of   life   around   a     different  way  of  working.   •  Nonetheless,  given  the  performance  of  Spanish  capitalism  these   days  –  25%  unemployment,  a  broken  banking  system,  and   government-­‐imposed  austerity  (as  if  there  were  no  alterna7ve  to   that  either)  –  Mondragon  seems  a  welcome  oasis  in  a  capitalist   desert.     hYp://www.guardian.co.uk/commen?sfree/2012/jun/24/alterna?ve-­‐capitalism-­‐mondragon       24th  June  2012  The  Guardian  
  24. 24. 3.-­‐  CRITICALLY  CONSTRUCTIVE  approach:     •  However,   Dr   Igor   Calzada,   in   his   chapter   featured   in   the   Interna7onal   Handbook   for   Social   Innova7on   on   Mondragón,   advises  innovators  in  Spain:   •  To   reflect   a   homegrown   approach   to   social   entrepreneurship   that  steers  away  from  individualist  forms  imported  from  abroad   and   to   tend   more   towards   community-­‐inspired   approaches   as   that  taken  by  Mondragón  when  it  was  originally  established.     hEp://socialenterprise.guardian.co.uk/social-­‐enterprise-­‐network/2013/jan/02/spain-­‐enterpreneurs-­‐ economic-­‐enterprise-­‐coopera7ve     2nd  January  2013  The  Guardian  
  25. 25. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  7/7.     1.-­‐  Bees  &  Trees     2.-­‐  Local  Communi0es     3.-­‐  Technocentric  èAnthropocentric  “Triumphalist  Talent”  èBiocentric       4.-­‐  Communitarian  Social  Capital     5.-­‐  IDeO  ORONA,  Innova0on  City     6.-­‐  LEINN  degree     7.-­‐  Challenge    
  26. 26. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  1/7  Key  Idea       1)  Bees  &  Trees  Alliance:  Entrepreneurs  &  Companies.   •  To  contextualize  the  challenges  and  issues  that  the  Territory  &  Business   Nodes  confront  in  a  globalized  world.   •  Offering  the  idea  of  building-­‐up  “Crea?ve  Ecosystems”  (Mulgan,  2007  &   Murray,  2010)   •  We  call  it,  biocentric  approach:  cri?cal  value  of  land  and  Territory  as   primary  sources  of  Social  Innova?on.    
  27. 27. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  1/7  Key  Idea     1)  Bees  &  Trees  Alliance.   ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  28. 28. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  2/7  Key  Idea     2)  Back  to  the  Local  Communi0es:     •  It  is  not  likely  that  JMArizmendiarrieta  (1956)  &  had  heard  of  Jane  Jacobs   (1984)  ideas  about  Local  Communi?es.     •  However,  Mondragon  town  had  all  of  the  community  characteris?cs  that   Jacobs  had  established  for  an  environment  to  be  fer?le  for  Social   Innova?on,  which  is  what  ocurred.  
  29. 29. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  3/7  Key  Idea     3)  Technocentric  èAnthropocentric  èBiocentric  approach  of  Mondragon:     •  In  the  past,  during  periods  of  growth,  a  Technocentric  approach   prevailed.   •  Now,  from  the  more  holis?c  stance  of  corporate  social  iden?ty,   Mondragon  must  abandon  this  outdated  approach.   •  Hence,  Social  Entrepreneurship:   –  How  can  we  avoid  the  tempta?on  to  encourage  “Triumphalist   Talent”  (Anthropocentric)  at  the  University?   –  How  can  we  establish  a  new  genera?on  of  Social  Entrepreneurs  according  to  the   coopera?ve  tradi?onal  synergy  with  the  Biocentric  approach,  who  can  respond   crea?vely  to  the  current  economic,  social  and  environmental  challenges?          
  30. 30. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  4/7  Key  Idea     4)  ê  Communitarian  Social  Capital  (CSC):     •  Interna?onaliza?on  and  individualism  have  lowered  the  levels  of   Communitarian  Social  Capital  (CSC)     •  Therefore,  we  must  strike  a  balance  between  encouraging  individualist   and  triumphalist  forms  of  social  entrepreneurship  with  the  need  to   structure  communi?es,  which  are  the  basis  of  the  coopera?ve.    
  31. 31. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  5/7  Key  Idea     5)  Case  1:  IDeO  ORONA,  Innova0on  City:  Good  current  prac?ce.   •  Compa?ble  with  a  biocentric  perspec?ve  and  to  valorize  the  Territory.   •  World  leader  in  eleva?on  systems.   •  Stakeholders:    Companies,  University,  Entrepreneurs,  Public  Adm  and  Civic  Society.         hYp://www.orona.co.uk/en/sec?ons/we-­‐are-­‐orona/innova?on/orona-­‐ideo-­‐innova?on-­‐city.php    
  32. 32. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  6/7  Key  Idea     6)  Case  2:  LEINN  degree.  Good  current  prac?ce.      
  33. 33. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  6/7  Key  Idea.     6)  Case  2:  LEINN  degree.  Good  current  prac?ce.     •  Is  contribu?ng  to  the  forma?on  of  a  new  homegrown  talent  pool  of  social   entrepreneurs  which  is  consistent  with  the  vision  of  the  Mondragon   experience  and  that  will  enhance  truly  re?cular  coopera?ve   entrepreneurial  business  models.   •  The  future  of  Social  Innova?on  in  Mondragon  lies  not  with  large   companies  but  with  the  networked  structures  of  social  entrepreneurs.      
  34. 34. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  7/7.     7)  Challenge:     •  The  great  challenge  for  Social  Innova?on  research  for  the  Mondragon   case  lies  in  the  formulae,  methodologies,  case  studies  and  lessons  to  be   learned  from  the  processes  of  interna0onalizing  the  coopera0ves  that   currently  form  the  flagship  of  Mondragon.   •  Thus,  we  must  explore  a  new  concept  of  Social  Entrepreneurship  in   different  emerging  industries:  entrepreneurs  with  large  glocal  networks   who  are  highly  specialized  and  prepared  to  form  or  lead  culturally  and   thema?cally  diverse  teams.     •  To  sum  up:  The  real  issue  for  the  Mondragon  experience  today  is  that:  No   coopera0ve  forms  of  society  currently  ar0culate  the  new  economic   ecosystem  on  a  systema0c  basis.    
  35. 35. 2.-­‐  Chapter:  7/7.     1.-­‐  Bees  &  Trees     2.-­‐  Local  Communi0es     3.-­‐  Technocentric  èAnthropocentric  “Triumphalist  Talent”  èBiocentric       4.-­‐  Communitarian  Social  Capital     5.-­‐  IDeO  ORONA,  Innova0on  City     6.-­‐  LEINN  degree     7.-­‐  Challenge    
  36. 36. 3.- Current PostDoc Research: •  Aims: 1.- To design a Systemic Analytical Framework to diagnose/intervene Territories: Basic Research. 2.- While carrying out field work case-study research: Applied Research.
  37. 37. 3.- Current PostDoc Research: •  Methodological phases: Organizing the research in two complementary phases: –  The Future of the City-Regions: Basic Research. –  Comparative Territorial Benchmarking: Applied Research. •  Content’s elements: Modelling an Analytical Systemic Framework consist of: –  5 Systems. –  3 Scales. •  Field work research: Carrying out case-studies: –  Dublin, Portland and Basque. –  Oresund, Manchester/Liverpool and Basque.
  38. 38. Methodological phases: Conceptual  Approach   Analy?cal  Approach   Empirical  Approach   Applied  Approach   The  Future  of  the  City-­‐Regions   Compara0ve  Territorial  Benchmarking   Basic  Research   Applied  Research   ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  39. 39. 5-­‐System     Analy0cal   Systemic   Framework  è   Content’s elements: 5 Systems ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  40. 40. Content’s elements: 3 Scales ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  41. 41. Content’s elements: 3 Scales #PROJECT   ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  42. 42. Territory  è #Macro   Content’s elements: 3 Scales ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  43. 43. Territory  è #Micro   Content’s elements: 3 Scales ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  44. 44. Territory  è #Meso   Content’s elements: 3 Scales ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  45. 45. Territory  è 3  Case  studies:  PhD   DUBLIN   PORTLAND   BASQUE  
  46. 46. Territory  è 3  Case  studies:  PostDoc   LIVERPOOL/MANCHESTER   BASQUE   ORESUND  
  47. 47. City-Region cases Typology Oresund: Malmö + Copenhagen • Transborder • high territorial sinergies • in-between two Nation-States (Sweden & Denmark) Liverpool & Manchester • Two twin City-Regions • with physical proximity • but low territorial sinergy Basque • Transborder • low territorial sinergies • in-between two Nation-States (Spain & France) Territory  è 3  Case  studies:  PostDoc   ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  48. 48. Territory  è 3  Case  studies  PostDoc   ©  Igor  Calzada  2013  
  49. 49. 3.- Current PostDoc Research: Conclusions: 1.  · Territory seen as City-Region 2.  · Approached from Social Innovation Analytical Systemic Framework 3.  · Social Entrepreneurship is just a factor into the whole Framework; and depends on the rest of the Territorial composition’s factors. 4.  · Carried out by Action Research.
  50. 50. Thanks  for  your  alen0on         Dr  Igor  Calzada   hYp://www.igorcalzada.com   hYp://about.me/icalzada   @icalzada    

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