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User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning

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In this paper we present the multi-layer approach to designing for user User Engagement (UE) in Wearable Enhanced Learning (WELL) for healthy ageing as part of an R&D project called “Fitness MOOC - interaction of seniors with wearable fitness trackers in the MOOC (fMOOC)”. fMOOC is a wearable-technology enhanced learning solution combining the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) approach with embodied learning experience enhanced by wearable activity trackers used to track and monitor physical activity of senior learners. The paper proposes an adaptation of a standard User Experience (UX) model to the context of learning and instructional design and describes how methods for User Engagement (UE) design have been applied on five different levels, i.e. conceptual, requirements, instructional, architecture and interface design, in the fMOOC project.

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User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning

  1. 1. Designing for User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning (WELL) for Healthy Ageing Prof. Dr. Ilona Buchem* (presenter), Prof. Dr. Jörn Kreutel, Prof. Dr. Agathe Merceron Beuth University of Applied Sciences Berlin Marten Haesner, Anika Steinert Geriatrics Research Group, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
  2. 2. Wearables & Learning User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Wearable-technology Enhanced Learning (WELL) as one of the earmarks of the transition from the desktop age through the mobile age to the age of ubiquitous computing. Wearable enhanced learning is possible in the state of physical activity and the device is body-worn. Extended Personal Learning Environments (ePLE): with integrated wearable technologies support harnessing (a) contextual information by capturing personalised, instant and context specific information, (b) contextual interaction by bringing multiple, spatially distributed learners together; and (c) contextual action by triggering opportunities for personal learning in a given context.
  3. 3. fMOOC - fitness MOOC User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Fitness MOOC for Healthy Ageing Wearable fitness trackers as part of the personal learning environment: learning about own fitness > contextual information learning through social interaction > contextual interaction learning through concrete experience > contextual action
  4. 4. Wearable activity trackers User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 “A third of U.S. consumers who have owned one stopped using the device within six months of receiving it.”
  5. 5. From adoption to user engagement User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 (Ledger, 2014)
  6. 6. Long-term user engagement User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Designing a strategy to ensure sustained engagement Key Factor #1 - Habit Formation (moving beyond presenting data to enhancing habit loops (e.g. situational & social cues, action triggers, rewards) Key Factor #2 - Social Motivation (social connections for sharing achieving goals, social support and encouragement, shared patterns of behaviour, competing and collaborating to enact change) Key Factor #3 - Goal Reinforcement (engineering personal progress toward defined goals, small goals, continuous progress and real-time feedback (Ledger, 2014).
  7. 7. fMOOC aims User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Aims at enhancing daily well-being of seniors 65+ through: • Healthy ageing (habit formation) promoting everyday movement (e.g. walking), sport elements (e.g. jogging, biking), physical exercises (e.g. sit-ups) and combining physical activity with regeneration phases by presenting fitness data and enhancing habit formation loops, e.g. battles (challenges), badges (rewards). • Connected learning experience (social motivation) promoting well-being and healthy ageing as a whole, i.e. not only in terms of physical fitness but also socio- psychological well-being by enhancing self-efficacy and social support • Motivation and resilience (goal reinforcement) by supporting users making changes to their lifestyle in small increments over time, e.g. visualisation of progress, system and community feedback, pre and post fitness tests.
  8. 8. fMOOC & wearable activity trackers User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Learning at the computer Learning with the computer
  9. 9. fMOOC & experiential learning User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Concrete experience (doing something / having an experience) Abstract conceptualisation (concluding / learning from the experience) Reflective observation (reviewing / reflecting on the experience) Active experimentation (planning / trying out what has been learned) Experiential Learning (Kolb, 1984) Kolb, D (1984). Experiential Learning as the Science of Learning and Development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  10. 10. fMOOC & embodied learning User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Bodily awareness - enables multi-sensory learning experience, e.g. movements, emotions. Bodily feedback - enables feedback and reflection on own body, e.g. fitness data visualisation. Bodily effects - enables embodied learning results, e.g. knowledge about own fitness, bodily memories. Body with its sensor-motor experiences as the way to acquire learning. Drawing attention back to the body through the recognition of the movement as part of learning and embodied knowledge created through movement:
  11. 11. fMOOC & user engagement User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 User Experience (UX) User Engagement (UE) User engagement (UE) as the quality of the user experience (UX) that emphasises the first person, sensory experience, e.g. being captivated, enjoyment motivation, enthusiasm. Designing for user engagement in TEL is designing engaging learning experiences (may be evaluated by applying engagement metrics such as performed learning activities, number of social interactions). UE is associated with specific user characteristics, e.g. focused attention, sense of control, novel and unexpected experience, positive emotions during the interaction, willingness to repeat the experience.
  12. 12. fMOOC multi-layer UX/UE Model User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Made based on: Garrett, J. (2002). The Elements of User Experience: User-Centered Design for the Web. New Riders Publishing Thousand Oaks, CA, USA
  13. 13. fMOOC UX/UE Model - conceptual design User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Healthy ageing as a dynamic state of physical, mental, social well-being Healthy ageing as a set of individual capabilities Healthy ageing as process of optimising opportunities for physical, social and mental health The conceptual design of the fMOOC combines health, learning and technology as three distinctive research fields in the interdisciplinary approach to wearable enhanced learning for healthy ageing. The central objective of fMOOC is promoting health & healthy ageing.
  14. 14. fMOOC UX/UE Model - requirements design User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 The requirements engineering process in fMOOC includes elicitation, specification and design of senior user requirements according to the agile development, SCRUM methodology. Requirements are designed in form of use cases and user stories.
  15. 15. fMOOC UX/UE Model - instructional design User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 The instructional design of the fMOOC combines the elements of the MOOC with elements of gamification and seamless learning to create an engaging flow of learning experiences (online, offline), blending learning with daily life.
  16. 16. fMOOC UX/UE Model - architecture design User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 The fMOOC architecture combines wearable, mobile and learning technologies to capture and share fitness data and content (e.g. training plans, exercise videos) with the community of senior learners. Learners access fMOOC via the fMOOC app. The tracking service connects with the fitness tracking data service of the wearable device to retrieve data.
  17. 17. fMOOC UX/UE Model - interface design User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 The fMOOC user interface has been designed to be accessible for older users (aged 65+) making use of the key usability principles from multidisciplinary usability research, e.g. psychology, computer science, economic studies, engineering
  18. 18. User Engagement in Wearable Enhanced Learning / Ilona Buchem / 13-07-2015 / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 Thank you! Prof. Dr. Ilona Buchem Blog: ibuchem.wordpress.com E-mail: buchem@beuth-hochschule.de Twitter: @mediendidaktik

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