rhetorical
analysis:    rhetoric—
“ora1on”     analysis—(ana=up,
  lysis=loosen)
“to
break
           apart”
Reading
and
Wri1ng
in
English
101:Read         “talk”        write                           more write          reread   ...
• What
is
the
argument’s
purpose?• Who
is
its
audience?• What
appeals
(pathos,
ethos,
logos)
does
it
  use?• What’s
the
ty...
• What
other
authori1es
does
the
argument
  rely
upon?• What
evidence
is
used?

How
is
it
arranged
  and
presented?• What
...
•Pathos:•Logos:•Ethos:
•Pathos: Emotion•Logos:•Ethos:
•Pathos: Emotion•Logos: Logic•Ethos:
•Pathos: Emotion•Logos: Logic•Ethos: Credibility       / Morality
Which
appeals
did
they
employ?• Derek
Bok,
regarding
censorship
at
Harvard• Texas
Dept
of
Transporta1on,
in
their
an1‐  dr...
What
ques1ons
did
they
ask?• Seth
Stevenson,
wri1ng
on
Bob
Dylan
and
  Victoria’s
Secret• Zombie,
analyzing
the
San
Franci...
The
“Rhetorical
Analysis”
    assignment
1
(due
Tues
12
July)•   Low‐stakes
wri1ng:
prac1ce,
not
final
product•   Read
both...
The
“Rhetorical
Analysis”
     assignment
2
(due
Fri
15
July)•   S1ll
low‐stakes•   Read
your
peers’
essays
first•   Reread...
Rhetorical analysis
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Rhetorical analysis

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A guide to rhetorical analysis, as presented in Chapter 5 of Everything's an Argument

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  • Relates to Ch. 5. More info. First: dig into the terms.\n
  • In this class, reading is a 5-step process. The essays are complex, and you might not understand much after a first read.\n
  • (Work through these one by one, and reference earlier discussion of Ethos/Pathos/Logos) As in any toolkit, you are not meant to use every single tool to address every single problem—this would be equivalent to pulling out the wrench, the hammer, the drill, the tape measure, the pliers, the screwdriver, etc. when all you might need is a thumbtack. The trick is knowing which tool to use—and you do that by becoming familiar with the job that each one does. \n
  • \n
  • P. 107: An author must consider both whom he’s writing to and why he’s writing—and the ways that those two ideas interconnect. \n
  • Let’s look at these again--they’re important\n
  • Sympathy, empathy, pathetic--it means pain. But now--emotion in any sense. Sentimentality, humor, fear, etc.\n
  • Reasoning and facts. The backbone of academic writing.\n
  • In Greek: one word meant two things. Ethos = ethics, but also credibility. Ethos means “I can be trusted”\n
  • Bok = logos, ethos\nTexas DOT = pathos\nTextbook = a blend. Logos, but lots of pathos and two kinds of ethos (academic, “current”)\n\n
  • If you need models of a Rhet Anal, look back here\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Rhetorical analysis

    1. 1. rhetorical
analysis: rhetoric—
“ora1on” analysis—(ana=up,
 lysis=loosen)
“to
break
 apart”
    2. 2. Reading
and
Wri1ng
in
English
101:Read “talk” write more write reread 2
    3. 3. • What
is
the
argument’s
purpose?• Who
is
its
audience?• What
appeals
(pathos,
ethos,
logos)
does
it
 use?• What’s
the
type
or
genre?• Who
is
making
the
argument?

What
ethos
 does
it
create?


    4. 4. • What
other
authori1es
does
the
argument
 rely
upon?• What
evidence
is
used?

How
is
it
arranged
 and
presented?• What
claims
are
advanced;
what
issues
are
 raised,
and
what
issues
are
ignored
or
 evaded?• What
are
the
contexts—social,
poli1cal,
 historical,
cultural—for
the
argument?• How
does
language
or
style
work
to
persuade
 an
audience?
    5. 5. •Pathos:•Logos:•Ethos:
    6. 6. •Pathos: Emotion•Logos:•Ethos:
    7. 7. •Pathos: Emotion•Logos: Logic•Ethos:
    8. 8. •Pathos: Emotion•Logos: Logic•Ethos: Credibility / Morality
    9. 9. Which
appeals
did
they
employ?• Derek
Bok,
regarding
censorship
at
Harvard• Texas
Dept
of
Transporta1on,
in
their
an1‐ drunk‐driving
campaign• This
textbook,
in
aPemp1ng
to
convince
you
 that
rhetorical
analysis
is
engaging
and
 important?
    10. 10. What
ques1ons
did
they
ask?• Seth
Stevenson,
wri1ng
on
Bob
Dylan
and
 Victoria’s
Secret• Zombie,
analyzing
the
San
Francisco
Chronicle• Dick
Rogers,
responding
to
Zombie’s
analysis
 and
the
original
photos• Milena
Ateya,
analyzing
Derek
Bok’s
argument
    11. 11. The
“Rhetorical
Analysis”
 assignment
1
(due
Tues
12
July)• Low‐stakes
wri1ng:
prac1ce,
not
final
product• Read
both
essays;
analyze
only
one• Think
about
the
“toolkit”
on
p.
98• Think
about
audience,
author,
purpose• Do
more
than
just
agree
or
disagree• Submit
in
personal
(“Your
Name”)
folder
and
 in
group
folder 12
    12. 12. The
“Rhetorical
Analysis”
 assignment
2
(due
Fri
15
July)• S1ll
low‐stakes• Read
your
peers’
essays
first• Reread
both
essays;
analyze
the
same
one• Dig
deeper• Use
more
“toolkit”
techniques• Submit
in
personal
(“Your
Name”)
folder
only 13

    ×